Don't be afraid to ask questions. Make a list of questions you want to ask your physician and bring it with you to your Botox consultation. That way you won't forget what you want to ask. Ask how much the treatment will cost, how many units of Botox you will need, how long the he/she has been giving Botox injections, etc. Ask about side effects, risks, and how you should take care of your skin after Botox and how often someone with your skin condition should get Botox.

Rhinoplasties, like other surgeries, especially cosmetic ones, can cost vastly different amounts. The price of any surgery varies with the complexity of the procedure, the expertise and reputation of the surgeon, and the geographic region in which the surgery is to be performed. Prices for the surgery can range anywhere from $3,000 to $15,000. Typically, whatever the fee is, the cost of rhinoplasty does not include anesthesia, operating room facilities, or other related expenses.
How much you’ll swell really depends on you and on your surgeon’s technique—not so much the type of rhinoplasty you had. Dr. William Portuese, a facial plastic surgeon in Seattle, says that “The amount of swelling after a rhinoplasty procedure depends upon the type of rhinoplasty performed [open versus closed], the thickness of the skin, the amount of alteration required to the nasal tip, and the patient’s variability with the healing process itself.” He notes that “Some patients require taping and steroid shots in the tip of the nose to reduce swelling in that area for the first several months after the procedure.” According to Dr. Miller, “A very clean open rhinoplasty can result in minimal swelling, while with a closed procedure that isn’t performed in the ideal tissue and cartilage, you can have a lot more swelling. If the dissection travels through soft tissue or muscle on top of the cartilage, more bleeding and swelling will develop.” He notes that most people can also expect some bleeding from days two to five, but it should lessen with each passing day.
You can also ask to see before and after photos and testimonials from past patients. In addition to making sure your surgeon is highly experienced, you should feel comfortable talking to him or her. Do you feel the surgeon is hearing you and understanding your goals for the procedure? Establishing a rapport with the surgeon is extremely important to ensure that you get the results you want. 

Do not receive BOTOX® Cosmetic if you: are allergic to any of the ingredients in BOTOX® Cosmetic (see Medication Guide for ingredients); had an allergic reaction to any other botulinum toxin product such as Myobloc® (rimabotulinumtoxinB), Dysport® (abobotulinumtoxinA), or Xeomin® (incobotulinumtoxinA); have a skin infection at the planned injection site.
Be on the same page as your doctor - Make sure both you and your physician are clear about what facial areas you want to treat, how you ideally want them to be fixed, and what the ideal final result may be. Different people have different aesthetics. For instance, if the "frozen face" look is your doctor's definition of successful Botox but you disagree, you better make sure both of you are aiming for the same target or you'll end up with a result your doctor thinks is beautiful but you think is horrific.
Insurance companies rarely cover rhinoplasty; it’s usually considered an elective cosmetic procedure. The exception is if you have an injury or a breathing problem that makes the surgery medically necessary. “Sometimes insurance will cover surgery performed to correct post-traumatic deformities,” says Miami plastic surgeon Dr. Paul Afrooz in a RealSelf Q&A. “Insurance will pay for the portion of a rhinoplasty that is done to improve your breathing, such as correcting a deviated septum [septoplasty] or reconstructing collapsed breathing passages.”
As with any medical/surgical treatment, individual results may vary. Only a surgeon/physician can determine whether reconstruction or augmentation>is an appropriate course of treatment. The following are general adverse events associated with breast implant surgery: Device Rupture, Capsular contracture, Infection, Hematoma/Seroma, Pain, Reoperation, Implant removal, changes in Nipple and Breast Sensation, unsatisfactory results, breast-feeding complications. Other reported conditions are listed in the Product Insert Data Sheet (PIDS). See full list in the PIDS for the product information. These potential adverse events, including contraindications, warnings, and precautions need to be discussed with your doctor prior to surgery.
A rhinoplasty, commonly called a nose job, is a surgical procedure that changes the shape and, often, the size of your nose. If your nose has a prominent bump, crooked bridge, or wide tip, or it seems too big (or even too small) in relation to the rest of your facial features, surgical rhinoplasty could be your best option to correct it. It’s sometimes combined (and often confused) with a septoplasty—the surgical correction of a deviated septum, a condition where the wall between your nasal passages is crooked. A septoplasty is performed to improve breathing, while a rhinoplasty is usually performed for cosmetic enhancement.  Both procedures can be performed simultaneously under one anesthetic, with one recovery period.
Rhinoplasties, like other surgeries, especially cosmetic ones, can cost vastly different amounts. The price of any surgery varies with the complexity of the procedure, the expertise and reputation of the surgeon, and the geographic region in which the surgery is to be performed. Prices for the surgery can range anywhere from $3,000 to $15,000. Typically, whatever the fee is, the cost of rhinoplasty does not include anesthesia, operating room facilities, or other related expenses.
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