Firstly about surgical technique. Breast lift and reduction employ similar surgical technique, it's just that with reduction you're removing more breast tissue (because the biggest aim of a reduction is.... to reduce the size of the breast). Does breast lift remove SOME breast tissue, the answer is yes, but the AIM of the lift is more to restore the youthfulness of the breast. Both women, one wanting a reduction vs a lift need their nipple/areolar complex repositioned "up". Only the woman wanting a reduction need the volume addressed.
The woman wanting a lift is usually slightly different. She had breasts she was happy with before, she had loving kids who she may or may not have breastfed, exercised and had a good life. They come wanting to restore the youthful breast they once they had(or better), they hate that it is slightly more deflated than before and it's slightly more south then they'd like. The formal name of this operation is "Mastopexy" and that's why you hear terms like "Mastopexy augmentation" because often in order to restore the youthfulness of the breast you not only need to reposition the nipple/areolar complex "up" with a mastopexy, you also need to provide some additional volume with an implant, hence augmentation as well. The discussion with implant also is entirely different discussion all together, but this highlights the primary difference in the reduction and a lift.
I have had much experience in fat grafting to the buttocks for Brazillian Buttock Augmentation in Los Angeles. I have had patients from 105 lbs to more than 200 lbs. the best results were in those that had much fat available for harvesting. In my experience depending on the technique of harvesting, processing, and injecting the fat, at least 90% of the volume can stay. I have had several patients who have retained more than 90% of their buttock volume despite having had pregnacies, working out, and after more than 5 years.
Transumbilical: a trans-umbilical breast augmentation (TUBA) is a less common implant-device emplacement technique wherein the incision is at the umbilicus (navel), and the dissection tunnels superiorly, up towards the bust. The TUBA approach allows emplacing the breast implants without producing visible scars upon the breast proper; but makes appropriate dissection and device-emplacement more technically difficult. A TUBA procedure is performed bluntly—without the endoscope's visual assistance—and is not appropriate for emplacing (pre-filled) silicone-gel implants, because of the great potential for damaging the elastomer silicone shell of the breast implant during its manual insertion through the short (~2.0 cm) incision at the navel, and because pre-filled silicone gel implants are incompressible, and cannot be inserted through so small an incision.[75]
Case 71: Tip and nostril width and overall nasal projection made the nose feel dominant for this young woman. Rhinoplasty involved making her whole nose smaller by deprojecting, refining the tip, and removing some nostril flare. At the same time, a nasal fracture and breathing concerns were addressed. Neck Liposuction also helped to define and re-balance her jawline to create the improved facial proportions that she desired.
Manufacturer’s warranty programs can mitigate some of the costs of treating complications. But, the warranty payment is only available if a rupture is detected. Some surgeons fail to inform their patients of the need for periodic MRIs, or downplay the FDA recommendation in order to make a sale. “Many women don’t know about the maintenance costs and potential expenses of silicone gel implants,” reports Dr. Ellen Mahony, board-certified plastic surgeon in Westport, CT.  “Because rupture with a silicone gel implant is ‘silent,’ it can go undetected for an extended period, often not becoming obvious until the process of capsular contraction has begun.” Capsular contraction leads to a more complex surgery. That means added surgical costs which your warranty may not cover.
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