1996 France Agence Nationale pour le Developpement de l’Evaluation Medicale (ANDEM) [National Agency for Medical Development and Evaluation][30] French original: "Nous n'avons pas observé de connectivité ni d'autre pathologie auto-immune susceptible d'être directement ou indirectement induite par la présence d'un implant mammaire en particulier en gel de silicone...."
Sucking fat from your hips and thighs and injecting it into your boobs or butt may seem like a dream come true—and for some, it is. The process, called fat transfer or fat grafting, involves removing fat from one part of the body via a gentle liposuction, and then injecting it elsewhere. It works well all over the body, but is most commonly used on the face to enhance cheeks, fill hollow lower eyelids, and build up areas that have lost volume due to aging, explains New Jersey plastic surgeon Parham Ganchi, M.D. It’s also commonly used to plump up butts and to increase breast size and improve breast shape.
The procedure is accomplished by using the skin of the lower pole of the breast (the part below the nipple that sits in the bra cup) to shape the whole breast into a perky dome, then straps are made of the extra skin, anchoring it to the underlying chest muscle so that there is virtually no chance of repeat sagging.  The skin that above your nipple and below your collar bone is utilized to cover the perky, lifted dome that has been created and then a new (usually smaller) circular opening for the areola is placed at the high point of the cone, creating your new lifted, full and shapely breast. 

Saline-filled breast implants contain a silicone outer shell filled with a sterile saltwater (saline) solution. Some are pre-filled and others are filled during the implant operation. Saline-filled implants come in different sizes and have either smooth or textured shells. The FDA approved saline-filled breast implants for breast augmentation in women age 18 or older and for breast reconstruction in women of any age. They are also used in revision surgeries, which correct or improve the result of an original surgery.
Does the nipple/areola sit below the crease underneath my breast? One trait cosmetic surgeons frequently look for when evaluating a breast lift candidate is the position of the nipple/areola in relation to the inframammary fold, or crease beneath the breast. Try this test: slide a plain sheet of paper underneath your breast (no bra) so it sits against the breast crease. When looking in the mirror, do your nipples sit below the top edge of the paper? If so, this is a good indication that you have enough sagging to warrant a breast lift.
They are essentially very similar procedures. The difference is in the amount of breast tissue removed. In a breast lift procedure, the nipple areolar complex is lift to a better position on the breast, and some breast tissue is removed and the breast envelope tightened. In a breast reduction, the nipple areolar complex is also lifted, but much more breast tissue is removed. 

“I’ve found that sometimes MRIs are not actually very reliable. In some instances, a patient’s MRI said the silicone gel implant had ruptured, and then when I went in to operate on it, it actually hadn’t. I’ve had one or two patients where an MRI showed the implant wasn’t ruptured, but based on my clinical exam I really thought there was a concern, so I went in and it turned out it was ruptured.”


Dr. Mess typically harvests fat from the abdomen through a tiny incision in the belly button using state-of-the-art cannulas specifically designed to create small particle size for greater accuracy and for maximal fat cell viability. If the patient does not have adequate abdominal fat she may harvest from the thighs, love handles or other sites. The fat will be placed in a centrifuge where the fat will be separated from fluids and non-essential elements. The fat will then be transferred to the recipient site using precisely placed injections on multiple plains to achieve the structure and look you desire. On the day of the procedure, donor and graft sites will be laid out and marked following the plan designed during your consultation.  Dr. Mess uses markers to map the surgery and distinguish between donor and recipient sites.
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