Your surgeon can take photos of your breasts and detail your physical symptoms caused by enlarged breasts in a letter. Get in touch with your health insurer early and make sure you understand exactly what they will pay for. For example, will insurance cover such things as lab costs or anesthesiologist fees? Asking in advance will help prevent surprise costs after the surgery.

Case 94: This patient was seeing the early signs of facial aging including loss of skin tone and elasticity, early jowling, and heaviness under the chin. A lower facelift along with fat transfer to the under eye and cheek area substantially improved the contour and even apparent texture of her skin, making her look noticeably younger. In addition, the overall effect was completed with a rhinoplasty focused on reducing the width, rounding, and thickness of her tip and nostrils which is a challenge in the setting of thick skin.

The amount of good quality, transferrable fat will depend on how much can be retrieved from the donor sites. This can be partially estimated after examination (the surgeon inspects and pinches the areas of potential fat harvest to get an idea of how much fat can realistically be harvested), but it is hard to know for sure until the procedure is well underway. Abdominal and love handle/flank fat tend to be the best sources because the fat is more easily retrieved and softer than back fat, but the back is also routinely liposuctioned in the BBL procedure to both obtain extra tissue for transfer and to improve the 360 degree shaping of the torso. I have transferred anywhere from 300cc per buttock to over 1200 in some patients, depending on the circumstances.
The Cronin–Gerow Implant, prosthesis model 1963, was a silicone rubber envelope-sac, shaped like a teardrop, which was filled with viscous silicone-gel. To reduce the rotation of the emplaced breast implant upon the chest wall, the model 1963 prosthesis was affixed to the implant pocket with a fastener-patch, made of Dacron material (Polyethylene terephthalate), which was attached to the rear of the breast implant shell.[91]
Transaxillary: an incision made to the axilla (armpit), from which the dissection tunnels medially, to emplace the implants, either bluntly or with an endoscope (illuminated video microcamera), without producing visible scars on the breast proper; yet, it is likelier to produce inferior asymmetry of the implant-device position. Therefore, surgical revision of transaxillary emplaced breast implants usually requires either an IMF incision or a periareolar incision.
Manufacturer’s warranty programs can mitigate some of the costs of treating complications. But, the warranty payment is only available if a rupture is detected. Some surgeons fail to inform their patients of the need for periodic MRIs, or downplay the FDA recommendation in order to make a sale. “Many women don’t know about the maintenance costs and potential expenses of silicone gel implants,” reports Dr. Ellen Mahony, board-certified plastic surgeon in Westport, CT.  “Because rupture with a silicone gel implant is ‘silent,’ it can go undetected for an extended period, often not becoming obvious until the process of capsular contraction has begun.” Capsular contraction leads to a more complex surgery. That means added surgical costs which your warranty may not cover.
Unfortunately, as time goes on it is often difficult for patients to remember the specifics of the type of breast augmentation surgery and implants that they had.  Your are not alone!  The easiest way to determine what type of implant you had is to request a copy of the operative report from either the hospital, surgery center or your surgeon's office.  The implant specifics are recorded on this document.  Your office record also includes this information.  If it has been over ten years since your procedure, sometimes these records are no longer available.  Ultrasound or MRI can help to answer this question but it is an expensive way to solve the mystery and not an indication for these procedures.  If you registered your implants with the manufacturer at the time of surgery, the company will have a record of this information.  Fortunately, this inforation is not absoltely critical to your health unless you are having a problem with your implants.  Your surgeon can often develop a reasonable treatment plan even without this information.  I would strongly recommend that you register your implants and purchase the affordable insurance program if you have surgery again.  These programs are helpful in storing vital information regarding your implant type, size, filler, model and lot number.  Should there be a recall or long term problem requiring additional surgery, this information is readily available.  There is often also some fiancial support to offset costs.  Investigate the options available by contacting your surgeon or the implant manufacturer's websites.

Case 72: This patient had sustained a nasal fracture that caused a significant deviation of her nose. The fracture was corrected along with a septoplasty to improve breathing. Loss of tip support after the injury made her hump look more prominent and her tip felt more droopy. The bump was smoothened and her tip angulation restored to create the softer, more feminine profile she wanted. At the same time, fat transfer to the cheek and under eye area and subtle neck liposuction substantially improved the flat cheek and mid-face contour that previously made her feel hollowed and tired looking without makeup.
By the next day, I was looking more like a monster and didn't want to see anyone. The bruises around my eyes shined a bright greenish-purple, and I was swollen all over with some intense pressure in my head. I couldn't breathe through my nose anymore, because of all the blood and swelling. I felt congested and uncomfortable, almost like I had a bad cold, but again, nothing Tylenol couldn't handle. But I fully expected this, as Dr. Kolker said it could take two weeks for everything to run its course.
After reviewing the medical data, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration concluded that TDA-induced breast cancer was an infinitesimal health-risk to women with breast implants, and did not justify legally requiring physicians to explain the matter to their patients. In the event, polyurethane-coated breast implants remain in plastic surgery practice in Europe and in South America; and no manufacturer has sought FDA approval for medical sales of such breast implants in the U.S.[93]
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