The first step in the breast implant surgery process is a consultation with a board-certified plastic surgeon who has extensive experience performing various types of breast surgery. During this meeting, the surgeon will perform an examination of your breast tissue, discuss your goals for surgery and tell you what you need to know about breast implants. Based on his or her examination, the surgeon will determine whether you are a candidate for surgery.
Sucking fat from your hips and thighs and injecting it into your boobs or butt may seem like a dream come true—and for some, it is. The process, called fat transfer or fat grafting, involves removing fat from one part of the body via a gentle liposuction, and then injecting it elsewhere. It works well all over the body, but is most commonly used on the face to enhance cheeks, fill hollow lower eyelids, and build up areas that have lost volume due to aging, explains New Jersey plastic surgeon Parham Ganchi, M.D. It’s also commonly used to plump up butts and to increase breast size and improve breast shape.
Dr. Mess typically harvests fat from the abdomen through a tiny incision in the belly button using state-of-the-art cannulas specifically designed to create small particle size for greater accuracy and for maximal fat cell viability. If the patient does not have adequate abdominal fat she may harvest from the thighs, love handles or other sites. The fat will be placed in a centrifuge where the fat will be separated from fluids and non-essential elements. The fat will then be transferred to the recipient site using precisely placed injections on multiple plains to achieve the structure and look you desire. On the day of the procedure, donor and graft sites will be laid out and marked following the plan designed during your consultation.  Dr. Mess uses markers to map the surgery and distinguish between donor and recipient sites.
The FDA has identified that breast implants may be associated with a rare form of cancer called anaplastic large-cell lymphoma, believed to be associated with chronic bacterial inflammation.[69] Similar ALCL phenomena have been seen with other types of medical implants including vascular access ports, orthopedic hip implants, and jaw (TMJ) implants. As of February 1, 2017, the FDA has received a total of 359 medical device reports of breast-implant-associated ALCL (BIALCL), including 9 deaths.[70] Most cases of breast implant-associated ALCL had implants in for many years prior to the condition, and are usually treated successfully by simple removal of the implant and the capsule surrounding the implant without the need for chemotherapy if no evidence of systemic disease exists. If women with implants present with delayed swelling or fluid collection, cytologic studies and test for a marker "CD30" are suggested. The American Society of Plastic Surgery (ASPS) states, "CD30 is the main diagnostic test that must be performed on the seroma fluid as routine pathology or H&E staining can frequently miss the diagnosis." [71] Diagnosis and treatment of breast implant associated ALCL now follows standardized guidelines established by the National Comprehensive Cancer Network.[72]
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