After reviewing the medical data, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration concluded that TDA-induced breast cancer was an infinitesimal health-risk to women with breast implants, and did not justify legally requiring physicians to explain the matter to their patients. In the event, polyurethane-coated breast implants remain in plastic surgery practice in Europe and in South America; and no manufacturer has sought FDA approval for medical sales of such breast implants in the U.S.[93]
Unfortunately, as time goes on it is often difficult for patients to remember the specifics of the type of breast augmentation surgery and implants that they had.  Your are not alone!  The easiest way to determine what type of implant you had is to request a copy of the operative report from either the hospital, surgery center or your surgeon's office.  The implant specifics are recorded on this document.  Your office record also includes this information.  If it has been over ten years since your procedure, sometimes these records are no longer available.  Ultrasound or MRI can help to answer this question but it is an expensive way to solve the mystery and not an indication for these procedures.  If you registered your implants with the manufacturer at the time of surgery, the company will have a record of this information.  Fortunately, this inforation is not absoltely critical to your health unless you are having a problem with your implants.  Your surgeon can often develop a reasonable treatment plan even without this information.  I would strongly recommend that you register your implants and purchase the affordable insurance program if you have surgery again.  These programs are helpful in storing vital information regarding your implant type, size, filler, model and lot number.  Should there be a recall or long term problem requiring additional surgery, this information is readily available.  There is often also some fiancial support to offset costs.  Investigate the options available by contacting your surgeon or the implant manufacturer's websites.
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The saline breast implant—filled with saline solution (biological-concentration salt water 0.90% w/v of NaCl, ca. 300 mOsm/L.)—was first manufactured by the Laboratoires Arion company, in France, and was introduced for use as a prosthetic medical device in 1964. The contemporary models of saline breast implant are manufactured with thicker, room-temperature vulcanized (RTV) shells made of a silicone elastomer. The study In vitro Deflation of Pre-filled Saline Breast Implants (2006) reported that the rates of deflation (filler leakage) of the pre-filled saline breast implant made it a second-choice prosthesis for corrective breast surgery.[88] Nonetheless, in the 1990s, the saline breast implant was the prosthesis most common device used for breast augmentation surgery in the United States, because of the U.S. FDA's restriction against the implantation of silicone-filled breast implants outside of clinical studies. Saline breast implants have enjoyed little popularity in the rest of the world, possessing negligible market share.
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Unfortunately, as time goes on it is often difficult for patients to remember the specifics of the type of breast augmentation surgery and implants that they had.  Your are not alone!  The easiest way to determine what type of implant you had is to request a copy of the operative report from either the hospital, surgery center or your surgeon's office.  The implant specifics are recorded on this document.  Your office record also includes this information.  If it has been over ten years since your procedure, sometimes these records are no longer available.  Ultrasound or MRI can help to answer this question but it is an expensive way to solve the mystery and not an indication for these procedures.  If you registered your implants with the manufacturer at the time of surgery, the company will have a record of this information.  Fortunately, this inforation is not absoltely critical to your health unless you are having a problem with your implants.  Your surgeon can often develop a reasonable treatment plan even without this information.  I would strongly recommend that you register your implants and purchase the affordable insurance program if you have surgery again.  These programs are helpful in storing vital information regarding your implant type, size, filler, model and lot number.  Should there be a recall or long term problem requiring additional surgery, this information is readily available.  There is often also some fiancial support to offset costs.  Investigate the options available by contacting your surgeon or the implant manufacturer's websites.
Case 92: This procedure was all about correction of a droopy twisted tip. This patient was especially bothered by the tip’s tendency to drop and spread when she smiled, with a twist that made one nostril look higher than the other. After surgery, her nose is about as straight and symmetric as can be and the straighter bridge line makes her look younger.
Your surgeon can change the shape of your nasal bones or cartilage in several ways, depending on how much needs to be removed or added, your nose's structure, and available materials. For small changes, the surgeon may use cartilage taken from deeper inside your nose or from your ear. For larger changes, the surgeon can use cartilage from your rib, implants or bone from other parts of your body. After these changes are made, the surgeon places the nose's skin and tissue back and stitches the incisions in your nose.

Case 31: This patient had some typical concerns of feeling washed out from the front with flattening and spreading of her tip. She was very happy with the narrowing and definition achieved for her bridge and tip along with nostril reduction. In addition, chin augmentation increased chin projection to improve the balance of her lower face and jawline.
Because you’re injecting your body with something produced by your body, some people consider it “natural” plastic surgery, and it’s increasing in popularity. Breast augmentation using fat transfer increased 72 percent in 2016 while buttock augmentation using fat transfer increased by 26 percent, according to the American Society of Plastic Surgeons.

No. Rhinoplasty is a challenging operation. This is due to several factors. First, the nose is a complicated 3D shape that is in the middle of the face. Changes made during rhinoplasty are often very small. But these changes can make a major difference in the way the nose looks and functions. Because these changes are small, so is the margin for error.


Each year, hundreds of thousands of women undergo breast implant surgery, a plastic surgery procedure designed to improve the appearance of the breasts. Also called breast augmentation surgery, most women undergo the procedure to enlarge breasts that are naturally small, though some have it to correct disproportionate breasts or repair breast deformities.
It is certainly possible to lift a breast without changing the volume or removing any tissue, however, the breast will sometimes appear smaller after this procedure due to its position. It is also possible to reduce breast volume without lifting the tissue (usually via liposuction) but all reductions that are performed by making incisions will also include a lift.
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