Rhinoplasty, a surgical procedure commonly known as a “nose job,” has become much more common in recent years. There are several reasons for this. For one thing, increasing media use focuses wide attention on the successful surgeries of celebrities (and even ordinary individuals). For another, the culture as a whole has increasingly accepted various means of improving and enhancing one’s appearance. The third, and perhaps most important, reason for the popularity of rhinoplasty is the astonishing improvements that have been made in the operation itself.
One of the main things to keep in mind regarding medical tourism is how difficult it may be to see or even contact your doctor after surgery. Follow-up appointments are extremely important. When surgery is performed internationally, patients either miss post-operative appointments or have to stay in the area for an extended period of time. When you have surgery closer to home, you can more easily attend these appointments and visit your surgeon if any other problems or concerns arise. Many surgeons like myself will revise their own work at no additional charge except for anesthesia fees or surgical venue fees.

The results are usually permanent, aside from normal changes that come with the aging process. If you’re really not happy with your results or have breathing difficulties once your nose has healed, you may be a candidate for a revision rhinoplasty. In many cases, scar tissue is the main culprit. “The force of a scar is very strong,” says Dr. Miller. “It can pull a nose one way or another—push it in, pull it out, turn it.” When this happens, a surgeon has to go back in and tweak the work. 


Tip: Learn about the possible complications of breast augmentation, which include breast pain, changes in nipple sensation and hardening of the breast tissue around the implant. The FDA provides information on risks. Also, be aware that if you choose to have the implants removed, your breasts probably will not look the same as they did before surgery.

A rhinoplasty, commonly called a nose job, is a surgical procedure that changes the shape and, often, the size of your nose. If your nose has a prominent bump, crooked bridge, or wide tip, or it seems too big (or even too small) in relation to the rest of your facial features, surgical rhinoplasty could be your best option to correct it. It’s sometimes combined (and often confused) with a septoplasty—the surgical correction of a deviated septum, a condition where the wall between your nasal passages is crooked. A septoplasty is performed to improve breathing, while a rhinoplasty is usually performed for cosmetic enhancement.  Both procedures can be performed simultaneously under one anesthetic, with one recovery period.
“I’ve found that sometimes MRIs are not actually very reliable. In some instances, a patient’s MRI said the silicone gel implant had ruptured, and then when I went in to operate on it, it actually hadn’t. I’ve had one or two patients where an MRI showed the implant wasn’t ruptured, but based on my clinical exam I really thought there was a concern, so I went in and it turned out it was ruptured.”
The results are usually permanent, aside from normal changes that come with the aging process. If you’re really not happy with your results or have breathing difficulties once your nose has healed, you may be a candidate for a revision rhinoplasty. In many cases, scar tissue is the main culprit. “The force of a scar is very strong,” says Dr. Miller. “It can pull a nose one way or another—push it in, pull it out, turn it.” When this happens, a surgeon has to go back in and tweak the work. 

Multiple procedures can be combined in one surgery; for example, septoplasty (which straightens or repositions the bone and cartilage between your nostrils) is often performed along with rhinoplasty. The additional procedure will increase the total cost of the surgery, but (because it can solve breathing problems) the septoplasty may be covered by your insurance. Rhinoplasty, on the other hand, is usually considered elective and rarely covered.
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