For the first part, even though you did not post photos, based on your height and weight you would have plenty of fat to be able to take in my opinion. The relative limit on how much can be removed and send you home the same day safely is about 5 liters of liposuction/fat. I think you would easily be able to get to this upper limit based on your height and weight.
I had wrongly assumed he could simply flatten the hump and be done, but he explained that you can't sculpt one area without considering how it'll impact everything else. If he smoothed the bridge and did nothing else, my nose could wind up looking far too wide from the front. So ultimately, he would need to break my nose and seamlessly draw it in closer to create the precise size and shape I was after. He'd also have to reduce the cartilage at the tip and turn it up slightly, from 91 to 93 degrees. In the end, my nose would be smaller, with a straighter bridge, a refined tip, and more clearly defined nostrils.
Unfortunately, as time goes on it is often difficult for patients to remember the specifics of the type of breast augmentation surgery and implants that they had.  Your are not alone!  The easiest way to determine what type of implant you had is to request a copy of the operative report from either the hospital, surgery center or your surgeon's office.  The implant specifics are recorded on this document.  Your office record also includes this information.  If it has been over ten years since your procedure, sometimes these records are no longer available.  Ultrasound or MRI can help to answer this question but it is an expensive way to solve the mystery and not an indication for these procedures.  If you registered your implants with the manufacturer at the time of surgery, the company will have a record of this information.  Fortunately, this inforation is not absoltely critical to your health unless you are having a problem with your implants.  Your surgeon can often develop a reasonable treatment plan even without this information.  I would strongly recommend that you register your implants and purchase the affordable insurance program if you have surgery again.  These programs are helpful in storing vital information regarding your implant type, size, filler, model and lot number.  Should there be a recall or long term problem requiring additional surgery, this information is readily available.  There is often also some fiancial support to offset costs.  Investigate the options available by contacting your surgeon or the implant manufacturer's websites.
“The old saline implants offered peace of mind but a less realistic result; silicone gel implants offered a more realistic look and feel but with concerns about silent rupture as well as long term safety and complications. The timing could not be better for the structured breast implant, which uniquely offers women the benefits of natural look and feel in addition to an unparalleled safety profile and peace of mind. This would be my personal choice for breast augmentation and has become the choice the majority of informed women in my practice are making for themselves.”

The breast augmentation patient usually is a young woman whose personality profile indicates psychological distress about her personal appearance and her bodily self image, and a history of having endured criticism (teasing) about the aesthetics of her person.[2] The studies Body Image Concerns of Breast Augmentation Patients (2003) and Body Dysmorphic Disorder and Cosmetic Surgery (2006) reported that the woman who underwent breast augmentation surgery also had undergone psychotherapy, suffered low self-esteem, presented frequent occurrences of psychological depression, had attempted suicide, and suffered body dysmorphia, a type of mental illness.
In 1999, the Institute of Medicine published the Safety of Silicone Breast Implants (1999) study that reported no evidence that saline-filled and silicone-gel filled breast implant devices caused systemic health problems; that their use posed no new health or safety risks; and that local complications are “the primary safety issue with silicone breast implants”, in distinguishing among routine and local medical complications and systemic health concerns.”[113][114][115]

The Summary of Safety and Effectiveness for each of the FDA-approved saline- and silicone gel filled breast implants details safety information known at the time of FDA approval. As the FDA learns of new safety information, it requires companies to update their product labeling. The most current safety information about saline- and silicone gel-filled breast implants can be found in the labeling.

Make sure your cosmetic surgeon is board certified; this ensures that he or she is specifically trained and experienced in cosmetic surgery and that your procedure will take place in an accredited facility, which is essential for your safety. Finally, don’t choose a cosmetic surgeon based on price alone. Your safety & results are too important. Most cosmetic surgeons offer financing options to help patients budget procedure costs.
Because a breast implant is a Class III medical device of limited product-life, the principal rupture-rate factors are its age and design; Nonetheless, a breast implant device can retain its mechanical integrity for decades in a woman's body.[39] When a saline breast implant ruptures, leaks, and empties, it quickly deflates, and thus can be readily explanted (surgically removed). The follow-up report, Natrelle Saline-filled Breast Implants: a Prospective 10-year Study (2009) indicated rupture-deflation rates of 3–5 per cent at 3-years post-implantation, and 7–10 per cent rupture-deflation rates at 10-years post-implantation.[40]

Saline-filled breast implants contain a silicone outer shell filled with a sterile saltwater (saline) solution. Some are pre-filled and others are filled during the implant operation. Saline-filled implants come in different sizes and have either smooth or textured shells. The FDA approved saline-filled breast implants for breast augmentation in women age 18 or older and for breast reconstruction in women of any age. They are also used in revision surgeries, which correct or improve the result of an original surgery.


Case 22: This young woman was happy with her profile but wanted to reduce nasal width, tip boxiness, and nostril flare on front and three-quarter views. The combination of narrowing her bridge, tip refinement, and nostril reduction helped bring her nose into balance. At the same time, fat transfer to the under eye hollows did a fantastic job of brightening her eyes and giving her a more youthful look.
They are essentially very similar procedures. The difference is in the amount of breast tissue removed. In a breast lift procedure, the nipple areolar complex is lift to a better position on the breast, and some breast tissue is removed and the breast envelope tightened. In a breast reduction, the nipple areolar complex is also lifted, but much more breast tissue is removed. 
Many patients return to work within the first week after breast lift surgery, depending on the nature of their jobs, and resume most daily activities after a week or so. You will need to limit exercise other than walking for the first 2-6 weeks after a breast lift; your cosmetic surgeon will provide you with detailed instructions about when it is safe to resume any activity.
The current lifetime risk of BIA-ALCL in the U.S. is unknown, but estimates have ranged between estimated to be between 1 in 70,000 to 1 in 500,000 women with breast implants according to MD Anderson.[73] Certain geographic locations have demonstrated variable risks. For instance, a December 2016 update from the Therapeutic Goods Administration of Australia and New Zealand reported a risk of 1:1,000 to 1:10,000 for textured implants.".[71] To date (2017), there has not been a case of BIAL reported where the patient had only implantation of smooth shell breast implants or a textured tissue expander that was exchanged for a smooth implant. The paucity of cases reported in Asian populations has raised the possibility that there may be a range of genetic susceptibility to the phenomena, or alternatively merely reflect differences in how cases are identified and reported.
Silicone-filled Breast Implants. Silicone-filled breast implants are filled with a silicone gel. Over the years, the consistency of this silicone filling has changed. The first silicone breast implants were filled with a very thin, oily silicone. Currently, the silicone used in implants is a gel that is less likely to leak out of the shell if it ruptures. This gel is referred to as "cohesive." Some breast implants — called gummy bear breast implants — are even more cohesive, or "form-stable," and have the consistency of a gummy bear, thus the nickname.
The breast implant has no clinical bearing upon lumpectomy breast-conservation surgery for women who developed breast cancer after the implantation procedure, nor does the breast implant interfere with external beam radiation treatments (XRT); moreover, the post-treatment incidence of breast-tissue fibrosis is common, and thus a consequent increased rate of capsular contracture.[108] The study Breast Cancer Detection and Survival among Women with Cosmetic Breast Implants: Systematic Review and Meta-analysis of Observational Studies, reported an average later stage in the diagnoses of women who developed breast cancer after undergoing breast augmentation, when compared to breast cancer patients who had not undergone breast augmentation, although this did not ultimately affect the patients prognosis. The use of implants for breast reconstruction after breast cancer mastectomy appears to have no negative effect upon the incidence of cancer-related death.[105][109]
The IDEAL IMPLANT Structured Breast Implant is often compared to silicone gel breast implants because they both offer beautiful, natural looking results. But, beyond the aesthetic comparisons, the IDEAL IMPLANT Structured Breast Implant and silicone gel breast implants are very different. The IDEAL IMPLANT Structured Breast Implant is filled with saline for a woman’s peace of mind. Saline is naturally absorbed by the body in case of a rupture, and a rupture can be easily detected by simply looking at the breasts. Without silicone gel inside there is no need for repeated MRIs and no anxiety about silent ruptures. The risk of complications such as rupture and capsular contracture are also much lower with the IDEAL IMPLANT based on clinical trial results at 8 years. That means the cost of your primary breast augmentation is likely the only cost you need to consider when asking how much do breast implants cost.
Case 92: This procedure was all about correction of a droopy twisted tip. This patient was especially bothered by the tip’s tendency to drop and spread when she smiled, with a twist that made one nostril look higher than the other. After surgery, her nose is about as straight and symmetric as can be and the straighter bridge line makes her look younger.
Fat Transfer for a Natural Breast Augmentation will use the fat from another area on your body to create a modestly larger breast size. This can be used at the same time as fat grafting to reshape the breasts, as well as a breast lift. Many women choose to go with the fat transfer because they are not introducing any foreign substance to their body.
The cost of compression garments varies. Women who choose smaller implants may find that a sports bra provides plenty of support. The most important thing is to follow your surgeon's recommendations to ensure your breasts get enough support while they heal. Some surgeons will put you in a garment after surgery at no cost and only charge for additional garments. You can learn about what your surgeon does at your consultation.
“I’ve found that sometimes MRIs are not actually very reliable. In some instances, a patient’s MRI said the silicone gel implant had ruptured, and then when I went in to operate on it, it actually hadn’t. I’ve had one or two patients where an MRI showed the implant wasn’t ruptured, but based on my clinical exam I really thought there was a concern, so I went in and it turned out it was ruptured.” 

The main advantage of an open surgery, he said, is that it increases exposure of the anatomy for improved visualization, which allows the doctor to be more precise in his surgical maneuvers, and eliminates a key risk associated with the closed rhinoplasty, which is a distortion of the results when instruments are retracted through the nostrils. He believed the open method would be safest and most effective for me since he’d essentially be reworking my entire nose — refining not just the bridge but the tip as well.
In 2006, for the Inamed Corporation and for the Mentor Corporation, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration lifted its restrictions against using silicone-gel breast implants for breast reconstruction and for augmentation mammoplasty. Yet, the approval was conditional upon accepting FDA monitoring, the completion of 10-year-mark studies of the women who already had the breast implants, and the completion of a second, 10-year-mark study of the safety of the breast implants in 40,000 other women.[119] The FDA warned the public that breast implants do carry medical risks, and recommended that women who undergo breast augmentation should periodically undergo MRI examinations to screen for signs of either shell rupture or of filler leakage, or both conditions; and ordered that breast surgery patients be provided with detailed, informational brochures explaining the medical risks of using silicone-gel breast implants.[113]

Dr. Kolker then laid out his surgical plan for me: He'd perform an open rhinoplasty, explaining that the difference between an open and closed procedure amounts to a small incision on the underside of the columella (that skinny strip of skin between the nostrils), which can be seen only from below and fades rapidly. Both procedures require incisions inside the nose, but an open rhinoplasty adds that small columellar incision.
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