Spread of toxin effects. The effect of botulinum toxin may affect areas away from the injection site and cause serious symptoms including: loss of strength and all-over muscle weakness, double vision, blurred vision and drooping eyelids, hoarseness or change or loss of voice, trouble saying words clearly, loss of bladder control, trouble breathing, and trouble swallowing.

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Tell your doctor about all your medical conditions, including: plans to have surgery; had surgery on your face; have trouble raising your eyebrows; drooping eyelids; any other abnormal facial change; are pregnant or plan to become pregnant (it is not known if BOTOX® Cosmetic can harm your unborn baby); are breast-feeding or plan to (it is not known if BOTOX® Cosmetic passes into breast milk).
Getting a nose job is a big decision and you want to make sure you’re getting the best procedure possible. A factor in any kind of procedure is costly, and you may be specifically be wondering how much does a good nose job cost? If you’ve been doing your research, you know that the costs of rhinoplasty widely vary. Many factors affect the total cost of a nose job, and high price doesn’t always mean high quality. Typically, the surgeon’s fee for a primary rhinoplasty is between $6,000-10,000. Revisions typically are a bit more costly particularly when they require structural grafting, which is needed if the skeletal framework is weakened or malpositioned.
However, it’s not without real risks. A liquid nose job should be done only by a skilled plastic surgeon with extensive knowledge of facial anatomy, using only hyaluronic-acid-based fillers. Misplaced filler can cut off blood flow and cause skin necrosis (tissue death). If it’s caught quickly, the hyaluronic-acid filler can be dissolved by a doctor, using an injection of hyaluronidase. But because this risk is serious, fillers have not been approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration for use in the nose. 
A rhinoplasty, commonly called a nose job, is a surgical procedure that changes the shape and, often, the size of your nose. If your nose has a prominent bump, crooked bridge, or wide tip, or it seems too big (or even too small) in relation to the rest of your facial features, surgical rhinoplasty could be your best option to correct it. It’s sometimes combined (and often confused) with a septoplasty—the surgical correction of a deviated septum, a condition where the wall between your nasal passages is crooked. A septoplasty is performed to improve breathing, while a rhinoplasty is usually performed for cosmetic enhancement.  Both procedures can be performed simultaneously under one anesthetic, with one recovery period.

Ok, rhinoplasty does NOT cost a million dollars.  Yippee is what you are thinking!  The cost of a rhinoplasty varies greatly depending on how much work is involved.  Revision rhinoplasty costs more than primary rhinoplasty.  Prices for primary rhinoplasty for surgeon's fees are between $2500-$6000.  Revision rhinoplasty can range from $5000 to over $7500.... READ MORE


While you can read about all of this online, it's best to hear it straight from your doctor's mouth. Also, ask about what your doctor will do on the off chance that something goes wrong with your Botox treatment. If you have significant bruising, will he give you a discounted v-beam laser treatment to minimize the bruising? If you end up with Spock brows, will he fix them free of charge? What if your Botox wears off in a week, will he give you an additional touch-up for free? Do not be afraid to ask questions! It's better to have answers before than after.
However, it’s not without real risks. A liquid nose job should be done only by a skilled plastic surgeon with extensive knowledge of facial anatomy, using only hyaluronic-acid-based fillers. Misplaced filler can cut off blood flow and cause skin necrosis (tissue death). If it’s caught quickly, the hyaluronic-acid filler can be dissolved by a doctor, using an injection of hyaluronidase. But because this risk is serious, fillers have not been approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration for use in the nose. 

Post treatment I was a left a little red and blotchy, so I cancelled any meetings I had straight after. Although the redness soon faded I was left with a few tiny pin prick points. I am told that bruising is common, but it all depends on how sensitive your skin is. I was also left with a slight headache, almost like I’d been wearing a swim cap for a few days. This too didn’t last longer than a few hours, and wasn’t anything that two paracetamol couldn’t fix. If you do experience a headache for longer than 48 hours, or any other symptoms like nausea or visual disturbances (although rare) you are advised to contact your practitioner.
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