Platinum is a catalyst used in the making of silicone implant polymer shells and other silicone devices used in medicine. The literature indicates that small amounts of platinum leaches (leaks) from these implants and is present in the surrounding tissue. The FDA reviewed the available studies from the medical literature on platinum and breast implants in 2002 and concluded there was little evidence suggesting toxicity from platinum in implant patients.[67] The FDA revisited this study and additional literature several years later, reaffirming prior conclusions that platinum catalysts used in implants is likely not ionized and therefore would not represent a risk to women.[68]
The purpose of fat grafting is to augment or fill in volume-deficient areas. Commonly grafted, or injected, areas include the hands, face (including the lips), depressions in the skin (following liposuction and scarring) and the breast and buttock (for augmentation). Of course, you must have donor sites from which fat can be taken. It is important that you do not have any circulation problems, either from a medical condition or smoking.

These placements vary from shallow (subglandular) to deep (complete submuscular). The right placement for your breast implants is based on your anatomy as well as your goals and expectations. You should express your desires to your surgeon, but make sure to take his or her expert opinion into account. Improper implant placement can create complications such as breast augmentation double bubble, wrinkles and rippling.


For detailed indications, contraindications, warnings, and precautions associated with the use of all MENTOR® Implantable Devices, which include MENTOR® Saline-filled Implants, MemoryGel® Implants, MemoryShape® Implants, ARTOURA™ Expanders, and CONTOUR PROFILE® Expanders, please refer to the Instructions for Use (IFU) provided with each product or visit www.mentorwwllc.com.
A curvature and droopy tip brings undue focus to this young man’s nose. Although there is still some swelling in these early post-operative photos, we can already see a nose that is now straight, has a smooth profile and no longer droops. A sense of length is preserved to match his oval face. More than that, because of these positive changes, he also looks younger.
This includes the cost of the implants, which ranges from $1,000 to $1,300 as well as a facility fee of $800 to $1,200, an anesthesia fee of $600 to $800 and the surgeon's fee that averages $4,005 for silicone-gel filled implants and $3,583 for saline implants. Patients in the western United States can expect to pay the highest average surgeon's fee of about $3,949, while patients in the south central part of the country generally pay lower fees with an average of $2,739.
Many different types of breast lifts are now available in conjunction with a breast reduction, including lifts just around the areola (periareolar), vertical/lollipop mastopexies (incision around the areola and down to the breast fold, and full breast lifts with an anchor incision. For patients who have very loose skin in the armpit or back, axillary or bra lifts are also often combined with breast reductions.
the second technological development was a polyurethane foam coating for the shell of the breast implant; the coating reduced the incidence of capsular contracture, by causing an inflammatory reaction that impeded the formation of a capsule of fibrous collagen tissue around the breast implant. Nevertheless, despite that prophylactic measure, the medical use of polyurethane-coated breast implants was briefly discontinued, because of the potential health-risk posed by 2,4-toluenediamine (TDA), a carcinogenic by-product of the chemical breakdown of the polyurethane foam coating of the breast implant.[92]
While more experienced surgeons may charge more for their expertise, that’s not always the case. “You should not choose a qualified surgeon based on high fees any more than you should choose one based on low fees,” says Boca Raton, Florida plastic surgeon Dr. Hilton Becker in a RealSelf Q&A. “The most important factors should be education, experience, certification, and your ability to feel comfortable with your surgeon.”
In 1999, the Institute of Medicine published the Safety of Silicone Breast Implants (1999) study that reported no evidence that saline-filled and silicone-gel filled breast implant devices caused systemic health problems; that their use posed no new health or safety risks; and that local complications are “the primary safety issue with silicone breast implants”, in distinguishing among routine and local medical complications and systemic health concerns.”[113][114][115]

The morning of surgery, I was definitely feeling nervous, but the jitters had actually set in full force the week before. I was mostly anxious about getting everything together and making sure I was as prepared as possible for the recovery period. My biggest worry was the unknown: How would I look and feel? How would others react to seeing me? And there were, of course, some second thoughts, like, Do I really need this? Is this actually going to make me happier and more self-confident? I was even feeling a little guilty about the superficial nature of the whole thing — like, a nose job is not something I truly need. But I knew if I decided, last minute, to pull the plug on the operation, I'd regret it, because I'd still be unhappy with my nose — and that realization outweighed all of my fears.
After reviewing the medical data, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration concluded that TDA-induced breast cancer was an infinitesimal health-risk to women with breast implants, and did not justify legally requiring physicians to explain the matter to their patients. In the event, polyurethane-coated breast implants remain in plastic surgery practice in Europe and in South America; and no manufacturer has sought FDA approval for medical sales of such breast implants in the U.S.[93]
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