Case 69: This patient was bothered by his prominent ears and a sense of width to his nose that made it feel bulky and unrefined in his view. While still preserving his ethnic identity, he was able to achieve a meaningful improvement in nasal balance. Bringing his ears back into the vertical plane helped to make them less noticeable and remove them as a source of focus for him.

This photo gallery represents a cross-section of my rhinoplasty practice and includes patients of different age, gender, nasal shape, and ethnic background. This gallery is not a collection of my best rhinoplasty outcomes, but rather a representative sampling of my typical cosmetic result. In addition, a majority of these patients also had simultaneous correction of severe nasal breathing difficulties, which cannot be appreciated in photographs.
Implants come in various sizes, and your surgeon will guide you on choosing the right size to help you achieve the look you desire. In addition, your surgeon will help you decide whether you want a more natural, teardrop shape or a more rounded look. Implants also come with either smooth our textured shell surfaces, and your surgeon will help you decide which is best for you.
Case 34: Hispanic Rhinoplasty in this patient meant removal of a high dorsal bump on profile and correction of a droopy-appearing tip. On front view, there is correction of a left nasal bone fracture and refinement of the nasal tip. All of this was done while still maintaining her unique individuality and while bearing in mind the various challenges Rhinoplasty in Latino patients present- thicker skin and softer cartilage.

Dr. Cohen specializes in breast lifts, augmentations, revisions and reductions as well as breast cancer reconstructions. A long time dream of Dr. Cohen’s was to travel to developing countries and provide expert surgical care to those who have no other possible access to medical care. This became a reality in 2007 when she became a founding member and Vice President of ISMS Operation Kids.
Dr. Rotemberg will examine the area of your body you would like to improve upon for muscle strength, skin elasticity, and fat loss, as well as the area in which she believes the fat should be transferred from. At this time, she will also ask you pertinent medical questions, and do a full exam, to make sure you are a good candidate for any procedure.
Case 34: Hispanic Rhinoplasty in this patient meant removal of a high dorsal bump on profile and correction of a droopy-appearing tip. On front view, there is correction of a left nasal bone fracture and refinement of the nasal tip. All of this was done while still maintaining her unique individuality and while bearing in mind the various challenges Rhinoplasty in Latino patients present- thicker skin and softer cartilage.
During your initial consultation, you will have the opportunity to discuss what you want to achieve. Your surgeon will evaluate you as a candidate for fat grafting and clarify what fat grafting can do for you. Once the surgeon understands your goals, he or she may suggest additional or related procedures. It is important to be completely honest during the consultation. Bring several photos of yourself at an earlier age; they may serve as a good point of reference for discussing your goals. It’s a good idea to be fully prepared to answer these questions:
If you have considerable sagging, pendulous breasts, an anchor lift, which allows a cosmetic surgeon to remove a significant amount of excess skin and sagging tissues, may yield the best results. This technique involves 3 incisions: one around the edge of the areola, one vertically from the bottom of the areola to the breast crease, and one along the inframammary fold, hidden in the breast crease. Your cosmetic surgeon may also use this technique if you are having a breast reduction with lift. While the anchor lift comes with some visible scarring, these typically will fade significantly with proper care, and are easily hidden by a bikini top.
Unfortunately, as time goes on it is often difficult for patients to remember the specifics of the type of breast augmentation surgery and implants that they had.  Your are not alone!  The easiest way to determine what type of implant you had is to request a copy of the operative report from either the hospital, surgery center or your surgeon's office.  The implant specifics are recorded on this document.  Your office record also includes this information.  If it has been over ten years since your procedure, sometimes these records are no longer available.  Ultrasound or MRI can help to answer this question but it is an expensive way to solve the mystery and not an indication for these procedures.  If you registered your implants with the manufacturer at the time of surgery, the company will have a record of this information.  Fortunately, this inforation is not absoltely critical to your health unless you are having a problem with your implants.  Your surgeon can often develop a reasonable treatment plan even without this information.  I would strongly recommend that you register your implants and purchase the affordable insurance program if you have surgery again.  These programs are helpful in storing vital information regarding your implant type, size, filler, model and lot number.  Should there be a recall or long term problem requiring additional surgery, this information is readily available.  There is often also some fiancial support to offset costs.  Investigate the options available by contacting your surgeon or the implant manufacturer's websites.

Case 96: To see how well our results last, see these photos of our patient 8 years after rhinoplasty and facial fat transfer! Her rhinoplasty involved softening her look and removing the convexity on the bridge that made her tip look downturned. Fat transfer under the eyes has stood the test of time and really helped to reduce her under eye hollows to noticeably brighten her appearance.
A breast implant is a prosthesis used to change the size, shape, and contour of a person's breast. In reconstructive plastic surgery, breast implants can be placed to restore a natural looking breast mound for post–mastectomy breast reconstruction patients or to correct congenital defects and deformities of the chest wall. They are also used cosmetically to enhance or enlarge the appearance of the breast through breast augmentation surgery.

Both breast reduction and breast lift surgeries are similar in that they both serve to reshape the breasts. Breast lift, through any of the various techniques, basically serves to reposition the breast and nipple on the chest to reverse the effects of time and gravity. The same changes that are noted in ptotic, or sagging, breasts are often seen in large breasts that require reduction: the nipple position is often low and there is excess skin (in addition to the excess breast tissue). The breast reduction then combines a lift with removal of extra tissue to create a breast that has a higher nipple position, reduced extra skin, and smaller and more balanced breast size.
Unfortunately, as time goes on it is often difficult for patients to remember the specifics of the type of breast augmentation surgery and implants that they had.  Your are not alone!  The easiest way to determine what type of implant you had is to request a copy of the operative report from either the hospital, surgery center or your surgeon's office.  The implant specifics are recorded on this document.  Your office record also includes this information.  If it has been over ten years since your procedure, sometimes these records are no longer available.  Ultrasound or MRI can help to answer this question but it is an expensive way to solve the mystery and not an indication for these procedures.  If you registered your implants with the manufacturer at the time of surgery, the company will have a record of this information.  Fortunately, this inforation is not absoltely critical to your health unless you are having a problem with your implants.  Your surgeon can often develop a reasonable treatment plan even without this information.  I would strongly recommend that you register your implants and purchase the affordable insurance program if you have surgery again.  These programs are helpful in storing vital information regarding your implant type, size, filler, model and lot number.  Should there be a recall or long term problem requiring additional surgery, this information is readily available.  There is often also some fiancial support to offset costs.  Investigate the options available by contacting your surgeon or the implant manufacturer's websites. 

Dr. Rotemberg will examine the area of your body you would like to improve upon for muscle strength, skin elasticity, and fat loss, as well as the area in which she believes the fat should be transferred from. At this time, she will also ask you pertinent medical questions, and do a full exam, to make sure you are a good candidate for any procedure.

If you’re researching “how much do breast implants cost,” chances are you are imagining all the benefits they offer. Breast augmentation is the top cosmetic plastic surgery procedure performed in the United States for a reason. Breast augmentations have a high rate of patient satisfaction according to research. In a study published in the May 2013 issue of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery, researchers gathered information from 225 women after their breast augmentations. The study revealed that 91.1% of women felt improved self-esteem, 64.3% had an improved quality of life, and 98.7% would repeat the surgery. But there is another side to breast implants, one you should know about before scheduling your plastic surgery consultation. While the initial costs and satisfaction rates are similar between implant types, the long-term maintenance costs and emotional toll differs in important ways. Silicone gel breast implants carry a high rate of certain complications and an increased anxiety when compared to the newest breast implant on the market, IDEAL IMPLANT® Structured Breast Implants.
The saline breast implant—filled with saline solution (biological-concentration salt water 0.90% w/v of NaCl, ca. 300 mOsm/L.)—was first manufactured by the Laboratoires Arion company, in France, and was introduced for use as a prosthetic medical device in 1964. The contemporary models of saline breast implant are manufactured with thicker, room-temperature vulcanized (RTV) shells made of a silicone elastomer. The study In vitro Deflation of Pre-filled Saline Breast Implants (2006) reported that the rates of deflation (filler leakage) of the pre-filled saline breast implant made it a second-choice prosthesis for corrective breast surgery.[88] Nonetheless, in the 1990s, the saline breast implant was the prosthesis most common device used for breast augmentation surgery in the United States, because of the U.S. FDA's restriction against the implantation of silicone-filled breast implants outside of clinical studies. Saline breast implants have enjoyed little popularity in the rest of the world, possessing negligible market share.
I love so many of my features. For instance, the green eyes I got from my mom, my naturally full lips, and smile, but my nose has been a source of insecurity. Around 15, as puberty hit, my nose just...changed. One day, it suddenly looked large and awkward, with a pronounced bump and protruding tip that I simply didn't identify with. I'd catch my profile in the mirror and be uncomfortable with the face staring back.
When talking about the price with your plastic surgeon, it’s important to know exactly what the cost covers. Is it just the surgeon’s fee? Or will it cover anesthesia, facility fees, implant cost, medical tests, pre- or post-op appointments, and medical supplies you’ll need during recovery? Do you need to purchase a specific bra for recovery or will they provide one?
When you decide to have breast augmentation surgery, part of the preparation will involve discussing the cost with your surgeon. You'll receive an itemized list of the costs associated with your surgery, and you'll have a chance to ask questions if you have them. Your breast augmentation cost can be broken down to include the following fees and items:
This includes the cost of the implants, which ranges from $1,000 to $1,300 as well as a facility fee of $800 to $1,200, an anesthesia fee of $600 to $800 and the surgeon's fee that averages $4,005 for silicone-gel filled implants and $3,583 for saline implants. Patients in the western United States can expect to pay the highest average surgeon's fee of about $3,949, while patients in the south central part of the country generally pay lower fees with an average of $2,739.
From your description, you seem to be a very good candidate for this new technique and should really get the look that you are desiring without implants or any unnecessary visible scars. I would recommend that you search for an ABPS board certified plastic surgeon who is also a member of the American Society of Plastic Surgeons and the American Society of Aesthetic Plastic Surgeons in your area or an area that you would like to travel to on holiday who offers the Bellesoma technique to discuss your breast reduction and possible results.  You've provided great information - the only thing that would be more helpful in order to give you the best advice about your options would be an in-person exam.
Firstly about surgical technique. Breast lift and reduction employ similar surgical technique, it's just that with reduction you're removing more breast tissue (because the biggest aim of a reduction is.... to reduce the size of the breast). Does breast lift remove SOME breast tissue, the answer is yes, but the AIM of the lift is more to restore the youthfulness of the breast. Both women, one wanting a reduction vs a lift need their nipple/areolar complex repositioned "up". Only the woman wanting a reduction need the volume addressed.
https://idealimplant.com/wp-content/uploads/2018/11/20181029_how_much_do_breast_implants_cost_HERO.jpg 628 1200 Valerie Christensen https://idealimplant.com/wp-content/uploads/2019/01/Copy-of-II_Logo_Straight-Tag-Icon_4C-300x75.png Valerie Christensen2018-10-26 05:00:462019-03-31 01:39:35How Much Do Breast Implants Cost? The True Cost of Breast Implants

The cause of capsular contracture is unknown, but the common incidence factors include bacterial contamination, device-shell rupture, filler leakage, and hematoma. The surgical implantation procedures that have reduced the incidence of capsular contracture include submuscular emplacement, the use of breast implants with a textured surface (polyurethane-coated);[55][56][57] limited pre-operative handling of the implants, limited contact with the chest skin of the implant pocket before the emplacement of the breast implant, and irrigation of the recipient site with triple-antibiotic solutions.[58][59]


The plastic surgical emplacement of breast implant devices, either for breast reconstruction or for aesthetic purpose, presents the same health risks common to surgery, such as adverse reaction to anesthesia, hematoma (post-operative bleeding), late hematoma (post-operative bleeding after 6 months or more),[21] seroma (fluid accumulation), incision-site breakdown (wound infection). Complications specific to breast augmentation include breast pain, altered sensation, impeded breast-feeding function, visible wrinkling, asymmetry, thinning of the breast tissue, and symmastia, the “bread loafing” of the bust that interrupts the natural plane between the breasts. Specific treatments for the complications of indwelling breast implants—capsular contracture and capsular rupture—are periodic MRI monitoring and physical examinations. Furthermore, complications and re-operations related to the implantation surgery, and to tissue expanders (implant place-holders during surgery) can cause unfavorable scarring in approximately 6–7 per cent of the patients. [22][23][24] Statistically, 20 per cent of women who underwent cosmetic implantation, and 50 per cent of women who underwent breast reconstruction implantation, required their explantation at the 10-year mark.[25]
In 1999, the Institute of Medicine published the Safety of Silicone Breast Implants (1999) study that reported no evidence that saline-filled and silicone-gel filled breast implant devices caused systemic health problems; that their use posed no new health or safety risks; and that local complications are “the primary safety issue with silicone breast implants”, in distinguishing among routine and local medical complications and systemic health concerns.”[113][114][115]
By the next day, I was looking more like a monster and didn't want to see anyone. The bruises around my eyes shined a bright greenish-purple, and I was swollen all over with some intense pressure in my head. I couldn't breathe through my nose anymore, because of all the blood and swelling. I felt congested and uncomfortable, almost like I had a bad cold, but again, nothing Tylenol couldn't handle. But I fully expected this, as Dr. Kolker said it could take two weeks for everything to run its course.

Breast implants are not lifetime devices. The longer a woman has implants, the more likely it is that she will need to have surgery to remove or replace them. The most frequent complications and adverse outcomes experienced by breast implant patients include capsular contracture, reoperation, and implant removal (with or without replacement). Other common complications include implant rupture with deflation, wrinkling, asymmetry, scarring, pain, and infection. In addition, women with breast implants may have a very low but increased likelihood of being diagnosed with anaplastic large cell lymphoma (ALCL).
Case 25: This patient had what is called a tension nose wherein a convexity on the bridge pushes the tip forward and down. Notice how this also puts tension on the upper lip and appears to tether it from inside. a combination of straightening, improving breathing, removing the hump, and setting the tip appropriately also helps to relax the upper lip and complete the look.
There are four general types of breast implants, defined by their filler material: saline solution, silicone gel, structured and composite filler. The saline implant has an elastomer silicone shell filled with sterile saline solution during surgery; the silicone implant has an elastomer silicone shell pre-filled with viscous silicone gel; structured implants use nested elastomer silicone shells and two saline filled lumen; and the alternative composition implants featured miscellaneous fillers, such as soy oil, polypropylene string, etc. Composite implants are typically not recommended for use anymore and, in fact, their use is banned in the United States and Europe due to associated health risks and complications.
Your medical history. The most important question your doctor will ask you is about your motivation for surgery and your goals. Your doctor will also ask questions about your medical history — including a history of nasal obstruction, surgeries and any medications you take. If you have a bleeding disorder, such as hemophilia, you may not be a candidate for rhinoplasty.
Fill Filled with a highly cohesive gel for durable shape retention designed to give a youthful feel. Filled with a proprietary cohesive gel that hold together uniformly while retaining the natural give that resembles breast tissue. Filled with a saltwater solution similar to the fluid that makes up most of the human body; slightly firmer feel than gel.
While more experienced surgeons may charge more for their expertise, that’s not always the case. “You should not choose a qualified surgeon based on high fees any more than you should choose one based on low fees,” says Boca Raton, Florida plastic surgeon Dr. Hilton Becker in a RealSelf Q&A. “The most important factors should be education, experience, certification, and your ability to feel comfortable with your surgeon.”

2009 European Union International Committee for Quality Assurance, Medical Technologies & Devices in Plastic Surgery panel (IQUAM) The consensus statement of the Transatlantic Innovations conference (April 2009) indicated that additional medical studies demonstrated no association between silicone gel-filled breast implants and carcinoma, or any metabolic, immune, or allergic disorder.[38]
A woman wanting a reduction comes usually after having put up with the pain and in some cases embarrassment and hassle for years before she presents in front of surgeon. She experiences neck, back, shoulder pain, skin irritation and even infection, she feels self conscious and sick of breasts getting in the way of a normal life/shopping/exercising. 

As with any medical/surgical treatment, individual results may vary. Only a surgeon/physician can determine whether reconstruction or augmentation>is an appropriate course of treatment. The following are general adverse events associated with breast implant surgery: Device Rupture, Capsular contracture, Infection, Hematoma/Seroma, Pain, Reoperation, Implant removal, changes in Nipple and Breast Sensation, unsatisfactory results, breast-feeding complications. Other reported conditions are listed in the Product Insert Data Sheet (PIDS). See full list in the PIDS for the product information. These potential adverse events, including contraindications, warnings, and precautions need to be discussed with your doctor prior to surgery.
The surgical scars of a breast augmentation mammoplasty develop approximately at 6-weeks post-operative, and fade within months. Depending upon the daily-life physical activities required of the woman, the breast augmentation patient usually resumes her normal life at 1-week post-operative. Moreover, women whose breast implants were emplaced beneath the chest muscles (submuscular placement) usually have a longer, slightly more painful convalescence, because of the healing of the incisions to the chest muscles. Usually, she does not exercise or engage in strenuous physical activities for approximately 6 weeks. During the initial post-operative recovery, the woman is encouraged to regularly exercise (flex and move) her arm to alleviate pain and discomfort; if required, analgesic indwelling medication catheters can alleviate pain[80][81] Moreover, significantly improved patient recovery has resulted from refined breast-device implantation techniques (submuscular, subglandular) that allow 95 per cent of women to resume their normal lives at 24-hours post-procedure, without bandages, fluid drains, pain pumps, catheters, medical support brassières, or narcotic pain medication.[82][83][84][85]
The cost of compression garments varies. Women who choose smaller implants may find that a sports bra provides plenty of support. The most important thing is to follow your surgeon's recommendations to ensure your breasts get enough support while they heal. Some surgeons will put you in a garment after surgery at no cost and only charge for additional garments. You can learn about what your surgeon does at your consultation.
My consult with Dr. Kolker set me at ease. We started out talking casually about my nose — what I liked and disliked about it, any relevant medical concerns, that sort of thing. Then he did an evaluation to see if I'd be a candidate for rhinoplasty. He inspected the inside of my nose to check for a deviated septum (all clear). He examined the thickness of my skin, measured the width of my nose, and checked out the tip, all quick and painless.
If you’re hoping your breast implants will be covered by insurance because of something like asymmetry or changes after pregnancy, you probably need to explore other financing options. Breast implants are considered cosmetic surgery, so insurance companies typically won’t cover them. However, “Breast Implants are covered if they are being used as part of reconstruction after breast cancer or mastectomy,” says Houston plastic surgeon Dr. C. Bob Basu in a RealSelf Q&A.
Transaxillary: an incision made to the axilla (armpit), from which the dissection tunnels medially, to emplace the implants, either bluntly or with an endoscope (illuminated video microcamera), without producing visible scars on the breast proper; yet, it is likelier to produce inferior asymmetry of the implant-device position. Therefore, surgical revision of transaxillary emplaced breast implants usually requires either an IMF incision or a periareolar incision.
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