If you’re researching “how much do breast implants cost,” chances are you are imagining all the benefits they offer. Breast augmentation is the top cosmetic plastic surgery procedure performed in the United States for a reason. Breast augmentations have a high rate of patient satisfaction according to research. In a study published in the May 2013 issue of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery, researchers gathered information from 225 women after their breast augmentations. The study revealed that 91.1% of women felt improved self-esteem, 64.3% had an improved quality of life, and 98.7% would repeat the surgery. But there is another side to breast implants, one you should know about before scheduling your plastic surgery consultation. While the initial costs and satisfaction rates are similar between implant types, the long-term maintenance costs and emotional toll differs in important ways. Silicone gel breast implants carry a high rate of certain complications and an increased anxiety when compared to the newest breast implant on the market, IDEAL IMPLANT® Structured Breast Implants.
The IDEAL IMPLANT Structured Breast Implant is often compared to silicone gel breast implants because they both offer beautiful, natural looking results. But, beyond the aesthetic comparisons, the IDEAL IMPLANT Structured Breast Implant and silicone gel breast implants are very different. The IDEAL IMPLANT Structured Breast Implant is filled with saline for a woman’s peace of mind. Saline is naturally absorbed by the body in case of a rupture, and a rupture can be easily detected by simply looking at the breasts. Without silicone gel inside there is no need for repeated MRIs and no anxiety about silent ruptures. The risk of complications such as rupture and capsular contracture are also much lower with the IDEAL IMPLANT based on clinical trial results at 8 years. That means the cost of your primary breast augmentation is likely the only cost you need to consider when asking how much do breast implants cost.
This includes the cost of the implants, which ranges from $1,000 to $1,300 as well as a facility fee of $800 to $1,200, an anesthesia fee of $600 to $800 and the surgeon's fee that averages $4,005 for silicone-gel filled implants and $3,583 for saline implants. Patients in the western United States can expect to pay the highest average surgeon's fee of about $3,949, while patients in the south central part of the country generally pay lower fees with an average of $2,739.

Saline-filled Breast Implants. Saline-filled breast implants are filled with sterile saline (salt water). They come in both smooth and textured shells and can be round or anatomically (tear-drop) shaped. Saline breast implants are also available in low and high profiles, and in many sizes. A saline-filled breast implant is usually empty before implantation. The doctor moves it into place during your surgery, and then fills it. The saline is administered via a process that ensures the implants remain sterile.
Dr. Mess receive patients from many for Washington DC and nearby cities and performs the fat transfer in her office in Columbia, Md, at Northwest Hospital near Baltimore, and at Howard County General Hospital. There are different techniques for fat transfer depending on the area being treated; small volume to face and hands vs. medium volume to enhance breast reconstruction vs. large volume to enhance buttocks and augment breast without implants. Common donor sites are the patient’s abdomen, thighs, or love handles.  The fat is suctioned by hand for small volume and by liposuction machine for large volume.  The fat is gently separated to concentrate the viable fat from fluid and nonessential matter.  The concentrated fat is re-injected into the desired area with small cannulas designed to maximize the survival of the transferred fat.  Dr. Sarah Mess has spent years refining her fat transfer technique to offer her patients outstanding fat transfer outcomes.
The FDA has identified that breast implants may be associated with a rare form of cancer called anaplastic large-cell lymphoma, believed to be associated with chronic bacterial inflammation.[69] Similar ALCL phenomena have been seen with other types of medical implants including vascular access ports, orthopedic hip implants, and jaw (TMJ) implants. As of February 1, 2017, the FDA has received a total of 359 medical device reports of breast-implant-associated ALCL (BIALCL), including 9 deaths.[70] Most cases of breast implant-associated ALCL had implants in for many years prior to the condition, and are usually treated successfully by simple removal of the implant and the capsule surrounding the implant without the need for chemotherapy if no evidence of systemic disease exists. If women with implants present with delayed swelling or fluid collection, cytologic studies and test for a marker "CD30" are suggested. The American Society of Plastic Surgery (ASPS) states, "CD30 is the main diagnostic test that must be performed on the seroma fluid as routine pathology or H&E staining can frequently miss the diagnosis." [71] Diagnosis and treatment of breast implant associated ALCL now follows standardized guidelines established by the National Comprehensive Cancer Network.[72]
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