When compared to the results achieved with a silicone-gel breast implant, the saline implant can yield acceptable results, of increased breast-size, smoother hemisphere-contour, and realistic texture; yet, it is likelier to cause cosmetic problems, such as the rippling and the wrinkling of the breast-envelope skin, accelerated lower breast pole stretch, and technical problems, such as the presence of the implant being noticeable to the eye and to the touch. The occurrence of such cosmetic problems is likelier in the case of the woman with very little breast tissue, and in the case of the woman who requires post-mastectomy breast reconstruction; thus, the silicone-gel implant is the technically superior prosthetic device for breast augmentation, and for breast reconstruction. In the case of the woman with much breast tissue, for whom sub-muscular emplacement is the recommended surgical approach, saline breast implants can produce an aesthetic result much like that afforded by silicone breast implants, albeit with greater implant palpability.[90]
Case 78: A combination approach was used here to create a really meaningful but completely natural transformation. Otoplasty made prominent ears all but disappear from the field of view and no longer distract or draw attention. At the same time, rhinoplasty, chin augmentation, and neck liposuction accomplished were able to remove a nasal hump and overprojection while improving chin and neck laxity to achieve a nice overall balance.
For the first part, even though you did not post photos, based on your height and weight you would have plenty of fat to be able to take in my opinion. The relative limit on how much can be removed and send you home the same day safely is about 5 liters of liposuction/fat. I think you would easily be able to get to this upper limit based on your height and weight.
In 2006, for the Inamed Corporation and for the Mentor Corporation, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration lifted its restrictions against using silicone-gel breast implants for breast reconstruction and for augmentation mammoplasty. Yet, the approval was conditional upon accepting FDA monitoring, the completion of 10-year-mark studies of the women who already had the breast implants, and the completion of a second, 10-year-mark study of the safety of the breast implants in 40,000 other women.[119] The FDA warned the public that breast implants do carry medical risks, and recommended that women who undergo breast augmentation should periodically undergo MRI examinations to screen for signs of either shell rupture or of filler leakage, or both conditions; and ordered that breast surgery patients be provided with detailed, informational brochures explaining the medical risks of using silicone-gel breast implants.[113]
By and large, there is no 'perfect type' of breast implant. What looked stunning on one of your best friends doesn't necessarily mean that the same implant will be the best choice for you. This is why we recommend face-to-face consultations; an honest discussion with an experienced, knowledgeable plastic surgeon about your desired enhancement is a must. And you'll want to consider your surgeon's opinion and recommendations based on your existing body type and physical assessment.
When you decide to have breast augmentation surgery, part of the preparation will involve discussing the cost with your surgeon. You'll receive an itemized list of the costs associated with your surgery, and you'll have a chance to ask questions if you have them. Your breast augmentation cost can be broken down to include the following fees and items: 

I never expected such amazing results. The cost and recovery time was completely worth it. My doctor was very honest and informed me that it is pretty much impossible to have perfectly symmetrical breasts. However he proved himself wrong, my breasts are completely even and look as if they have never been touched. He went through my nipples so there is no scarring whatsoever. It was a perfect procedure.
The human body's immune response to a surgically installed foreign object—breast implant, cardiac pacemaker, orthopedic prosthesis—is to encapsulate it with scar tissue capsules of tightly woven collagen fibers, in order to maintain the integrity of the body by isolating the foreign object, and so tolerate its presence. Capsular contracture—which should be distinguished from normal capsular tissue—occurs when the collagen-fiber capsule thickens and compresses the breast implant; it is a painful complication that might distort either the breast implant, or the breast, or both.
The procedure is accomplished by using the skin of the lower pole of the breast (the part below the nipple that sits in the bra cup) to shape the whole breast into a perky dome, then straps are made of the extra skin, anchoring it to the underlying chest muscle so that there is virtually no chance of repeat sagging.  The skin that above your nipple and below your collar bone is utilized to cover the perky, lifted dome that has been created and then a new (usually smaller) circular opening for the areola is placed at the high point of the cone, creating your new lifted, full and shapely breast.
Although reviewing before and after photographs is an important element in selecting the right rhinoplasty surgeon, choosing your surgeon solely on the basis of website photos is ill-advised. Indeed, countless disappointed rhinoplasty patients can attest to the deceptive and misleading nature of many rhinoplasty websites. Moreover, viewing online photos is no substitute for the consultation visit, where I can share numerous other before and after photos, many with noses similar in appearance to your own – a far more meaningful comparison. Although I have been slow to incorporate internet marketing into my rhinoplasty practice, the growing number of individuals who look to the internet as their sole source of medical information cannot be overlooked. Consequently, I offer this website as a source of candid information to equip the prospective rhinoplasty patient with accurate information and honest advice.
Case 25: This patient had what is called a tension nose wherein a convexity on the bridge pushes the tip forward and down. Notice how this also puts tension on the upper lip and appears to tether it from inside. a combination of straightening, improving breathing, removing the hump, and setting the tip appropriately also helps to relax the upper lip and complete the look.
The current lifetime risk of BIA-ALCL in the U.S. is unknown, but estimates have ranged between estimated to be between 1 in 70,000 to 1 in 500,000 women with breast implants according to MD Anderson.[73] Certain geographic locations have demonstrated variable risks. For instance, a December 2016 update from the Therapeutic Goods Administration of Australia and New Zealand reported a risk of 1:1,000 to 1:10,000 for textured implants.".[71] To date (2017), there has not been a case of BIAL reported where the patient had only implantation of smooth shell breast implants or a textured tissue expander that was exchanged for a smooth implant. The paucity of cases reported in Asian populations has raised the possibility that there may be a range of genetic susceptibility to the phenomena, or alternatively merely reflect differences in how cases are identified and reported.
Dr. Mess typically harvests fat from the abdomen through a tiny incision in the belly button using state-of-the-art cannulas specifically designed to create small particle size for greater accuracy and for maximal fat cell viability. If the patient does not have adequate abdominal fat she may harvest from the thighs, love handles or other sites. The fat will be placed in a centrifuge where the fat will be separated from fluids and non-essential elements. The fat will then be transferred to the recipient site using precisely placed injections on multiple plains to achieve the structure and look you desire. On the day of the procedure, donor and graft sites will be laid out and marked following the plan designed during your consultation.  Dr. Mess uses markers to map the surgery and distinguish between donor and recipient sites.
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