Unfortunately, as time goes on it is often difficult for patients to remember the specifics of the type of breast augmentation surgery and implants that they had.  Your are not alone!  The easiest way to determine what type of implant you had is to request a copy of the operative report from either the hospital, surgery center or your surgeon's office.  The implant specifics are recorded on this document.  Your office record also includes this information.  If it has been over ten years since your procedure, sometimes these records are no longer available.  Ultrasound or MRI can help to answer this question but it is an expensive way to solve the mystery and not an indication for these procedures.  If you registered your implants with the manufacturer at the time of surgery, the company will have a record of this information.  Fortunately, this inforation is not absoltely critical to your health unless you are having a problem with your implants.  Your surgeon can often develop a reasonable treatment plan even without this information.  I would strongly recommend that you register your implants and purchase the affordable insurance program if you have surgery again.  These programs are helpful in storing vital information regarding your implant type, size, filler, model and lot number.  Should there be a recall or long term problem requiring additional surgery, this information is readily available.  There is often also some fiancial support to offset costs.  Investigate the options available by contacting your surgeon or the implant manufacturer's websites.
Many women are tempted to brush aside the idea of complications when asking how much do breast implants cost, thinking it won’t happen to them. Knowing your statistical risk of complications will help you plan ahead and pick an implant that is more likely to keep you out of complex surgery in the future. For primary augmentations, silicone gel implants have a higher complication rate for both capsular contracture (10.9-16.2% at 7-8 years) and implant rupture (7.2-13.6% at 8 years), than the IDEAL IMPLANT. “The silicone gel from a ruptured implant can stick to the tissues on the chest wall and a capsulectomy is often required,” explains Dr. Mahony. “The warranty may not fully cover these costs. In contrast [for primary augmentations] structured breast implants have a capsular contracture risk of only 6.6% and a rupture risk of only 2.1% at seven years, with revision surgery generally being less invasive.” Dr. Larry Nichter, board-certified plastic surgeon in Newport Beach, California, tells us about the likelihood of subsequent surgeries with IDEAL IMPLANT saying, “It’s incredibly safe and so there’s far fewer lifetime surgeries with an IDEAL IMPLANT Structured Breast Implant, compared to silicone gel implants.”

The Summary of Safety and Effectiveness for each of the FDA-approved saline- and silicone gel filled breast implants details safety information known at the time of FDA approval. As the FDA learns of new safety information, it requires companies to update their product labeling. The most current safety information about saline- and silicone gel-filled breast implants can be found in the labeling.
Of course, the breast reduction vs. breast lift question is not really cut and dry because every woman is unique. You may be unsure of what volume you would like with the breasts in a more favorable position. Breasts may be different sizes (asymmetric). The position of the nipple may be out of proportion to the amount of breast sag. Breasts may be ‘deflated’ after pregnancy. You may have heard that breast implants are the only reliable way to lift breasts. These questions can easily be addressed at the time of your consult.
Potential candidates should also have adequate fat reserves for transfer. This becomes especially important when one considers the anticipated rate of fat resorption and graft loss. I typically recommened patients aim for at least 500 cc transferred per cheek. This would amount to 1 liter of fat (not lipoaspirate) after processing. Candidates with inadequate fat reserves are likely to be disappointed with their ultimate volume once healing is complete. 
The first step in the breast implant surgery process is a consultation with a board-certified plastic surgeon who has extensive experience performing various types of breast surgery. During this meeting, the surgeon will perform an examination of your breast tissue, discuss your goals for surgery and tell you what you need to know about breast implants. Based on his or her examination, the surgeon will determine whether you are a candidate for surgery.
The first step in the breast implant surgery process is a consultation with a board-certified plastic surgeon who has extensive experience performing various types of breast surgery. During this meeting, the surgeon will perform an examination of your breast tissue, discuss your goals for surgery and tell you what you need to know about breast implants. Based on his or her examination, the surgeon will determine whether you are a candidate for surgery.
The human body's immune response to a surgically installed foreign object—breast implant, cardiac pacemaker, orthopedic prosthesis—is to encapsulate it with scar tissue capsules of tightly woven collagen fibers, in order to maintain the integrity of the body by isolating the foreign object, and so tolerate its presence. Capsular contracture—which should be distinguished from normal capsular tissue—occurs when the collagen-fiber capsule thickens and compresses the breast implant; it is a painful complication that might distort either the breast implant, or the breast, or both.

Subglandular: the breast implant is emplaced to the retromammary space, between the breast tissue (the mammary gland) and the pectoralis major muscle (major muscle of the chest), which most approximates the plane of normal breast tissue, and affords the most aesthetic results. Yet, in women with thin pectoral soft-tissue, the subglandular position is likelier to show the ripples and wrinkles of the underlying implant. Moreover, the capsular contracture incidence rate is slightly greater with subglandular implantation.

The Cronin–Gerow Implant, prosthesis model 1963, was a silicone rubber envelope-sac, shaped like a teardrop, which was filled with viscous silicone-gel. To reduce the rotation of the emplaced breast implant upon the chest wall, the model 1963 prosthesis was affixed to the implant pocket with a fastener-patch, made of Dacron material (Polyethylene terephthalate), which was attached to the rear of the breast implant shell.[91]

Before I left his office, Dr. Kolker took me through some before-and-after shots of some of his rhinoplasty patients. Many of them had noses similar to mine, and their "after" pictures were much like the ones Dr. Kolker had generated for me. He told me that of all the nose jobs he'd done in his career, only one time did he have to go back and operate again, and that was because the patient wanted a more drastic change. That clinched it for me: I knew I was in good hands and that my result would be subtle and not overly "done."
In 1998, the U.S. FDA approved adjunct study protocols for silicone-gel filled implants only for breast reconstruction patients and for revision-surgery patients; and also approved the Dow Corning Corporation's Investigational Device Exemption (IDE) study for silicone-gel breast implants for a limited number of breast augmentation-, reconstruction-, and revision-surgery patients.[113]
I had wrongly assumed he could simply flatten the hump and be done, but he explained that you can't sculpt one area without considering how it'll impact everything else. If he smoothed the bridge and did nothing else, my nose could wind up looking far too wide from the front. So ultimately, he would need to break my nose and seamlessly draw it in closer to create the precise size and shape I was after. He'd also have to reduce the cartilage at the tip and turn it up slightly, from 91 to 93 degrees. In the end, my nose would be smaller, with a straighter bridge, a refined tip, and more clearly defined nostrils.
Case 71: Tip and nostril width and overall nasal projection made the nose feel dominant for this young woman. Rhinoplasty involved making her whole nose smaller by deprojecting, refining the tip, and removing some nostril flare. At the same time, a nasal fracture and breathing concerns were addressed. Neck Liposuction also helped to define and re-balance her jawline to create the improved facial proportions that she desired.
Structured implants were approved by the FDA and Health Canada in 2014 as a third form of breast implant.[97] Structured implants incorporate both saline and silicone gel implant technology. The filler is only saline solution in case of rupture and has a natural feel like silicone gel implants.[98] The implant uses an internal structure which consists of a series of nested shells that support the upper pole with the two lumen being filled with only saline. The implant is inserted empty and then filled once in place which requires less of an incision than pre-filled implants.[97] If one of the lumen of the structured implant ruptures, it leaks and empties. The other lumen remain intact and the implant only partially deflates, allowing for ease of explant and replacement.[97]
The FDA has identified that breast implants may be associated with a rare form of cancer called anaplastic large-cell lymphoma, believed to be associated with chronic bacterial inflammation.[69] Similar ALCL phenomena have been seen with other types of medical implants including vascular access ports, orthopedic hip implants, and jaw (TMJ) implants. As of February 1, 2017, the FDA has received a total of 359 medical device reports of breast-implant-associated ALCL (BIALCL), including 9 deaths.[70] Most cases of breast implant-associated ALCL had implants in for many years prior to the condition, and are usually treated successfully by simple removal of the implant and the capsule surrounding the implant without the need for chemotherapy if no evidence of systemic disease exists. If women with implants present with delayed swelling or fluid collection, cytologic studies and test for a marker "CD30" are suggested. The American Society of Plastic Surgery (ASPS) states, "CD30 is the main diagnostic test that must be performed on the seroma fluid as routine pathology or H&E staining can frequently miss the diagnosis." [71] Diagnosis and treatment of breast implant associated ALCL now follows standardized guidelines established by the National Comprehensive Cancer Network.[72]
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