4. Last but not least, your preference matters a lot!  Before surgery, I ask my patients to bring photos of buttock shapes that they like.  This helps me understand how much of a buttock size increase and shape each patient desires.  Some patients like a more curvy, rounded shape with wide hips (hour-glass figure) while others prefer a more projected or athletic shape.  Your preference of buttock outcome is a very important factor in the decision of how much fat is transferred, so I spend a lot of time with each patient before surgery to understand your goals and express what I think can be achieved.  Good communication between patient and surgeon is very important to achieving optimal surgical outcomes.

When a silicone breast implant ruptures it usually does not deflate, yet the filler gel does leak from it, which can migrate to the implant pocket; therefore, an intracapsular rupture (in-capsule leak) can become an extracapsular rupture (out-of-capsule leak), and each occurrence is resolved by explantation. Although the leaked silicone filler-gel can migrate from the chest tissues to elsewhere in the woman's body, most clinical complications are limited to the breast and armpit areas, usually manifested as granulomas (inflammatory nodules) and axillary lymphadenopathy (enlarged lymph glands in the armpit area).[41][42][43]

In the past, concerns emerged that silicone implants posed health risks, including an increased risk of systemic diseases such as lupus and arthritis. The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) placed a moratorium on silicone implants in 1992 so the safety of these devices could be studied. However, in 2006 the agency concluded that there was no evidence of risk and lifted the moratorium.

In 1997, the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) appointed the Institute of Medicine (IOM) of the U.S. National Academy of Sciences (NAS) to investigate the potential risks of operative and post-operative complications from the emplacement of silicone breast implants. The IOM's review of the safety and efficacy of silicone gel-filled breast implants, reported that the "evidence suggests diseases or conditions, such as connective tissue diseases, cancer, neurological diseases, or other systemic complaints or conditions are no more common in women with breast implants, than in women without implants" subsequent studies and systemic review found no causal link between silicone breast implants and disease.[113]
The current lifetime risk of BIA-ALCL in the U.S. is unknown, but estimates have ranged between estimated to be between 1 in 70,000 to 1 in 500,000 women with breast implants according to MD Anderson.[73] Certain geographic locations have demonstrated variable risks. For instance, a December 2016 update from the Therapeutic Goods Administration of Australia and New Zealand reported a risk of 1:1,000 to 1:10,000 for textured implants.".[71] To date (2017), there has not been a case of BIAL reported where the patient had only implantation of smooth shell breast implants or a textured tissue expander that was exchanged for a smooth implant. The paucity of cases reported in Asian populations has raised the possibility that there may be a range of genetic susceptibility to the phenomena, or alternatively merely reflect differences in how cases are identified and reported.
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