The study Safety and Effectiveness of Mentor’s MemoryGel Implants at 6 Years (2009), which was a branch study of the U.S. FDA's core clinical trials for primary breast augmentation surgery patients, reported low device-rupture rates of 1.1 per cent at 6-years post-implantation.[49] The first series of MRI evaluations of the silicone breast implants with thick filler-gel reported a device-rupture rate of 1 percent, or less, at the median 6-year device-age.[50] Statistically, the manual examination (palpation) of the woman is inadequate for accurately evaluating if a breast implant has ruptured. The study, The Diagnosis of Silicone Breast implant Rupture: Clinical Findings Compared with Findings at Magnetic Resonance Imaging (2005), reported that, in asymptomatic patients, only 30 per cent of the ruptured breast implants are accurately palpated and detected by an experienced plastic surgeon, whereas MRI examinations accurately detected 86 per cent of breast implant ruptures.[51] Therefore, the U.S. FDA recommended scheduled MRI examinations, as silent-rupture screenings, beginning at the 3-year-mark post-implantation, and then every two years, thereafter.[22] Nonetheless, beyond the U.S., the medical establishments of other nations have not endorsed routine MRI screening, and, in its stead, proposed that such a radiologic examination be reserved for two purposes: (i) for the woman with a suspected breast implant rupture; and (ii) for the confirmation of mammographic and ultrasonic studies that indicate the presence of a ruptured breast implant.[52]
Platinum is a catalyst used in the making of silicone implant polymer shells and other silicone devices used in medicine. The literature indicates that small amounts of platinum leaches (leaks) from these implants and is present in the surrounding tissue. The FDA reviewed the available studies from the medical literature on platinum and breast implants in 2002 and concluded there was little evidence suggesting toxicity from platinum in implant patients.[67] The FDA revisited this study and additional literature several years later, reaffirming prior conclusions that platinum catalysts used in implants is likely not ionized and therefore would not represent a risk to women.[68]
Case 44: One of the hardest things to accomplish in a nose job is giving a person a smaller version of the same nose. In Los Angeles, where small differences can mean everything, doing Finesse Rhinoplasty is common. Even at 6 months, you can see that, on profile, this patient’s tip is less projected but he still has a strong masculine profile. On base view, you will also notice the deprojection and the fact that alar base reduction can be done with no visible scars and maintenance of the natural nostril curve.
A: During your initial consultation, you will discuss your desired results with Dr. Hochstein so he can fully understand your expectations. You will be provided with before and after photos so that you can see some of the results Dr. Hochstein has achieved with his other patients. He will examine your breasts and evaluate other factors that may affect the outcome of your surgery. This will help determine the appropriate breast size and incision location.

Case 94: This patient was seeing the early signs of facial aging including loss of skin tone and elasticity, early jowling, and heaviness under the chin. A lower facelift along with fat transfer to the under eye and cheek area substantially improved the contour and even apparent texture of her skin, making her look noticeably younger. In addition, the overall effect was completed with a rhinoplasty focused on reducing the width, rounding, and thickness of her tip and nostrils which is a challenge in the setting of thick skin.
Breast implants are not lifetime devices. The longer a woman has implants, the more likely it is that she will need to have surgery to remove or replace them. The most frequent complications and adverse outcomes experienced by breast implant patients include capsular contracture, reoperation, and implant removal (with or without replacement). Other common complications include implant rupture with deflation, wrinkling, asymmetry, scarring, pain, and infection. In addition, women with breast implants may have a very low but increased likelihood of being diagnosed with anaplastic large cell lymphoma (ALCL).
Case 34: Hispanic Rhinoplasty in this patient meant removal of a high dorsal bump on profile and correction of a droopy-appearing tip. On front view, there is correction of a left nasal bone fracture and refinement of the nasal tip. All of this was done while still maintaining her unique individuality and while bearing in mind the various challenges Rhinoplasty in Latino patients present- thicker skin and softer cartilage.
Case 16: A crooked and overprojected nose draws the eye away from other beautiful features. In this pretty young woman, you can see how rhinoplasty transforms her face. Even at this early 3-month point, we see that her nose is more feminine and no longer dominates her otherwise delicate features. And, at the same time, it is balanced and ethnically-appropriate.

The breast implant has no clinical bearing upon lumpectomy breast-conservation surgery for women who developed breast cancer after the implantation procedure, nor does the breast implant interfere with external beam radiation treatments (XRT); moreover, the post-treatment incidence of breast-tissue fibrosis is common, and thus a consequent increased rate of capsular contracture.[108] The study Breast Cancer Detection and Survival among Women with Cosmetic Breast Implants: Systematic Review and Meta-analysis of Observational Studies, reported an average later stage in the diagnoses of women who developed breast cancer after undergoing breast augmentation, when compared to breast cancer patients who had not undergone breast augmentation, although this did not ultimately affect the patients prognosis. The use of implants for breast reconstruction after breast cancer mastectomy appears to have no negative effect upon the incidence of cancer-related death.[105][109]
Great question!  Without seeing you it is difficult to make an accurate assessment.  However as a general rule, the maximum amount of liposuction that can be performed in an outpatient setting, is around 5 liters due to the vast amount of fluid shift.  After filtration of the fluid, blood, devitalized fat cells, and lipids, generally you are left with about 2 liters of mature viable fat for injection.  Which means 1 liter to each side - which is a lot.  Take into account that you will loose anywhere from 20-40% of the volume so now we are at about 600-800cc's that will remain...that is with a maximum of 5 liter of liposuction.  If you have more than 5 liters of fat, then you may need to undergo this procedure a second time in order to harvest more fat for injection.
Platinum is a catalyst used in the making of silicone implant polymer shells and other silicone devices used in medicine. The literature indicates that small amounts of platinum leaches (leaks) from these implants and is present in the surrounding tissue. The FDA reviewed the available studies from the medical literature on platinum and breast implants in 2002 and concluded there was little evidence suggesting toxicity from platinum in implant patients.[67] The FDA revisited this study and additional literature several years later, reaffirming prior conclusions that platinum catalysts used in implants is likely not ionized and therefore would not represent a risk to women.[68]
Structured implants were approved by the FDA and Health Canada in 2014 as a third form of breast implant.[97] Structured implants incorporate both saline and silicone gel implant technology. The filler is only saline solution in case of rupture and has a natural feel like silicone gel implants.[98] The implant uses an internal structure which consists of a series of nested shells that support the upper pole with the two lumen being filled with only saline. The implant is inserted empty and then filled once in place which requires less of an incision than pre-filled implants.[97] If one of the lumen of the structured implant ruptures, it leaks and empties. The other lumen remain intact and the implant only partially deflates, allowing for ease of explant and replacement.[97]

Breast reconstruction may be performed after mastectomy, to rebuild injured or congenitally deformed breasts, or as part of gender reassignment surgery. As part of the reconstruction process, a breast tissue expander may be used to stretch the patient's tissue for insertion of an implant or the patient's own tissue. Tissue expanders are like thick-walled silicone balloons, come in different sizes and shapes, and may have a smooth or textured outer surface. They are implanted under the breast skin, tissue, or chest muscle, and are regulated by the FDA as medical devices. In immediate reconstruction, the expander is inserted immediately following mastectomy. For patients who choose delayed reconstruction, the expander is implanted in a separate surgery months or years later.
Some might think that this patient had had previous rhinoplasty with tip collapse, but she did not. Occasionally, the shape of the tip cartilages is very vertically-oriented, causing a deep groove in the nostril. She felt this, along with her marked tip crookedness, drew unwanted attention to her nose. Now, her nose is smaller, smoother, more defined, and just blends with the rest of her face. 
×