Once we set a date for surgery, Dr. Kolker prescribed various vitamins (C, B12, and zinc) to start taking one week prior to surgery to prep my body for the trauma and help speed recovery. I'd have to avoid red wine and blood thinners (like Advil) for two weeks beforehand. He prescribed pain medication, too, but said I may only need Tylenol post-op because the discomfort isn't all that bad. There would be lots of bruising and swelling, but after six weeks, he said, my appearance should be back to normal, only with a better nose. After three months, I'd be 75 percent healed, but the swelling wouldn't fully subside for one year.
Before I left his office, Dr. Kolker took me through some before-and-after shots of some of his rhinoplasty patients. Many of them had noses similar to mine, and their "after" pictures were much like the ones Dr. Kolker had generated for me. He told me that of all the nose jobs he'd done in his career, only one time did he have to go back and operate again, and that was because the patient wanted a more drastic change. That clinched it for me: I knew I was in good hands and that my result would be subtle and not overly "done."
Deciding how much fat to transfer to a patient’s buttocks is a decision made by the surgeon that takes safety, cosmetic result, and patient’s goals into account. I recommend reviewing your goals of surgery, by showing photos, or performing Vectra imaging in office, with your surgeon and listening to their recommendations for the safest, best-looking results possible.
Transaxillary: an incision made to the axilla (armpit), from which the dissection tunnels medially, to emplace the implants, either bluntly or with an endoscope (illuminated video microcamera), without producing visible scars on the breast proper; yet, it is likelier to produce inferior asymmetry of the implant-device position. Therefore, surgical revision of transaxillary emplaced breast implants usually requires either an IMF incision or a periareolar incision.
If you have considerable sagging, pendulous breasts, an anchor lift, which allows a cosmetic surgeon to remove a significant amount of excess skin and sagging tissues, may yield the best results. This technique involves 3 incisions: one around the edge of the areola, one vertically from the bottom of the areola to the breast crease, and one along the inframammary fold, hidden in the breast crease. Your cosmetic surgeon may also use this technique if you are having a breast reduction with lift. While the anchor lift comes with some visible scarring, these typically will fade significantly with proper care, and are easily hidden by a bikini top.
Dr. Mess performs fat transfer to the face to fill facial hollows and lines as a standalone procedure or in addition to neck lift or blepharoplasty. Fat transfer to the face is a more permanent and more natural alternative to fillers. Fat transfer to the hands can restore volume and provide a more youthful-looking hand. During your consultation, you will discuss your goals and expectations and review photographs to understand the plan.
1996 France Agence Nationale pour le Developpement de l’Evaluation Medicale (ANDEM) [National Agency for Medical Development and Evaluation][30] French original: "Nous n'avons pas observé de connectivité ni d'autre pathologie auto-immune susceptible d'être directement ou indirectement induite par la présence d'un implant mammaire en particulier en gel de silicone...."
Case 48: This is a good example of finesse rhinoplasty where subtle changes can make for a very nice and meaningful difference. This young woman liked the overall shape of her nose but wanted it slightly smaller in all dimensions to match her pretty, petite features. We were able to achieve these goals by always relying on techniques that produce stable and precise results. Subtle fat transfer to the under eye area further helped to reduce under eye circles and soften her overall look.
The breast cancer studies Cancer in the Augmented Breast: Diagnosis and Prognosis (1993) and Breast Cancer after Augmentation Mammoplasty (2001) of women with breast implant prostheses reported no significant differences in disease-stage at the time of the diagnosis of cancer; prognoses are similar in both groups of women, with augmented patients at a lower risk for subsequent cancer recurrence or death.[103][104] Conversely, the use of implants for breast reconstruction after breast cancer mastectomy appears to have no negative effect upon the incidence of cancer-related death.[105] That patients with breast implants are more often diagnosed with palpable—but not larger—tumors indicates that equal-sized tumors might be more readily palpated in augmented patients, which might compensate for the impaired mammogram images.[106] The ready palpability of the breast-cancer tumor(s) is consequent to breast tissue thinning by compression, innately in smaller breasts a priori (because they have lesser tissue volumes), and that the implant serves as a radio-opaque base against which a cancerous tumor can be differentiated.[107]
Unfortunately, as time goes on it is often difficult for patients to remember the specifics of the type of breast augmentation surgery and implants that they had.  Your are not alone!  The easiest way to determine what type of implant you had is to request a copy of the operative report from either the hospital, surgery center or your surgeon's office.  The implant specifics are recorded on this document.  Your office record also includes this information.  If it has been over ten years since your procedure, sometimes these records are no longer available.  Ultrasound or MRI can help to answer this question but it is an expensive way to solve the mystery and not an indication for these procedures.  If you registered your implants with the manufacturer at the time of surgery, the company will have a record of this information.  Fortunately, this inforation is not absoltely critical to your health unless you are having a problem with your implants.  Your surgeon can often develop a reasonable treatment plan even without this information.  I would strongly recommend that you register your implants and purchase the affordable insurance program if you have surgery again.  These programs are helpful in storing vital information regarding your implant type, size, filler, model and lot number.  Should there be a recall or long term problem requiring additional surgery, this information is readily available.  There is often also some fiancial support to offset costs.  Investigate the options available by contacting your surgeon or the implant manufacturer's websites.
A great question that comes up often.  A breast reduction will both reduce the breast size and improve the shape of the breast while lifting it.  During this surgery, breast tissue is removed while preserving the tissue around the nipple.  The breast is then shaped and nipple placed in a higher, more ideal position.  This is essentially the breast lift component of this surgery.  With the reduction, we are accomplishing both. Hope this helps. 
A curvature and droopy tip brings undue focus to this young man’s nose. Although there is still some swelling in these early post-operative photos, we can already see a nose that is now straight, has a smooth profile and no longer droops. A sense of length is preserved to match his oval face. More than that, because of these positive changes, he also looks younger.
Transaxillary: an incision made to the axilla (armpit), from which the dissection tunnels medially, to emplace the implants, either bluntly or with an endoscope (illuminated video microcamera), without producing visible scars on the breast proper; yet, it is likelier to produce inferior asymmetry of the implant-device position. Therefore, surgical revision of transaxillary emplaced breast implants usually requires either an IMF incision or a periareolar incision.
Yes the eyes have it. When I think about a person’s beauty I am immediately struck by their eyes and the skin surrounding them. Unfortunately nothing causes a person to show their age like wrinkles and dark circles in the eye area. Case in point, my beautiful mother-in-law passed her genetic material to my husband, who just like she did, bears sunken-in dark-colored eye sockets which magnify the aging skin under his eyes. 
×