Inframammary: an incision made to the inframammary fold (natural crease under your breast), which affords maximal access for precise dissection of the tissues and emplacement of the breast implants. It is the preferred surgical technique for emplacing silicone-gel implants, because it better exposes the breast tissue–pectoralis muscle interface; yet, IMF implantation can produce thicker, slightly more visible surgical scars.
Having a breast lift is similar to resetting the clock for sagging. Your breasts will still undergo natural changes due to the aging process, although with proper care you should not experience your previous level of sagging for many years. However, it is important to understand that certain life events, such as future pregnancy or weight fluctuations can negatively affect your results. If you are planning to have more children or you would like to lose weight, it is best to achieve these milestones before having a breast lift.

In the 1980s, the models of the Third and of the Fourth generations of breast implant devices were sequential advances in manufacturing technology, such as elastomer-coated shells that decreased gel-bleed (filler leakage), and a thicker (increased-cohesion) filler gel. Sociologically, the manufacturers of prosthetic breasts then designed and made anatomic models (natural breast) and shaped models (round, tapered) that realistically corresponded with the breast- and body- types of women. The tapered models of breast implant have a uniformly textured surface, which reduces the rotation of the prosthesis within the implant pocket; the round models of breast implant are available in smooth-surface- and textured-surface- types.

the second technological development was a polyurethane foam coating for the shell of the breast implant; the coating reduced the incidence of capsular contracture, by causing an inflammatory reaction that impeded the formation of a capsule of fibrous collagen tissue around the breast implant. Nevertheless, despite that prophylactic measure, the medical use of polyurethane-coated breast implants was briefly discontinued, because of the potential health-risk posed by 2,4-toluenediamine (TDA), a carcinogenic by-product of the chemical breakdown of the polyurethane foam coating of the breast implant.[92]


From the first half of the twentieth century, physicians used other substances as breast implant fillers—ivory, glass balls, ground rubber, ox cartilage, Terylene wool, gutta-percha, Dicora, polyethylene chips, Ivalon (polyvinyl alcohol—formaldehyde polymer sponge), a polyethylene sac with Ivalon, polyether foam sponge (Etheron), polyethylene tape (Polystan) strips wound into a ball, polyester (polyurethane foam sponge) Silastic rubber, and teflon-silicone prostheses.[111]


Fat transfer surgery is a hot topic among today’s elite plastic surgeons. Dr. Mess researched and trained in fat transfer during her six-year residency at Georgetown University Hospital and incorporated the procedure early in her practice. She has refined her technique to offer the advantages of fat transfer to augment and reconstruct. Dr. Mess performs fat transfer to the face, breast, hands, and buttocks to add volume and fullness and restore a youthful and vigorous appearance.
Having a breast lift is similar to resetting the clock for sagging. Your breasts will still undergo natural changes due to the aging process, although with proper care you should not experience your previous level of sagging for many years. However, it is important to understand that certain life events, such as future pregnancy or weight fluctuations can negatively affect your results. If you are planning to have more children or you would like to lose weight, it is best to achieve these milestones before having a breast lift.
A portion of fat will naturally absorb and effectively “disappear” as you heal. In order to prevent fat from reabsorbing, there shouldn’t be too much movement of the injected area right after surgery. Areas that shift a lot, like the lips, typically don’t hold on to fat very well. Pressure is also bad—fat that is injected into the butt can easily dissipate if patients sit on their bottoms a lot during the first couple weeks of recovery, says Ganchi. Ganchi tell his patients they either have to lay on their stomach or stand for the first four weeks after surgery (yes, really!). And since fat can absorb unevenly, some patients need more than one injection session to even things out—adding up to even more money spent.
Functional breast-feeding difficulties arise if the surgeon cut the milk ducts or the major nerves innervating the breast, or if the milk glands were otherwise damaged. Milk duct and nerve damage are more common if the incisions cut tissue near the nipple. The milk glands are most likely to be affected by subglandular implants (under the gland), and by large-sized breast implants, which pinch the lactiferous ducts and impede milk flow. Small-sized breast implants, and submuscular implantation, cause fewer breast-function problems; however, it is impossible to predict whether a woman who undergoes breast augmentation will be able to successfully breast feed since some women are able to breast-feed after periareolar incisions and subglandular placement and some are not able to after augmentation using submuscular and other types of surgical incisions.[101]
Since the late nineteenth century, breast implants have been used to surgically augment the size (volume), modify the shape (contour), and enhance the feel (tact) of a woman's breasts. In 1895, surgeon Vincenz Czerny effected the earliest breast implant emplacement when he used the patient's autologous adipose tissue, harvested from a benign lumbar lipoma, to repair the asymmetry of the breast from which he had removed a tumor.[110] In 1889, surgeon Robert Gersuny experimented with paraffin injections, with disastrous results.[further explanation needed]
Of course, the breast reduction vs. breast lift question is not really cut and dry because every woman is unique. You may be unsure of what volume you would like with the breasts in a more favorable position. Breasts may be different sizes (asymmetric). The position of the nipple may be out of proportion to the amount of breast sag. Breasts may be ‘deflated’ after pregnancy. You may have heard that breast implants are the only reliable way to lift breasts. These questions can easily be addressed at the time of your consult.

The correction of capsular contracture might require an open capsulotomy (surgical release) of the collagen-fiber capsule, or the removal, and possible replacement, of the breast implant. Furthermore, in treating capsular contracture, the closed capsulotomy (disruption via external manipulation) once was a common maneuver for treating hard capsules, but now is a discouraged technique, because it can rupture the breast implant. Non-surgical treatments for collagen-fiber capsules include massage, external ultrasonic therapy, leukotriene pathway inhibitors such as zafirlukast (Accolate) or montelukast (Singulair), and pulsed electromagnetic field therapy (PEMFT).[60][61][62][63]

Fill Filled with a highly cohesive gel for durable shape retention designed to give a youthful feel. Filled with a proprietary cohesive gel that hold together uniformly while retaining the natural give that resembles breast tissue. Filled with a saltwater solution similar to the fluid that makes up most of the human body; slightly firmer feel than gel.


Platinum is a catalyst used in the making of silicone implant polymer shells and other silicone devices used in medicine. The literature indicates that small amounts of platinum leaches (leaks) from these implants and is present in the surrounding tissue. The FDA reviewed the available studies from the medical literature on platinum and breast implants in 2002 and concluded there was little evidence suggesting toxicity from platinum in implant patients.[67] The FDA revisited this study and additional literature several years later, reaffirming prior conclusions that platinum catalysts used in implants is likely not ionized and therefore would not represent a risk to women.[68]
Women with ruptured silicone gel implants also need to factor in downtime when asking how much do breast implants cost. Whether you take time off work, hire a babysitter for your kids, or make other accommodations while you recover from surgery, you need to factor in these costs. Dr. Jane Rowley, a board-certified plastic surgeon in Lubbock, Texas, explains the difference between removal of silicone gel implants and the IDEAL IMPLANT, “there’s a big difference between removing a ruptured IDEAL IMPLANT and a ruptured silicone gel implant. A ruptured IDEAL IMPLANT can be removed easily with a local anesthetic. A silicone gel implant, if they’re not ruptured, can come out that easy. But if they are ruptured, most of the time its stuck, and it bleeds, and you have to put drains in. So it’s not an easy recovery, it’s not an easy surgery. With an IDEAL IMPLANT I can almost guarantee them ahead of time, if your implant is leaking it will be easy to remove and replace, you will be back to work in a day or two at the most. With a silicone gel implant I’ll say, ‘I don’t know what your recovery is going to be, it might come out easily, it might not come out easily. You might need to take week off work, you might have to take two days off work.’”
Before surgery, friends and family would say they didn't see anything wrong with my nose, but to have something that's so personal and integral to you feel so wrong...it's exhausting and disheartening. Now I feel not only more beautiful but way more comfortable in my own skin — just like my mom. And now those same friends see the difference and compliment me.
I love so many of my features. For instance, the green eyes I got from my mom, my naturally full lips, and smile, but my nose has been a source of insecurity. Around 15, as puberty hit, my nose just...changed. One day, it suddenly looked large and awkward, with a pronounced bump and protruding tip that I simply didn't identify with. I'd catch my profile in the mirror and be uncomfortable with the face staring back.
2000 European Union European Committee on Quality Assurance & Medical Devices in Plastic Surgery (EQUAM) "Additional medical studies have not demonstrated any association between silicone-gel filled breast implants and traditional auto-immune or connective tissue diseases, cancer, nor any other malignant disease. . . . EQUAM continues to believe that there is no scientific evidence that silicone allergy, silicone intoxication, atypical disease or a 'new silicone disease' exists."[34]

2000 European Union European Committee on Quality Assurance & Medical Devices in Plastic Surgery (EQUAM) "Additional medical studies have not demonstrated any association between silicone-gel filled breast implants and traditional auto-immune or connective tissue diseases, cancer, nor any other malignant disease. . . . EQUAM continues to believe that there is no scientific evidence that silicone allergy, silicone intoxication, atypical disease or a 'new silicone disease' exists."[34]
Another option is to consider getting your breast implants at a teaching hospital from a learning resident. You won’t get the delicate skill of an experienced, board-certified surgeon, but teaching hospital residents are “assisted by established, experienced, private attending surgeons,” says Beverly Hills plastic surgeon Dr. Robin T.W. Yuan in a RealSelf Q&A.
Both breast reduction and breast lift surgeries are similar in that they both serve to reshape the breasts. Breast lift, through any of the various techniques, basically serves to reposition the breast and nipple on the chest to reverse the effects of time and gravity. The same changes that are noted in ptotic, or sagging, breasts are often seen in large breasts that require reduction: the nipple position is often low and there is excess skin (in addition to the excess breast tissue). The breast reduction then combines a lift with removal of extra tissue to create a breast that has a higher nipple position, reduced extra skin, and smaller and more balanced breast size.
Breast lift surgery is typically performed as an outpatient procedure using general anesthesia or local anesthesia + intravenous sedation. The procedure takes about 1-2 hours to perform, depending on the extent of surgery. You will be able to go home shortly after surgery to continue your recovery. Your breasts will be bandaged or placed in a surgical bra.

It is certainly possible to lift a breast without changing the volume or removing any tissue, however, the breast will sometimes appear smaller after this procedure due to its position. It is also possible to reduce breast volume without lifting the tissue (usually via liposuction) but all reductions that are performed by making incisions will also include a lift.
The FDA has identified that breast implants may be associated with a rare form of cancer called anaplastic large-cell lymphoma, believed to be associated with chronic bacterial inflammation.[69] Similar ALCL phenomena have been seen with other types of medical implants including vascular access ports, orthopedic hip implants, and jaw (TMJ) implants. As of February 1, 2017, the FDA has received a total of 359 medical device reports of breast-implant-associated ALCL (BIALCL), including 9 deaths.[70] Most cases of breast implant-associated ALCL had implants in for many years prior to the condition, and are usually treated successfully by simple removal of the implant and the capsule surrounding the implant without the need for chemotherapy if no evidence of systemic disease exists. If women with implants present with delayed swelling or fluid collection, cytologic studies and test for a marker "CD30" are suggested. The American Society of Plastic Surgery (ASPS) states, "CD30 is the main diagnostic test that must be performed on the seroma fluid as routine pathology or H&E staining can frequently miss the diagnosis." [71] Diagnosis and treatment of breast implant associated ALCL now follows standardized guidelines established by the National Comprehensive Cancer Network.[72]
Breast reduction involves reducing the size of the breast. A breast lift involves lifting the nipple-areolar complex and reducing the excess skin of the breast. Breast reductions can involve just liposuction in patients who have more fatty tissue than glandular breast tissue. Liposuction alone indeed does reduce the volume of the breasts. However, sagging of the breast can result and liposuction alone is therefore performed usually in highly selected patients.

One of the main factors that influences how much breast implants cost is whether you choose silicone or saline breast implants. Saline implants cost between $800 and $1,000. Silicone cost between $1,800 and $2,000. On average, silicone implants cost up to $1,000 more than saline implants. While the prices of implants are set by the implant manufacturer, you can always expect that your procedure will cost more if you choose silicone over saline. Newer implant designs, such as IDEAL® implants, also tend to cost more. IDEAL implants, in particular, cost more because they are designed with a special shell that prevents silent rupture. Implant surgery costs by type

Unfortunately, as time goes on it is often difficult for patients to remember the specifics of the type of breast augmentation surgery and implants that they had.  Your are not alone!  The easiest way to determine what type of implant you had is to request a copy of the operative report from either the hospital, surgery center or your surgeon's office.  The implant specifics are recorded on this document.  Your office record also includes this information.  If it has been over ten years since your procedure, sometimes these records are no longer available.  Ultrasound or MRI can help to answer this question but it is an expensive way to solve the mystery and not an indication for these procedures.  If you registered your implants with the manufacturer at the time of surgery, the company will have a record of this information.  Fortunately, this inforation is not absoltely critical to your health unless you are having a problem with your implants.  Your surgeon can often develop a reasonable treatment plan even without this information.  I would strongly recommend that you register your implants and purchase the affordable insurance program if you have surgery again.  These programs are helpful in storing vital information regarding your implant type, size, filler, model and lot number.  Should there be a recall or long term problem requiring additional surgery, this information is readily available.  There is often also some fiancial support to offset costs.  Investigate the options available by contacting your surgeon or the implant manufacturer's websites.

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration established the age ranges for women seeking breast implants; for breast reconstruction, silicone-gel filled implants and saline-filled implants were approved for women of all ages; for breast augmentation, saline implants were approved for women 18 years of age and older; silicone implants were approved for women 22 years of age and older.[120] Because each breast implant device entails different medical risks, the minimum age of the patient for saline breast implants is different from the minimum age of the patient for silicone breast implants—because of the filler leakage and silent shell-rupture risks; thus, periodic MRI screening examinations are the recommended post-operative, follow-up therapy for the patient.[121] In other countries, in Europe and Oceania, the national health ministries' breast implant policies do not endorse periodic MRI screening of asymptomatic patients, but suggest palpation proper—with or without an ultrasonic screening—to be sufficient post-operative therapy for most patients.
We strongly recommend you choose an implant type with your surgeon, who will be able to match the right type to accomplish your desired results. All available implants are considered good, safe choices. However, this article will explain the pros and cons of each of the three main types of breast implants so you can get an idea of what might be the best fit for you. 

the second technological development was a polyurethane foam coating for the shell of the breast implant; the coating reduced the incidence of capsular contracture, by causing an inflammatory reaction that impeded the formation of a capsule of fibrous collagen tissue around the breast implant. Nevertheless, despite that prophylactic measure, the medical use of polyurethane-coated breast implants was briefly discontinued, because of the potential health-risk posed by 2,4-toluenediamine (TDA), a carcinogenic by-product of the chemical breakdown of the polyurethane foam coating of the breast implant.[92]
There are two types of breast implants approved by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA): silicone-filled and saline-filled. They come in various sizes and shapes, and with two types of shells: textured shells and smooth shells. A type of silicone-filled implant with a thicker filling, called a form-stable highly cohesive implant, or "gummy bear" breast implant, is currently under investigation and may one day provide another option for women undergoing breast augmentation with implants.

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration established the age ranges for women seeking breast implants; for breast reconstruction, silicone-gel filled implants and saline-filled implants were approved for women of all ages; for breast augmentation, saline implants were approved for women 18 years of age and older; silicone implants were approved for women 22 years of age and older.[120] Because each breast implant device entails different medical risks, the minimum age of the patient for saline breast implants is different from the minimum age of the patient for silicone breast implants—because of the filler leakage and silent shell-rupture risks; thus, periodic MRI screening examinations are the recommended post-operative, follow-up therapy for the patient.[121] In other countries, in Europe and Oceania, the national health ministries' breast implant policies do not endorse periodic MRI screening of asymptomatic patients, but suggest palpation proper—with or without an ultrasonic screening—to be sufficient post-operative therapy for most patients.

With each day that passed, I felt a bit better. My surgery was on a Monday, and by Thursday I was well enough to do some work from home, like answering emails. On Friday night, I went to see a movie, and it felt so great to be out. (At that point, the swelling had dropped to my jaw, the bruises had faded, and I looked fairly sane, save for the splint.) I spent most of the weekend running errands, working, and enjoying spring in Central Park. It was a little weird to be out in the splint, but not bad enough to keep me cooped up in my apartment. And I think being active helped me rebound faster.
“I’ve found that sometimes MRIs are not actually very reliable. In some instances, a patient’s MRI said the silicone gel implant had ruptured, and then when I went in to operate on it, it actually hadn’t. I’ve had one or two patients where an MRI showed the implant wasn’t ruptured, but based on my clinical exam I really thought there was a concern, so I went in and it turned out it was ruptured.”
The FDA has identified that breast implants may be associated with a rare form of cancer called anaplastic large-cell lymphoma, believed to be associated with chronic bacterial inflammation.[69] Similar ALCL phenomena have been seen with other types of medical implants including vascular access ports, orthopedic hip implants, and jaw (TMJ) implants. As of February 1, 2017, the FDA has received a total of 359 medical device reports of breast-implant-associated ALCL (BIALCL), including 9 deaths.[70] Most cases of breast implant-associated ALCL had implants in for many years prior to the condition, and are usually treated successfully by simple removal of the implant and the capsule surrounding the implant without the need for chemotherapy if no evidence of systemic disease exists. If women with implants present with delayed swelling or fluid collection, cytologic studies and test for a marker "CD30" are suggested. The American Society of Plastic Surgery (ASPS) states, "CD30 is the main diagnostic test that must be performed on the seroma fluid as routine pathology or H&E staining can frequently miss the diagnosis." [71] Diagnosis and treatment of breast implant associated ALCL now follows standardized guidelines established by the National Comprehensive Cancer Network.[72]
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