The good news is that both types of implants are considered safe. The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) removed silicone implants from the consumer market in 1992 as a precautionary measure after conflicting reports of possible complications surfaced. Some of these complications required breast implant removal. However, silicone gel-filled breast implants were fully exonerated and reapproved in 2006. (Read more about implants and the FDA.)
2. You buttock's structural anatomy is also an important factor.  A V-shaped buttock typically requires more fat transfer to achieve a satisfactory improvement than an A-shaped buttock.  Transferred fat cells need to grow their own blood supply from the surrounding buttock tissues in order to survive.  In order for this to happen, the transferred fat cells need to be gently interwoven between your buttocks' living cells to survive.  Therefore, each person's buttocks can only receive a certain amount of fat, and exceeding that amount will not be effective.  A generous amount of fat is typically transferred at the time of surgery, knowing that some of the fat will go away during the recovery period.
Another option is to consider getting your breast implants at a teaching hospital from a learning resident. You won’t get the delicate skill of an experienced, board-certified surgeon, but teaching hospital residents are “assisted by established, experienced, private attending surgeons,” says Beverly Hills plastic surgeon Dr. Robin T.W. Yuan in a RealSelf Q&A. 
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