This includes the cost of the implants, which ranges from $1,000 to $1,300 as well as a facility fee of $800 to $1,200, an anesthesia fee of $600 to $800 and the surgeon's fee that averages $4,005 for silicone-gel filled implants and $3,583 for saline implants. Patients in the western United States can expect to pay the highest average surgeon's fee of about $3,949, while patients in the south central part of the country generally pay lower fees with an average of $2,739.
Case 43: Rhinoplasty in this pretty professional woman was all about removing the bump she had hated for years and correcting the tip droop and asymmetry that had worsened with age. Relatively small changes here have created a real sense of refinement while maintaining her long, elegant profile. A lower face and neck lift along with facial fat transfer helped to round out the enhancements in her already beautiful appearance.
Breast augmentation: If you desire a modest increase in breast size, you are a good candidate for fat grafting to the breast, but your breasts should already have a nice shape and good skin tone. If you have poor skin, sagging breasts, or want a significant increase in breast size, breast augmentation with fat transfer is not for you. The problem with only using fat for breast enhancement lies in getting large volumes of fat to predictably “take.”
For detailed indications, contraindications, warnings, and precautions associated with the use of all MENTOR® Implantable Devices, which include MENTOR® Saline-filled Implants, MemoryGel® Implants, MemoryShape® Implants, ARTOURA™ Expanders, and CONTOUR PROFILE® Expanders, please refer to the Instructions for Use (IFU) provided with each product or visit www.mentorwwllc.com.

In the past, concerns emerged that silicone implants posed health risks, including an increased risk of systemic diseases such as lupus and arthritis. The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) placed a moratorium on silicone implants in 1992 so the safety of these devices could be studied. However, in 2006 the agency concluded that there was no evidence of risk and lifted the moratorium.


For the second part....it depends where your butt is starting at. There is a point in which there is too much pressure in the butt that no more fat can really be injected. Pressure kills the fat cells (which is why you cannot sit on the butt for a few weeks after surgery). It also means that we cannot just keep injecting if the gluteus has fully expanded and is not able to take any more. If you are starting with a small butt.....there is a smaller limit. If you are starting with a medium sized butt.....there is a bigger limit. I like to use power assisted "vibration expansion filling" to really push the boundaries of how much fat can be injected into the buttocks. This helps to expand the buttocks on the table and get more fat into more stubborn areas. Typically, even for smaller girls, I will inject at least 1000ml per side (and up to 1600ml for larger girls). After this, as you have probably read, 30-50% of the fat will either reabsorb or "not take". However, with the removal of a large amount of fat around your midsection combined with careful technique and contouring of the butt and hips, we can make a very large difference in your overall proportion. Best of luck to you!
Breast implants are not lifetime devices. The longer a woman has implants, the more likely it is that she will need to have surgery to remove or replace them. The most frequent complications and adverse outcomes experienced by breast implant patients include capsular contracture, reoperation, and implant removal (with or without replacement). Other common complications include implant rupture with deflation, wrinkling, asymmetry, scarring, pain, and infection. In addition, women with breast implants may have a very low but increased likelihood of being diagnosed with anaplastic large cell lymphoma (ALCL).

Silicone implant rupture can be evaluated using magnetic resonance imaging; from the long-term MRI data for single-lumen breast implants, the European literature about second generation silicone-gel breast implants (1970s design), reported silent device-rupture rates of 8–15 per cent at 10-years post-implantation (15–30% of the patients).[45][46][47][48]
The amount of good quality, transferrable fat will depend on how much can be retrieved from the donor sites. This can be partially estimated after examination (the surgeon inspects and pinches the areas of potential fat harvest to get an idea of how much fat can realistically be harvested), but it is hard to know for sure until the procedure is well underway. Abdominal and love handle/flank fat tend to be the best sources because the fat is more easily retrieved and softer than back fat, but the back is also routinely liposuctioned in the BBL procedure to both obtain extra tissue for transfer and to improve the 360 degree shaping of the torso. I have transferred anywhere from 300cc per buttock to over 1200 in some patients, depending on the circumstances.
A fat grafting procedure, or fat injection, transfers fat from areas in which you have excess fat, such as the outer thighs, and injects it into areas that may be lacking in volume, such as your face, hands, breasts or buttocks. This safe, long-lasting, well-tolerated procedure produces natural-looking results. Every year, thousands of people undergo successful fat grafting and are pleased with the results.

Since the early 1990s, a number of independent systemic comprehensive reviews have examined studies concerning links between silicone gel breast implants and claims of systemic diseases. The consensus of these reviews (outlined below under Safety of Breast Implants heading) is that there has been no evidence of a causal link between the implantation of saline or silicone breast implants and systemic disease After investigating this issue, the U.S. FDA has concurred and since reaffirmed that “the weight of the epidemiological evidence published in the literature does not support an association between fibromyalgia and breast implants.”. A comprehensive systemic review by Lipworth (2011) [66] concludes that "any claims that remain regarding an association between cosmetic breast implants and CTDs are not supported by the scientific literature".
Furthermore, The Effect of Study design Biases on the Diagnostic Accuracy of Magnetic Resonance Imaging for Detecting Silicone Breast Implant Ruptures: a Meta-analysis (2011) reported that the breast-screening MRIs of asymptomatic women might overestimate the incidence of breast implant rupture.[53] In the event, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration emphasised that “breast implants are not lifetime devices. The longer a woman has silicone gel-filled breast implants, the more likely she is to experience complications.”[54]
Another option is to consider getting your breast implants at a teaching hospital from a learning resident. You won’t get the delicate skill of an experienced, board-certified surgeon, but teaching hospital residents are “assisted by established, experienced, private attending surgeons,” says Beverly Hills plastic surgeon Dr. Robin T.W. Yuan in a RealSelf Q&A.
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