Both breast reduction and breast lift surgeries are similar in that they both serve to reshape the breasts. Breast lift, through any of the various techniques, basically serves to reposition the breast and nipple on the chest to reverse the effects of time and gravity. The same changes that are noted in ptotic, or sagging, breasts are often seen in large breasts that require reduction: the nipple position is often low and there is excess skin (in addition to the excess breast tissue). The breast reduction then combines a lift with removal of extra tissue to create a breast that has a higher nipple position, reduced extra skin, and smaller and more balanced breast size.

As with any medical/surgical treatment, individual results may vary. Only a surgeon/physician can determine whether reconstruction or augmentation>is an appropriate course of treatment. The following are general adverse events associated with breast implant surgery: Device Rupture, Capsular contracture, Infection, Hematoma/Seroma, Pain, Reoperation, Implant removal, changes in Nipple and Breast Sensation, unsatisfactory results, breast-feeding complications. Other reported conditions are listed in the Product Insert Data Sheet (PIDS). See full list in the PIDS for the product information. These potential adverse events, including contraindications, warnings, and precautions need to be discussed with your doctor prior to surgery.

In the mid-twentieth century, Morton I. Berson, in 1945, and Jacques Maliniac, in 1950, each performed flap-based breast augmentations by rotating the patient's chest wall tissue into the breast to increase its volume. Furthermore, throughout the 1950s and the 1960s, plastic surgeons used synthetic fillers—including silicone injections received by some 50,000 women, from which developed silicone granulomas and breast hardening that required treatment by mastectomy.[112] In 1961, the American plastic surgeons Thomas Cronin and Frank Gerow, and the Dow Corning Corporation, developed the first silicone breast prosthesis, filled with silicone gel; in due course, the first augmentation mammoplasty was performed in 1962 using the Cronin–Gerow Implant, prosthesis model 1963. In 1964, the French company Laboratoires Arion developed and manufactured the saline breast implant, filled with saline solution, and then introduced for use as a medical device in 1964.[88]


Your primary augmentation is not the only cost you need to factor in when you are asking how much do breast implants cost. Women with silicone gel breast implants must factor in long term maintenance costs. Silicone gel breast implants can have “silent ruptures,” where an implant ruptures without showing any symptoms. The FDA recommends women with silicone gel implants get an MRI scan three years after getting their implants, then every two years for the life of the implant to detect silent ruptures. If a silicone gel implant ruptures, you will need surgery to remove the implant shell and any leaked silicone gel. It is important to remove implants that have ruptured because the silicone gel may begin to leak outside of the capsule and cause painful symptoms. The FDA lists a few of these symptoms as, “a decrease in breast size, change in breast implant shape, hard lumps over the implant or chest area, an uneven appearance of the breasts, pain or tenderness, tingling, swelling, numbness, burning, or changes in sensation.” However, because of the out-of-pocket cost of MRIs, many women skip their recommended MRI scans. According to Business Insider the average cost of an MRI is $444 to $1468. That means if a woman with silicone gel breast implants keeps up with the recommended MRIs she will pay on average $3,108 to $10,276 just for MRIs if her implants stay intact for 20 years. That puts the total cost of silicone gel breast implants closer to $10,000-$20,000 over 20 years, and even more if a revision surgery is needed.

Both saline-filled breast implants and silicone-filled implants have an outer shell composed of silicone elastomer. This shell is basically a flexible envelope that contains the implant filling. In the case of some anatomically shaped implants, the shell also gives the implants shape. Some models of implants have a "double lumen." This is an elastomer envelope inside of another elastomer envelope (sort of like double-bagging your groceries) which may reduce the risk of implant rupture.
Case 96: To see how well our results last, see these photos of our patient 8 years after rhinoplasty and facial fat transfer! Her rhinoplasty involved softening her look and removing the convexity on the bridge that made her tip look downturned. Fat transfer under the eyes has stood the test of time and really helped to reduce her under eye hollows to noticeably brighten her appearance.
When compared to the results achieved with a silicone-gel breast implant, the saline implant can yield acceptable results, of increased breast-size, smoother hemisphere-contour, and realistic texture; yet, it is likelier to cause cosmetic problems, such as the rippling and the wrinkling of the breast-envelope skin, accelerated lower breast pole stretch, and technical problems, such as the presence of the implant being noticeable to the eye and to the touch. The occurrence of such cosmetic problems is likelier in the case of the woman with very little breast tissue, and in the case of the woman who requires post-mastectomy breast reconstruction; thus, the silicone-gel implant is the technically superior prosthetic device for breast augmentation, and for breast reconstruction. In the case of the woman with much breast tissue, for whom sub-muscular emplacement is the recommended surgical approach, saline breast implants can produce an aesthetic result much like that afforded by silicone breast implants, albeit with greater implant palpability.[90]
A woman wanting a reduction comes usually after having put up with the pain and in some cases embarrassment and hassle for years before she presents in front of surgeon. She experiences neck, back, shoulder pain, skin irritation and even infection, she feels self conscious and sick of breasts getting in the way of a normal life/shopping/exercising. 

Case 12: One of the things that we love about rhinoplasty is that we can combine dramatic changes such as straightening this patient’s nasal twist, and at the same time create some subtle enhancements such as refining and slightly deprojecting the tip while reducing the sense of columellar show. At 6 months, her nose now balances with her face and really brings out her beautiful eyes.
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