This category includes costs such as prescriptions for antibiotics and pain relievers and support garments that are worn after your procedure. Overall, miscellaneous costs are low. Your prescription costs will depend on how many your surgeon prescribes and how much of the cost your insurance covers. At minimum, you'll have prescriptions for pain medication and antibiotics. Some surgeons may also prescribe medications for:

Many different types of breast lifts are now available in conjunction with a breast reduction, including lifts just around the areola (periareolar), vertical/lollipop mastopexies (incision around the areola and down to the breast fold, and full breast lifts with an anchor incision. For patients who have very loose skin in the armpit or back, axillary or bra lifts are also often combined with breast reductions.
Dr. Rotemberg will examine the area of your body you would like to improve upon for muscle strength, skin elasticity, and fat loss, as well as the area in which she believes the fat should be transferred from. At this time, she will also ask you pertinent medical questions, and do a full exam, to make sure you are a good candidate for any procedure.
The amount of time the procedure takes is also an important factor. The longer and more complicated the procedure, the more you can expect to pay for it. This is why a breast augmentation with fat transfer and a breast lift with implants cost more than a standard breast augmentation with implants. Some surgeons include their fee in the price they give you for your entire procedure. Be sure to ask during your consultation!
The ASPS and the Plastic Surgery Foundation (PSF) have partnered with the FDA to study this condition and in doing so created the Patient Registry and Outcomes For breast Implants and anaplastic large cell Lymphoma Etiology and epidemiology (PROFILE). The United States FDA strongly encourages all physicians to report cases to PROFILE in an effort to better understand the role of breast implants in ALCL and the management of this disease.[74]
In 1997, the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) appointed the Institute of Medicine (IOM) of the U.S. National Academy of Sciences (NAS) to investigate the potential risks of operative and post-operative complications from the emplacement of silicone breast implants. The IOM's review of the safety and efficacy of silicone gel-filled breast implants, reported that the "evidence suggests diseases or conditions, such as connective tissue diseases, cancer, neurological diseases, or other systemic complaints or conditions are no more common in women with breast implants, than in women without implants" subsequent studies and systemic review found no causal link between silicone breast implants and disease.[113]
Case 43: Rhinoplasty in this pretty professional woman was all about removing the bump she had hated for years and correcting the tip droop and asymmetry that had worsened with age. Relatively small changes here have created a real sense of refinement while maintaining her long, elegant profile. A lower face and neck lift along with facial fat transfer helped to round out the enhancements in her already beautiful appearance.

I have had much experience in fat grafting to the buttocks for Brazillian Buttock Augmentation in Los Angeles. I have had patients from 105 lbs to more than 200 lbs. the best results were in those that had much fat available for harvesting. In my experience depending on the technique of harvesting, processing, and injecting the fat, at least 90% of the volume can stay. I have had several patients who have retained more than 90% of their buttock volume despite having had pregnacies, working out, and after more than 5 years.
Subfascial: the breast implant is emplaced beneath the fascia of the pectoralis major muscle; the subfascial position is a variant of the subglandular position for the breast implant.[77] The technical advantages of the subfascial implant-pocket technique are debated; proponent surgeons report that the layer of fascial tissue provides greater implant coverage and better sustains its position.[78]
The correction of capsular contracture might require an open capsulotomy (surgical release) of the collagen-fiber capsule, or the removal, and possible replacement, of the breast implant. Furthermore, in treating capsular contracture, the closed capsulotomy (disruption via external manipulation) once was a common maneuver for treating hard capsules, but now is a discouraged technique, because it can rupture the breast implant. Non-surgical treatments for collagen-fiber capsules include massage, external ultrasonic therapy, leukotriene pathway inhibitors such as zafirlukast (Accolate) or montelukast (Singulair), and pulsed electromagnetic field therapy (PEMFT).[60][61][62][63]
If your breast implants rupture, or you develop capsular contracture (two of the top reasons for revision surgery according to the FDA), you will need surgery to correct the issue. You can choose to remove your breast implants with or without replacement. This surgery will be similar in cost to your primary breast augmentation, or could be higher depending on the complexity. Again, health insurance companies do not usually cover costs associated with breast implants, even if you have a medical reason to remove them. As stated above, warranties may or may not cover costs as well.
In 2000, the FDA approved saline breast implant Premarket Approval Applications (PMA) containing the type and rate data of the local medical complications experienced by the breast surgery patients.[116] "Despite complications experienced by some women, the majority of those women still in the Inamed Corporation and Mentor Corporation studies, after three years, reported being satisfied with their implants."[113] The premarket approvals were granted for breast augmentation, for women at least 18 years old, and for women requiring breast reconstruction.[117][118]
In 1999, the Institute of Medicine published the Safety of Silicone Breast Implants (1999) study that reported no evidence that saline-filled and silicone-gel filled breast implant devices caused systemic health problems; that their use posed no new health or safety risks; and that local complications are “the primary safety issue with silicone breast implants”, in distinguishing among routine and local medical complications and systemic health concerns.”[113][114][115]
Before I left his office, Dr. Kolker took me through some before-and-after shots of some of his rhinoplasty patients. Many of them had noses similar to mine, and their "after" pictures were much like the ones Dr. Kolker had generated for me. He told me that of all the nose jobs he'd done in his career, only one time did he have to go back and operate again, and that was because the patient wanted a more drastic change. That clinched it for me: I knew I was in good hands and that my result would be subtle and not overly "done."
The amount of good quality, transferrable fat will depend on how much can be retrieved from the donor sites. This can be partially estimated after examination (the surgeon inspects and pinches the areas of potential fat harvest to get an idea of how much fat can realistically be harvested), but it is hard to know for sure until the procedure is well underway. Abdominal and love handle/flank fat tend to be the best sources because the fat is more easily retrieved and softer than back fat, but the back is also routinely liposuctioned in the BBL procedure to both obtain extra tissue for transfer and to improve the 360 degree shaping of the torso. I have transferred anywhere from 300cc per buttock to over 1200 in some patients, depending on the circumstances.

We strongly recommend you choose an implant type with your surgeon, who will be able to match the right type to accomplish your desired results. All available implants are considered good, safe choices. However, this article will explain the pros and cons of each of the three main types of breast implants so you can get an idea of what might be the best fit for you.


With each day that passed, I felt a bit better. My surgery was on a Monday, and by Thursday I was well enough to do some work from home, like answering emails. On Friday night, I went to see a movie, and it felt so great to be out. (At that point, the swelling had dropped to my jaw, the bruises had faded, and I looked fairly sane, save for the splint.) I spent most of the weekend running errands, working, and enjoying spring in Central Park. It was a little weird to be out in the splint, but not bad enough to keep me cooped up in my apartment. And I think being active helped me rebound faster.
In 1988, twenty-six years after the 1962 introduction of breast implants filled with silicone gel, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) investigated breast implant failures and the subsequent complications, and re-classified breast implant devices as Class III medical devices, and required from manufacturers the documentary data substantiating the safety and efficacy of their breast implant devices.[113] In 1992, the FDA placed silicone-gel breast implants in moratorium in the U.S., because there was “inadequate information to demonstrate that breast implants were safe and effective”. Nonetheless, medical access to silicone-gel breast implant devices continued for clinical studies of post-mastectomy breast reconstruction, the correction of congenital deformities, and the replacement of ruptured silicone-gel implants. The FDA required from the manufacturers the clinical trial data, and permitted their providing breast implants to the breast augmentation patients for the statistical studies required by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration.[113] In mid–1992, the FDA approved an adjunct study protocol for silicone-gel filled implants for breast reconstruction patients, and for revision-surgery patients. Also in 1992, the Dow Corning Corporation, a silicone products and breast implant manufacturer, announced the discontinuation of five implant-grade silicones, but would continue producing 45 other, medical-grade, silicone materials—three years later, in 1995, the Dow Corning Corporation went bankrupt when it faced large class action lawsuits claiming a variety of illnesses.[113]

Silicone-filled Breast Implants. Silicone-filled breast implants are filled with a silicone gel. Over the years, the consistency of this silicone filling has changed. The first silicone breast implants were filled with a very thin, oily silicone. Currently, the silicone used in implants is a gel that is less likely to leak out of the shell if it ruptures. This gel is referred to as "cohesive." Some breast implants — called gummy bear breast implants — are even more cohesive, or "form-stable," and have the consistency of a gummy bear, thus the nickname.


I awoke from surgery feeling just as overwhelmed and then crying happy tears. I blame the drugs...in part, anyway. I was in the recovery room with a splint on my nose. I had to go to the bathroom, and I remember feeling sort of drunk as I walked down the hall (again, drugs). When I got to the restroom, I thought, Should I look in the mirror? I did, very quickly, and what a relief! I could see the tip of my nose, and it already looked different. I figured if the splint was any indication of my new shape, I'd be thrilled, as it resembled a very smooth ski slope.
A woman wanting a reduction comes usually after having put up with the pain and in some cases embarrassment and hassle for years before she presents in front of surgeon. She experiences neck, back, shoulder pain, skin irritation and even infection, she feels self conscious and sick of breasts getting in the way of a normal life/shopping/exercising. 
Unfortunately, as time goes on it is often difficult for patients to remember the specifics of the type of breast augmentation surgery and implants that they had.  Your are not alone!  The easiest way to determine what type of implant you had is to request a copy of the operative report from either the hospital, surgery center or your surgeon's office.  The implant specifics are recorded on this document.  Your office record also includes this information.  If it has been over ten years since your procedure, sometimes these records are no longer available.  Ultrasound or MRI can help to answer this question but it is an expensive way to solve the mystery and not an indication for these procedures.  If you registered your implants with the manufacturer at the time of surgery, the company will have a record of this information.  Fortunately, this inforation is not absoltely critical to your health unless you are having a problem with your implants.  Your surgeon can often develop a reasonable treatment plan even without this information.  I would strongly recommend that you register your implants and purchase the affordable insurance program if you have surgery again.  These programs are helpful in storing vital information regarding your implant type, size, filler, model and lot number.  Should there be a recall or long term problem requiring additional surgery, this information is readily available.  There is often also some fiancial support to offset costs.  Investigate the options available by contacting your surgeon or the implant manufacturer's websites.
The cause of capsular contracture is unknown, but the common incidence factors include bacterial contamination, device-shell rupture, filler leakage, and hematoma. The surgical implantation procedures that have reduced the incidence of capsular contracture include submuscular emplacement, the use of breast implants with a textured surface (polyurethane-coated);[55][56][57] limited pre-operative handling of the implants, limited contact with the chest skin of the implant pocket before the emplacement of the breast implant, and irrigation of the recipient site with triple-antibiotic solutions.[58][59]
Many different types of breast lifts are now available in conjunction with a breast reduction, including lifts just around the areola (periareolar), vertical/lollipop mastopexies (incision around the areola and down to the breast fold, and full breast lifts with an anchor incision. For patients who have very loose skin in the armpit or back, axillary or bra lifts are also often combined with breast reductions.
Very slight changes to the structure of your nose — often measured in millimeters — can make a large difference in how your nose looks. Most of the time, an experienced surgeon can get results both of you are satisfied with. But in some cases, the slight changes aren't enough, and you and your surgeon might decide to do a second surgery for further changes. If this is the case, you must wait at least a year for the follow-up surgery, because your nose can go through changes during this time.

Fat transfer surgery is a hot topic among today’s elite plastic surgeons. Dr. Mess researched and trained in fat transfer during her six-year residency at Georgetown University Hospital and incorporated the procedure early in her practice. She has refined her technique to offer the advantages of fat transfer to augment and reconstruct. Dr. Mess performs fat transfer to the face, breast, hands, and buttocks to add volume and fullness and restore a youthful and vigorous appearance.
I felt particularly insecure about my nose when starting college, as I was presenting myself to the world, independently, for the first time. Whenever I met anyone new, I'd be very careful to talk to them only head-on, so they couldn't glimpse my profile. By 19, I was researching rhinoplasty surgery, and my dad even took me for a nose-job consultation, but I didn't feel the surgeon was a good fit, so we decided to table the idea.
This includes the cost of the implants, which ranges from $1,000 to $1,300 as well as a facility fee of $800 to $1,200, an anesthesia fee of $600 to $800 and the surgeon's fee that averages $4,005 for silicone-gel filled implants and $3,583 for saline implants. Patients in the western United States can expect to pay the highest average surgeon's fee of about $3,949, while patients in the south central part of the country generally pay lower fees with an average of $2,739.

When the patient is unsatisfied with the outcome of the augmentation mammoplasty; or when technical or medical complications occur; or because of the breast implants’ limited product life, it is likely she might require replacing the breast implants. Common revision surgery indications include major and minor medical complications, capsular contracture, shell rupture, and device deflation.[44] Revision incidence rates were greater for breast reconstruction patients, because of the post-mastectomy changes to the soft-tissues and to the skin envelope of the breast, and to the anatomical borders of the breast, especially in women who received adjuvant external radiation therapy.[44] Moreover, besides breast reconstruction, breast cancer patients usually undergo revision surgery of the nipple-areola complex (NAC), and symmetry procedures upon the opposite breast, to create a bust of natural appearance, size, form, and feel. Carefully matching the type and size of the breast implants to the patient's pectoral soft-tissue characteristics reduces the incidence of revision surgery. Appropriate tissue matching, implant selection, and proper implantation technique, the re-operation rate was 3 percent at the 7-year-mark, compared with the re-operation rate of 20 per cent at the 3-year-mark, as reported by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration.[64][65]


If you have considerable sagging, pendulous breasts, an anchor lift, which allows a cosmetic surgeon to remove a significant amount of excess skin and sagging tissues, may yield the best results. This technique involves 3 incisions: one around the edge of the areola, one vertically from the bottom of the areola to the breast crease, and one along the inframammary fold, hidden in the breast crease. Your cosmetic surgeon may also use this technique if you are having a breast reduction with lift. While the anchor lift comes with some visible scarring, these typically will fade significantly with proper care, and are easily hidden by a bikini top.

Submuscular: the breast implant is emplaced beneath the pectoralis major muscle, without releasing the inferior origin of the muscle proper. Total muscular coverage of the implant can be achieved by releasing the lateral muscles of the chest wall—either the serratus muscle or the pectoralis minor muscle, or both—and suturing it, or them, to the pectoralis major muscle. In breast reconstruction surgery, the submuscular implantation approach effects maximal coverage of the breast implants. This technique is rarely used in cosmetic surgery due to high risk of animation deformities.
Subfascial: the breast implant is emplaced beneath the fascia of the pectoralis major muscle; the subfascial position is a variant of the subglandular position for the breast implant.[77] The technical advantages of the subfascial implant-pocket technique are debated; proponent surgeons report that the layer of fascial tissue provides greater implant coverage and better sustains its position.[78]
Cosmetic surgeons use a variety of incision techniques for breast lift surgery; the exact technique used will vary based on a patient’s existing breast tissue, the amount of excess skin to be removed, and her personal goals. Your cosmetic surgeon will recommend the type of breast lift that will achieve optimal results with the least conspicuous scarring possible.

Bellesoma is a new breast reduction and lift technique that seems like it would be a great fit for you.  This procedure utilizes 3-D volumetric scanning and a multi-point measuring system to design a precise surgical blueprint exactly tailored to your body and the reduced breast size that you desire. The Bellesoma procedure reduces the sagging and weight of your breast, lifts your breast and reduces areola diameter, preserves the nipple sensation and ability to breast feed.  After Bellesoma, your breasts will look as full and perky as if an implant had been placed without using any implant, so no need to compromise.  One of the huge positives of this technique is that there is NO vertical incision traveling down the front of your breasts.


Case 71: Tip and nostril width and overall nasal projection made the nose feel dominant for this young woman. Rhinoplasty involved making her whole nose smaller by deprojecting, refining the tip, and removing some nostril flare. At the same time, a nasal fracture and breathing concerns were addressed. Neck Liposuction also helped to define and re-balance her jawline to create the improved facial proportions that she desired.


The ARTOURA™ Breast Tissue Expander or CONTOUR PROFILE® Breast Tissue Expander can be utilized for breast reconstruction after mastectomy, correction of an underdeveloped breast, scar revision, and tissue defect procedures. The expander is intended for temporary subcutaneous or submuscular implantation and is not intended for use beyond six months. Do not use the ARTOURA Tissue Expander nor CONTOUR PROFILE® Tissue Expander in patients where an MRI may be needed. The device could be moved by the MRI causing pain or displacement, potentially resulting in a revision surgery. The incidence of extrusion of the expander has been shown to increase when the expander has been placed in injured areas.
Case 40: Excessive nasal width can cause the nose to dominate other fine, delicate facial features. In Ethnic Rhinoplasty, the key to obtaining a more refined nose is to create a nasal framework upon which the thick skin will wrap around. This pretty young Persian woman wanted to reduce her nasal width, the fullness in her tip, and the sense that her tip was downturned. These six month photos show significant improvements in achieving these goals and her nose will only get better yet.
The amount of time the procedure takes is also an important factor. The longer and more complicated the procedure, the more you can expect to pay for it. This is why a breast augmentation with fat transfer and a breast lift with implants cost more than a standard breast augmentation with implants. Some surgeons include their fee in the price they give you for your entire procedure. Be sure to ask during your consultation!
After reviewing the medical data, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration concluded that TDA-induced breast cancer was an infinitesimal health-risk to women with breast implants, and did not justify legally requiring physicians to explain the matter to their patients. In the event, polyurethane-coated breast implants remain in plastic surgery practice in Europe and in South America; and no manufacturer has sought FDA approval for medical sales of such breast implants in the U.S.[93]
The study Safety and Effectiveness of Mentor’s MemoryGel Implants at 6 Years (2009), which was a branch study of the U.S. FDA's core clinical trials for primary breast augmentation surgery patients, reported low device-rupture rates of 1.1 per cent at 6-years post-implantation.[49] The first series of MRI evaluations of the silicone breast implants with thick filler-gel reported a device-rupture rate of 1 percent, or less, at the median 6-year device-age.[50] Statistically, the manual examination (palpation) of the woman is inadequate for accurately evaluating if a breast implant has ruptured. The study, The Diagnosis of Silicone Breast implant Rupture: Clinical Findings Compared with Findings at Magnetic Resonance Imaging (2005), reported that, in asymptomatic patients, only 30 per cent of the ruptured breast implants are accurately palpated and detected by an experienced plastic surgeon, whereas MRI examinations accurately detected 86 per cent of breast implant ruptures.[51] Therefore, the U.S. FDA recommended scheduled MRI examinations, as silent-rupture screenings, beginning at the 3-year-mark post-implantation, and then every two years, thereafter.[22] Nonetheless, beyond the U.S., the medical establishments of other nations have not endorsed routine MRI screening, and, in its stead, proposed that such a radiologic examination be reserved for two purposes: (i) for the woman with a suspected breast implant rupture; and (ii) for the confirmation of mammographic and ultrasonic studies that indicate the presence of a ruptured breast implant.[52]

I felt particularly insecure about my nose when starting college, as I was presenting myself to the world, independently, for the first time. Whenever I met anyone new, I'd be very careful to talk to them only head-on, so they couldn't glimpse my profile. By 19, I was researching rhinoplasty surgery, and my dad even took me for a nose-job consultation, but I didn't feel the surgeon was a good fit, so we decided to table the idea.

The good news is that both types of implants are considered safe. The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) removed silicone implants from the consumer market in 1992 as a precautionary measure after conflicting reports of possible complications surfaced. Some of these complications required breast implant removal. However, silicone gel-filled breast implants were fully exonerated and reapproved in 2006. (Read more about implants and the FDA.)


There are four general types of breast implants, defined by their filler material: saline solution, silicone gel, structured and composite filler. The saline implant has an elastomer silicone shell filled with sterile saline solution during surgery; the silicone implant has an elastomer silicone shell pre-filled with viscous silicone gel; structured implants use nested elastomer silicone shells and two saline filled lumen; and the alternative composition implants featured miscellaneous fillers, such as soy oil, polypropylene string, etc. Composite implants are typically not recommended for use anymore and, in fact, their use is banned in the United States and Europe due to associated health risks and complications.
When you decide to have breast augmentation surgery, part of the preparation will involve discussing the cost with your surgeon. You'll receive an itemized list of the costs associated with your surgery, and you'll have a chance to ask questions if you have them. Your breast augmentation cost can be broken down to include the following fees and items:
Once I firmly made the decision to move ahead with the rhinoplasty surgery, I told my family. With four siblings, there's never a shortage of opinions, but they were all extremely supportive. I inherited my nose from my mother, and when I told her the news, she revealed for the first time that she had once considered getting a nose job, too, which was majorly shocking, because my mom is very reserved and rarely criticizes, or even talks about, her appearance. She's just always seemed so comfortable in her skin. I really admire that about her.
Case 12: One of the things that we love about rhinoplasty is that we can combine dramatic changes such as straightening this patient’s nasal twist, and at the same time create some subtle enhancements such as refining and slightly deprojecting the tip while reducing the sense of columellar show. At 6 months, her nose now balances with her face and really brings out her beautiful eyes.
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