A portion of fat will naturally absorb and effectively “disappear” as you heal. In order to prevent fat from reabsorbing, there shouldn’t be too much movement of the injected area right after surgery. Areas that shift a lot, like the lips, typically don’t hold on to fat very well. Pressure is also bad—fat that is injected into the butt can easily dissipate if patients sit on their bottoms a lot during the first couple weeks of recovery, says Ganchi. Ganchi tell his patients they either have to lay on their stomach or stand for the first four weeks after surgery (yes, really!). And since fat can absorb unevenly, some patients need more than one injection session to even things out—adding up to even more money spent.
Unfortunately, as time goes on it is often difficult for patients to remember the specifics of the type of breast augmentation surgery and implants that they had.  Your are not alone!  The easiest way to determine what type of implant you had is to request a copy of the operative report from either the hospital, surgery center or your surgeon's office.  The implant specifics are recorded on this document.  Your office record also includes this information.  If it has been over ten years since your procedure, sometimes these records are no longer available.  Ultrasound or MRI can help to answer this question but it is an expensive way to solve the mystery and not an indication for these procedures.  If you registered your implants with the manufacturer at the time of surgery, the company will have a record of this information.  Fortunately, this inforation is not absoltely critical to your health unless you are having a problem with your implants.  Your surgeon can often develop a reasonable treatment plan even without this information.  I would strongly recommend that you register your implants and purchase the affordable insurance program if you have surgery again.  These programs are helpful in storing vital information regarding your implant type, size, filler, model and lot number.  Should there be a recall or long term problem requiring additional surgery, this information is readily available.  There is often also some fiancial support to offset costs.  Investigate the options available by contacting your surgeon or the implant manufacturer's websites.
If you’re hoping your breast implants will be covered by insurance because of something like asymmetry or changes after pregnancy, you probably need to explore other financing options. Breast implants are considered cosmetic surgery, so insurance companies typically won’t cover them. However, “Breast Implants are covered if they are being used as part of reconstruction after breast cancer or mastectomy,” says Houston plastic surgeon Dr. C. Bob Basu in a RealSelf Q&A.
2009 European Union International Committee for Quality Assurance, Medical Technologies & Devices in Plastic Surgery panel (IQUAM) The consensus statement of the Transatlantic Innovations conference (April 2009) indicated that additional medical studies demonstrated no association between silicone gel-filled breast implants and carcinoma, or any metabolic, immune, or allergic disorder.[38]
2000 European Union European Committee on Quality Assurance & Medical Devices in Plastic Surgery (EQUAM) "Additional medical studies have not demonstrated any association between silicone-gel filled breast implants and traditional auto-immune or connective tissue diseases, cancer, nor any other malignant disease. . . . EQUAM continues to believe that there is no scientific evidence that silicone allergy, silicone intoxication, atypical disease or a 'new silicone disease' exists."[34]

Fat transfer surgery is a hot topic among today’s elite plastic surgeons. Dr. Mess researched and trained in fat transfer during her six-year residency at Georgetown University Hospital and incorporated the procedure early in her practice. She has refined her technique to offer the advantages of fat transfer to augment and reconstruct. Dr. Mess performs fat transfer to the face, breast, hands, and buttocks to add volume and fullness and restore a youthful and vigorous appearance.
In 1999, the Institute of Medicine published the Safety of Silicone Breast Implants (1999) study that reported no evidence that saline-filled and silicone-gel filled breast implant devices caused systemic health problems; that their use posed no new health or safety risks; and that local complications are “the primary safety issue with silicone breast implants”, in distinguishing among routine and local medical complications and systemic health concerns.”[113][114][115]
The plastic surgical emplacement of breast implant devices, either for breast reconstruction or for aesthetic purpose, presents the same health risks common to surgery, such as adverse reaction to anesthesia, hematoma (post-operative bleeding), late hematoma (post-operative bleeding after 6 months or more),[21] seroma (fluid accumulation), incision-site breakdown (wound infection). Complications specific to breast augmentation include breast pain, altered sensation, impeded breast-feeding function, visible wrinkling, asymmetry, thinning of the breast tissue, and symmastia, the “bread loafing” of the bust that interrupts the natural plane between the breasts. Specific treatments for the complications of indwelling breast implants—capsular contracture and capsular rupture—are periodic MRI monitoring and physical examinations. Furthermore, complications and re-operations related to the implantation surgery, and to tissue expanders (implant place-holders during surgery) can cause unfavorable scarring in approximately 6–7 per cent of the patients. [22][23][24] Statistically, 20 per cent of women who underwent cosmetic implantation, and 50 per cent of women who underwent breast reconstruction implantation, required their explantation at the 10-year mark.[25]
A curvature and droopy tip brings undue focus to this young man’s nose. Although there is still some swelling in these early post-operative photos, we can already see a nose that is now straight, has a smooth profile and no longer droops. A sense of length is preserved to match his oval face. More than that, because of these positive changes, he also looks younger.
Case 71: Tip and nostril width and overall nasal projection made the nose feel dominant for this young woman. Rhinoplasty involved making her whole nose smaller by deprojecting, refining the tip, and removing some nostril flare. At the same time, a nasal fracture and breathing concerns were addressed. Neck Liposuction also helped to define and re-balance her jawline to create the improved facial proportions that she desired.
Case 34: Hispanic Rhinoplasty in this patient meant removal of a high dorsal bump on profile and correction of a droopy-appearing tip. On front view, there is correction of a left nasal bone fracture and refinement of the nasal tip. All of this was done while still maintaining her unique individuality and while bearing in mind the various challenges Rhinoplasty in Latino patients present- thicker skin and softer cartilage.
Dr. Larry Fan is a Harvard educated, Board Certified Plastic Surgeon in San Francisco, CA. He is a Master Artist who is known for creating beautiful, stunning, and natural results. Dr. Fan has been named One of America's Top Plastic Surgeons for the past 10 years running and has received several national awards for his work in Plastic Surgery. He has successfully performed more than 10,000 cosmetic procedures of the face, breasts, and body over a 20 year period. Dr Fan has been an invited speaker at the American Society of Plastic Surgeons and the American College of Surgeons, and has been featured in national media outlets such as CNN, NBC, and ABC.
© 2019 Condé Nast. All rights reserved. Use of this site constitutes acceptance of our User Agreement (updated 5/25/18) and Privacy Policy and Cookie Statement (updated 5/25/18) and Your California Privacy Rights. Allure may earn a portion of sales from products that are purchased through our site as part of our Affiliate Partnerships with retailers. The material on this site may not be reproduced, distributed, transmitted, cached or otherwise used, except with the prior written permission of Condé Nast. Ad Choices
During your consultation, your surgeon will ask about your habits, including whether or not you smoke and what medications you take. You may have to quit smoking for a period before and after surgery to ensure proper healing. You also may have to stop taking certain medications, such as aspirin or other anti-inflammatory drugs such as Motrin or Aleve. Your surgeon will give you instructions about what you need to do.
Before surgery, friends and family would say they didn't see anything wrong with my nose, but to have something that's so personal and integral to you feel so wrong...it's exhausting and disheartening. Now I feel not only more beautiful but way more comfortable in my own skin — just like my mom. And now those same friends see the difference and compliment me. 

Thank you for your question its hard to answer your question without pictures or an evaluation. I my experience the more fat transferred the better results.  Areas to consider would be your abdomen, back bra rolls and flanks at times Inner Thighs and Knees. This would be based on your current projection and how much fat you have to give. Removing the fat from the back bra rolls and waist alone can greatly improve your overall shape and enhance your curves. Once your waistline is more defined like an hourglass you will be able to see your buttock shape. Then once the fat is transferred to the buttock you will get more projection. It's best to consult with a Board Certified Plastic Surgeon to get an examination to assess the areas and outcome. Best of luck.

The current lifetime risk of BIA-ALCL in the U.S. is unknown, but estimates have ranged between estimated to be between 1 in 70,000 to 1 in 500,000 women with breast implants according to MD Anderson.[73] Certain geographic locations have demonstrated variable risks. For instance, a December 2016 update from the Therapeutic Goods Administration of Australia and New Zealand reported a risk of 1:1,000 to 1:10,000 for textured implants.".[71] To date (2017), there has not been a case of BIAL reported where the patient had only implantation of smooth shell breast implants or a textured tissue expander that was exchanged for a smooth implant. The paucity of cases reported in Asian populations has raised the possibility that there may be a range of genetic susceptibility to the phenomena, or alternatively merely reflect differences in how cases are identified and reported.

×