Post-operative patient surveys about mental health and quality-of-life, reported improved physical health, physical appearance, social life, self-confidence, self-esteem, and satisfactory sexual functioning. Furthermore, the women reported long-term satisfaction with their breast implant outcomes; some despite having suffered medical complications that required surgical revision, either corrective or aesthetic. Likewise, in Denmark, 8 per cent of breast augmentation patients had a pre-operative history of psychiatric hospitalization.[3][4][5][6][7][8][9][10][11]
There are four general types of breast implants, defined by their filler material: saline solution, silicone gel, structured and composite filler. The saline implant has an elastomer silicone shell filled with sterile saline solution during surgery; the silicone implant has an elastomer silicone shell pre-filled with viscous silicone gel; structured implants use nested elastomer silicone shells and two saline filled lumen; and the alternative composition implants featured miscellaneous fillers, such as soy oil, polypropylene string, etc. Composite implants are typically not recommended for use anymore and, in fact, their use is banned in the United States and Europe due to associated health risks and complications.
The ‘gummy bear’ implant comes in both round and teardrop shapes. They have a firmer gel, which may give a better shape and may last longer. The round gummy bear implant is often a good choice for women with looser tissues and who want a more durable implant that remains soft. The teardrop shaped gummy bear implant may be a good choice for women whose tissues are relatively tight and desire a very proportionate and natural looking enhancement with less fullness of the upper portion of the breast and more projection and fullness of the lower portion of the breast.
There are two main types of implants for you to consider: saline and silicone. Most people say the silicone implants feel and look more natural than saline, but they cost more. Silicone implants are typically about $1,000 more than saline, but if you’re interested in gummy bear implants—a type of silicone implant—expect to pay even more. In a RealSelf Q&A, Omaha, Nebraska plastic surgeon Dr. Richard J. Bruneteau says you should expect to pay “about $500 more than standard silicone implants.”
Once we set a date for surgery, Dr. Kolker prescribed various vitamins (C, B12, and zinc) to start taking one week prior to surgery to prep my body for the trauma and help speed recovery. I'd have to avoid red wine and blood thinners (like Advil) for two weeks beforehand. He prescribed pain medication, too, but said I may only need Tylenol post-op because the discomfort isn't all that bad. There would be lots of bruising and swelling, but after six weeks, he said, my appearance should be back to normal, only with a better nose. After three months, I'd be 75 percent healed, but the swelling wouldn't fully subside for one year. 

Manufacturer’s warranty programs can mitigate some of the costs of treating complications. But, the warranty payment is only available if a rupture is detected. Some surgeons fail to inform their patients of the need for periodic MRIs, or downplay the FDA recommendation in order to make a sale. “Many women don’t know about the maintenance costs and potential expenses of silicone gel implants,” reports Dr. Ellen Mahony, board-certified plastic surgeon in Westport, CT.  “Because rupture with a silicone gel implant is ‘silent,’ it can go undetected for an extended period, often not becoming obvious until the process of capsular contraction has begun.” Capsular contraction leads to a more complex surgery. That means added surgical costs which your warranty may not cover.
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