I had wrongly assumed he could simply flatten the hump and be done, but he explained that you can't sculpt one area without considering how it'll impact everything else. If he smoothed the bridge and did nothing else, my nose could wind up looking far too wide from the front. So ultimately, he would need to break my nose and seamlessly draw it in closer to create the precise size and shape I was after. He'd also have to reduce the cartilage at the tip and turn it up slightly, from 91 to 93 degrees. In the end, my nose would be smaller, with a straighter bridge, a refined tip, and more clearly defined nostrils.
The U.S. Food and Drug Administration established the age ranges for women seeking breast implants; for breast reconstruction, silicone-gel filled implants and saline-filled implants were approved for women of all ages; for breast augmentation, saline implants were approved for women 18 years of age and older; silicone implants were approved for women 22 years of age and older.[120] Because each breast implant device entails different medical risks, the minimum age of the patient for saline breast implants is different from the minimum age of the patient for silicone breast implants—because of the filler leakage and silent shell-rupture risks; thus, periodic MRI screening examinations are the recommended post-operative, follow-up therapy for the patient.[121] In other countries, in Europe and Oceania, the national health ministries' breast implant policies do not endorse periodic MRI screening of asymptomatic patients, but suggest palpation proper—with or without an ultrasonic screening—to be sufficient post-operative therapy for most patients.

Unfortunately, as time goes on it is often difficult for patients to remember the specifics of the type of breast augmentation surgery and implants that they had.  Your are not alone!  The easiest way to determine what type of implant you had is to request a copy of the operative report from either the hospital, surgery center or your surgeon's office.  The implant specifics are recorded on this document.  Your office record also includes this information.  If it has been over ten years since your procedure, sometimes these records are no longer available.  Ultrasound or MRI can help to answer this question but it is an expensive way to solve the mystery and not an indication for these procedures.  If you registered your implants with the manufacturer at the time of surgery, the company will have a record of this information.  Fortunately, this inforation is not absoltely critical to your health unless you are having a problem with your implants.  Your surgeon can often develop a reasonable treatment plan even without this information.  I would strongly recommend that you register your implants and purchase the affordable insurance program if you have surgery again.  These programs are helpful in storing vital information regarding your implant type, size, filler, model and lot number.  Should there be a recall or long term problem requiring additional surgery, this information is readily available.  There is often also some fiancial support to offset costs.  Investigate the options available by contacting your surgeon or the implant manufacturer's websites.

Another option is to consider getting your breast implants at a teaching hospital from a learning resident. You won’t get the delicate skill of an experienced, board-certified surgeon, but teaching hospital residents are “assisted by established, experienced, private attending surgeons,” says Beverly Hills plastic surgeon Dr. Robin T.W. Yuan in a RealSelf Q&A.
Cosmetic surgeons use a variety of incision techniques for breast lift surgery; the exact technique used will vary based on a patient’s existing breast tissue, the amount of excess skin to be removed, and her personal goals. Your cosmetic surgeon will recommend the type of breast lift that will achieve optimal results with the least conspicuous scarring possible.
Potential candidates should also have adequate fat reserves for transfer. This becomes especially important when one considers the anticipated rate of fat resorption and graft loss. I typically recommened patients aim for at least 500 cc transferred per cheek. This would amount to 1 liter of fat (not lipoaspirate) after processing. Candidates with inadequate fat reserves are likely to be disappointed with their ultimate volume once healing is complete. 
As with any medical/surgical treatment, individual results may vary. Only a surgeon/physician can determine whether reconstruction or augmentation>is an appropriate course of treatment. The following are general adverse events associated with breast implant surgery: Device Rupture, Capsular contracture, Infection, Hematoma/Seroma, Pain, Reoperation, Implant removal, changes in Nipple and Breast Sensation, unsatisfactory results, breast-feeding complications. Other reported conditions are listed in the Product Insert Data Sheet (PIDS). See full list in the PIDS for the product information. These potential adverse events, including contraindications, warnings, and precautions need to be discussed with your doctor prior to surgery.
The woman wanting a lift is usually slightly different. She had breasts she was happy with before, she had loving kids who she may or may not have breastfed, exercised and had a good life. They come wanting to restore the youthful breast they once they had(or better), they hate that it is slightly more deflated than before and it's slightly more south then they'd like. The formal name of this operation is "Mastopexy" and that's why you hear terms like "Mastopexy augmentation" because often in order to restore the youthfulness of the breast you not only need to reposition the nipple/areolar complex "up" with a mastopexy, you also need to provide some additional volume with an implant, hence augmentation as well. The discussion with implant also is entirely different discussion all together, but this highlights the primary difference in the reduction and a lift.
The plastic surgical emplacement of breast implant devices, either for breast reconstruction or for aesthetic purpose, presents the same health risks common to surgery, such as adverse reaction to anesthesia, hematoma (post-operative bleeding), late hematoma (post-operative bleeding after 6 months or more),[21] seroma (fluid accumulation), incision-site breakdown (wound infection). Complications specific to breast augmentation include breast pain, altered sensation, impeded breast-feeding function, visible wrinkling, asymmetry, thinning of the breast tissue, and symmastia, the “bread loafing” of the bust that interrupts the natural plane between the breasts. Specific treatments for the complications of indwelling breast implants—capsular contracture and capsular rupture—are periodic MRI monitoring and physical examinations. Furthermore, complications and re-operations related to the implantation surgery, and to tissue expanders (implant place-holders during surgery) can cause unfavorable scarring in approximately 6–7 per cent of the patients. [22][23][24] Statistically, 20 per cent of women who underwent cosmetic implantation, and 50 per cent of women who underwent breast reconstruction implantation, required their explantation at the 10-year mark.[25]
Having a breast lift is similar to resetting the clock for sagging. Your breasts will still undergo natural changes due to the aging process, although with proper care you should not experience your previous level of sagging for many years. However, it is important to understand that certain life events, such as future pregnancy or weight fluctuations can negatively affect your results. If you are planning to have more children or you would like to lose weight, it is best to achieve these milestones before having a breast lift.
Silicone implant rupture can be evaluated using magnetic resonance imaging; from the long-term MRI data for single-lumen breast implants, the European literature about second generation silicone-gel breast implants (1970s design), reported silent device-rupture rates of 8–15 per cent at 10-years post-implantation (15–30% of the patients).[45][46][47][48]
The fat transfer procedure is fairly similar for all areas of the body, by taking fat from one area of your body, usually your stomach, buttocks, or thighs, through Liposuction, and then transferring it to a desired area. You will not only gain in one area, but lose in another area that you would like to. While the procedure is basically the same for all, the information below will explain how each area will show improvement.
Case 34: Hispanic Rhinoplasty in this patient meant removal of a high dorsal bump on profile and correction of a droopy-appearing tip. On front view, there is correction of a left nasal bone fracture and refinement of the nasal tip. All of this was done while still maintaining her unique individuality and while bearing in mind the various challenges Rhinoplasty in Latino patients present- thicker skin and softer cartilage.
Since the early 1990s, a number of independent systemic comprehensive reviews have examined studies concerning links between silicone gel breast implants and claims of systemic diseases. The consensus of these reviews (outlined below under Safety of Breast Implants heading) is that there has been no evidence of a causal link between the implantation of saline or silicone breast implants and systemic disease After investigating this issue, the U.S. FDA has concurred and since reaffirmed that “the weight of the epidemiological evidence published in the literature does not support an association between fibromyalgia and breast implants.”. A comprehensive systemic review by Lipworth (2011) [66] concludes that "any claims that remain regarding an association between cosmetic breast implants and CTDs are not supported by the scientific literature".
In 1997, the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) appointed the Institute of Medicine (IOM) of the U.S. National Academy of Sciences (NAS) to investigate the potential risks of operative and post-operative complications from the emplacement of silicone breast implants. The IOM's review of the safety and efficacy of silicone gel-filled breast implants, reported that the "evidence suggests diseases or conditions, such as connective tissue diseases, cancer, neurological diseases, or other systemic complaints or conditions are no more common in women with breast implants, than in women without implants" subsequent studies and systemic review found no causal link between silicone breast implants and disease.[113]

The saline breast implant—filled with saline solution (biological-concentration salt water 0.90% w/v of NaCl, ca. 300 mOsm/L.)—was first manufactured by the Laboratoires Arion company, in France, and was introduced for use as a prosthetic medical device in 1964. The contemporary models of saline breast implant are manufactured with thicker, room-temperature vulcanized (RTV) shells made of a silicone elastomer. The study In vitro Deflation of Pre-filled Saline Breast Implants (2006) reported that the rates of deflation (filler leakage) of the pre-filled saline breast implant made it a second-choice prosthesis for corrective breast surgery.[88] Nonetheless, in the 1990s, the saline breast implant was the prosthesis most common device used for breast augmentation surgery in the United States, because of the U.S. FDA's restriction against the implantation of silicone-filled breast implants outside of clinical studies. Saline breast implants have enjoyed little popularity in the rest of the world, possessing negligible market share.


A curvature and droopy tip brings undue focus to this young man’s nose. Although there is still some swelling in these early post-operative photos, we can already see a nose that is now straight, has a smooth profile and no longer droops. A sense of length is preserved to match his oval face. More than that, because of these positive changes, he also looks younger.
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