By and large, there is no 'perfect type' of breast implant. What looked stunning on one of your best friends doesn't necessarily mean that the same implant will be the best choice for you. This is why we recommend face-to-face consultations; an honest discussion with an experienced, knowledgeable plastic surgeon about your desired enhancement is a must. And you'll want to consider your surgeon's opinion and recommendations based on your existing body type and physical assessment.
A breast reduction typically includes a lift.  However, a lift does not necessarily require a reduction.  Both operations have similar incision patterns and resultant scars, but they have different indications.  One of the first questions I ask a patient who desires an improved appearance of her breasts is if she would like to be the same size, smaller, or larger.  The patient who wants to be the same size and is happy with her breasts when wearing a bra but unhappy with the amount of sagging without a bra is a candidate for a breast lift alone.  The patient who desires to be smaller or has one breast noticeably larger than the other, is a candidate for a breast reduction-lift combination.  Sometimes patients feel their breasts look smaller after removal of the excess skin with the lift even though no breast tissue was removed; the reason for this is that some of what fills your bra cup is excess skin.  The patient with sagging who desires to have larger breasts is a candidate for a breast lift with implants.

The FDA has identified that breast implants may be associated with a rare form of cancer called anaplastic large-cell lymphoma, believed to be associated with chronic bacterial inflammation.[69] Similar ALCL phenomena have been seen with other types of medical implants including vascular access ports, orthopedic hip implants, and jaw (TMJ) implants. As of February 1, 2017, the FDA has received a total of 359 medical device reports of breast-implant-associated ALCL (BIALCL), including 9 deaths.[70] Most cases of breast implant-associated ALCL had implants in for many years prior to the condition, and are usually treated successfully by simple removal of the implant and the capsule surrounding the implant without the need for chemotherapy if no evidence of systemic disease exists. If women with implants present with delayed swelling or fluid collection, cytologic studies and test for a marker "CD30" are suggested. The American Society of Plastic Surgery (ASPS) states, "CD30 is the main diagnostic test that must be performed on the seroma fluid as routine pathology or H&E staining can frequently miss the diagnosis." [71] Diagnosis and treatment of breast implant associated ALCL now follows standardized guidelines established by the National Comprehensive Cancer Network.[72]
×