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Very slight changes to the structure of your nose — often measured in millimeters — can make a large difference in how your nose looks. Most of the time, an experienced surgeon can get results both of you are satisfied with. But in some cases, the slight changes aren't enough, and you and your surgeon might decide to do a second surgery for further changes. If this is the case, you must wait at least a year for the follow-up surgery, because your nose can go through changes during this time.
When a silicone breast implant ruptures it usually does not deflate, yet the filler gel does leak from it, which can migrate to the implant pocket; therefore, an intracapsular rupture (in-capsule leak) can become an extracapsular rupture (out-of-capsule leak), and each occurrence is resolved by explantation. Although the leaked silicone filler-gel can migrate from the chest tissues to elsewhere in the woman's body, most clinical complications are limited to the breast and armpit areas, usually manifested as granulomas (inflammatory nodules) and axillary lymphadenopathy (enlarged lymph glands in the armpit area).[41][42][43]
For the second part....it depends where your butt is starting at. There is a point in which there is too much pressure in the butt that no more fat can really be injected. Pressure kills the fat cells (which is why you cannot sit on the butt for a few weeks after surgery). It also means that we cannot just keep injecting if the gluteus has fully expanded and is not able to take any more. If you are starting with a small butt.....there is a smaller limit. If you are starting with a medium sized butt.....there is a bigger limit. I like to use power assisted "vibration expansion filling" to really push the boundaries of how much fat can be injected into the buttocks. This helps to expand the buttocks on the table and get more fat into more stubborn areas. Typically, even for smaller girls, I will inject at least 1000ml per side (and up to 1600ml for larger girls). After this, as you have probably read, 30-50% of the fat will either reabsorb or "not take". However, with the removal of a large amount of fat around your midsection combined with careful technique and contouring of the butt and hips, we can make a very large difference in your overall proportion. Best of luck to you!
Deciding how much fat to transfer to a patient’s buttocks is a decision made by the surgeon that takes safety, cosmetic result, and patient’s goals into account. I recommend reviewing your goals of surgery, by showing photos, or performing Vectra imaging in office, with your surgeon and listening to their recommendations for the safest, best-looking results possible.
Cosmetic surgeons use a variety of incision techniques for breast lift surgery; the exact technique used will vary based on a patient’s existing breast tissue, the amount of excess skin to be removed, and her personal goals. Your cosmetic surgeon will recommend the type of breast lift that will achieve optimal results with the least conspicuous scarring possible.

1998 Germany Federal Institute for Medicine and Medical Products Reported that "silicone breast implants neither cause auto-immune diseases nor rheumatic diseases and have no disadvantageous effects on pregnancy, breast-feeding capability, or the health of children who are breast-fed. There is no scientific evidence for the existence of silicone allergy, silicone poisoning, atypical silicone diseases or a new silicone disease."[32]
While more experienced surgeons may charge more for their expertise, that’s not always the case. “You should not choose a qualified surgeon based on high fees any more than you should choose one based on low fees,” says Boca Raton, Florida plastic surgeon Dr. Hilton Becker in a RealSelf Q&A. “The most important factors should be education, experience, certification, and your ability to feel comfortable with your surgeon.”
After reviewing the medical data, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration concluded that TDA-induced breast cancer was an infinitesimal health-risk to women with breast implants, and did not justify legally requiring physicians to explain the matter to their patients. In the event, polyurethane-coated breast implants remain in plastic surgery practice in Europe and in South America; and no manufacturer has sought FDA approval for medical sales of such breast implants in the U.S.[93]
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