They are essentially very similar procedures. The difference is in the amount of breast tissue removed. In a breast lift procedure, the nipple areolar complex is lift to a better position on the breast, and some breast tissue is removed and the breast envelope tightened. In a breast reduction, the nipple areolar complex is also lifted, but much more breast tissue is removed. 
Firstly about surgical technique. Breast lift and reduction employ similar surgical technique, it's just that with reduction you're removing more breast tissue (because the biggest aim of a reduction is.... to reduce the size of the breast). Does breast lift remove SOME breast tissue, the answer is yes, but the AIM of the lift is more to restore the youthfulness of the breast. Both women, one wanting a reduction vs a lift need their nipple/areolar complex repositioned "up". Only the woman wanting a reduction need the volume addressed.
We strongly recommend you choose an implant type with your surgeon, who will be able to match the right type to accomplish your desired results. All available implants are considered good, safe choices. However, this article will explain the pros and cons of each of the three main types of breast implants so you can get an idea of what might be the best fit for you.
There are two main types of implants for you to consider: saline and silicone. Most people say the silicone implants feel and look more natural than saline, but they cost more. Silicone implants are typically about $1,000 more than saline, but if you’re interested in gummy bear implants—a type of silicone implant—expect to pay even more. In a RealSelf Q&A, Omaha, Nebraska plastic surgeon Dr. Richard J. Bruneteau says you should expect to pay “about $500 more than standard silicone implants.”
Fill Filled with a highly cohesive gel for durable shape retention designed to give a youthful feel. Filled with a proprietary cohesive gel that hold together uniformly while retaining the natural give that resembles breast tissue. Filled with a saltwater solution similar to the fluid that makes up most of the human body; slightly firmer feel than gel.
The breast implant has no clinical bearing upon lumpectomy breast-conservation surgery for women who developed breast cancer after the implantation procedure, nor does the breast implant interfere with external beam radiation treatments (XRT); moreover, the post-treatment incidence of breast-tissue fibrosis is common, and thus a consequent increased rate of capsular contracture.[108] The study Breast Cancer Detection and Survival among Women with Cosmetic Breast Implants: Systematic Review and Meta-analysis of Observational Studies, reported an average later stage in the diagnoses of women who developed breast cancer after undergoing breast augmentation, when compared to breast cancer patients who had not undergone breast augmentation, although this did not ultimately affect the patients prognosis. The use of implants for breast reconstruction after breast cancer mastectomy appears to have no negative effect upon the incidence of cancer-related death.[105][109]
Sometimes insurance pays for a rhinoplasty, but it depends on the insurance policy. Before scheduling surgery, your doctor's office will help you get prior written authorization from your insurance company. Although this isn't a guarantee of coverage, it's the only way to confirm that rhinoplasty is a covered benefit. Sometimes insurance will pay for a part of a nasal surgery, but not other parts. In these cases, you can contact the business office to get a quote for the operation.

Transaxillary: an incision made to the axilla (armpit), from which the dissection tunnels medially, to emplace the implants, either bluntly or with an endoscope (illuminated video microcamera), without producing visible scars on the breast proper; yet, it is likelier to produce inferior asymmetry of the implant-device position. Therefore, surgical revision of transaxillary emplaced breast implants usually requires either an IMF incision or a periareolar incision.
Case 94: This patient was seeing the early signs of facial aging including loss of skin tone and elasticity, early jowling, and heaviness under the chin. A lower facelift along with fat transfer to the under eye and cheek area substantially improved the contour and even apparent texture of her skin, making her look noticeably younger. In addition, the overall effect was completed with a rhinoplasty focused on reducing the width, rounding, and thickness of her tip and nostrils which is a challenge in the setting of thick skin.
This photo gallery represents a cross-section of my rhinoplasty practice and includes patients of different age, gender, nasal shape, and ethnic background. This gallery is not a collection of my best rhinoplasty outcomes, but rather a representative sampling of my typical cosmetic result. In addition, a majority of these patients also had simultaneous correction of severe nasal breathing difficulties, which cannot be appreciated in photographs.
I had wrongly assumed he could simply flatten the hump and be done, but he explained that you can't sculpt one area without considering how it'll impact everything else. If he smoothed the bridge and did nothing else, my nose could wind up looking far too wide from the front. So ultimately, he would need to break my nose and seamlessly draw it in closer to create the precise size and shape I was after. He'd also have to reduce the cartilage at the tip and turn it up slightly, from 91 to 93 degrees. In the end, my nose would be smaller, with a straighter bridge, a refined tip, and more clearly defined nostrils.
Some might think that this patient had had previous rhinoplasty with tip collapse, but she did not. Occasionally, the shape of the tip cartilages is very vertically-oriented, causing a deep groove in the nostril. She felt this, along with her marked tip crookedness, drew unwanted attention to her nose. Now, her nose is smaller, smoother, more defined, and just blends with the rest of her face.
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