Look for a board-certified plastic surgeon from the American Board of Plastic Surgery who has extensive experience performing rhinoplasties and other areas of facial plastic surgery. You can search for one by geographic region on A Board Certified Plastic Surgeon Resource. Though they typically charge higher fees, these surgeons have all undergone intensive surgical training and can help ensure that you receive the best possible treatment.
To apply for insurance coverage for a functional rhinoplasty, your surgeon can perform one of several tests. A CT scan shows irregularities within the nose that are not visible to the naked eye. An acoustic rhinometry is a test that maps the inside of a patient's nose. A rhinomanometry tests the level of airflow within the nostrils. In some cases, insurance companies require that patients show that they have attempted to treat nasal obstruction with other treatments. These may include antihistamines, allergy desensitizing injections, and steroid spray.
If you’re having what’s called an open rhinoplasty, the surgeon will make an incision (about 6 millimeters long) in the skin between the nostrils. “Open rhinoplasty is a very common technique, where the skin is lifted upward like the hood on a car,” says Dr. Ronald Schuster, a Baltimore plastic surgeon, in a RealSelf Q&A about open vs. closed rhinoplasties. If you’re having a closed rhinoplasty, all incisions are placed on the inside of the nose, so there are no external scars.
A few weeks before your surgery, you will meet with the surgeon to discuss your personal goals and plan out the procedure. You will also have follow-up appointments post-op to monitor your progress. After surgery, you will need ice packs, gauze and certain pain medication for pain management purposes. All of these pre and post-op appointments and supplies are necessary to take into account when determining what the overall cost of the procedure will be. Be sure to ask your surgeon’s office whether appointments and supplies are included as a package cost and what, if any, additional supplies you may need to buy as you recover from your nose job.
Be on the same page as your doctor - Make sure both you and your physician are clear about what facial areas you want to treat, how you ideally want them to be fixed, and what the ideal final result may be. Different people have different aesthetics. For instance, if the "frozen face" look is your doctor's definition of successful Botox but you disagree, you better make sure both of you are aiming for the same target or you'll end up with a result your doctor thinks is beautiful but you think is horrific.
In recent years, medical tourism, or going outside the U.S. for a surgery or procedure, has become more popular. Patients go to other countries to have rhinoplasty and other surgery performed at a lower cost. While several other countries, such as South Korea, Columbia, and Italy, may have surgeons willing to perform rhinoplasty at a low cost, the quality and safety standards may not be as closely regulated as they are in the U.S.
Rhinoplasty, a surgical procedure commonly known as a “nose job,” has become much more common in recent years. There are several reasons for this. For one thing, increasing media use focuses wide attention on the successful surgeries of celebrities (and even ordinary individuals). For another, the culture as a whole has increasingly accepted various means of improving and enhancing one’s appearance. The third, and perhaps most important, reason for the popularity of rhinoplasty is the astonishing improvements that have been made in the operation itself.
In recent years, medical tourism, or going outside the U.S. for a surgery or procedure, has become more popular. Patients go to other countries to have rhinoplasty and other surgery performed at a lower cost. While several other countries, such as South Korea, Columbia, and Italy, may have surgeons willing to perform rhinoplasty at a low cost, the quality and safety standards may not be as closely regulated as they are in the U.S.
Tell your doctor if you have received any other botulinum toxin product in the last 4 months; have received injections of botulinum toxin such as Myobloc®, Dysport®, or Xeomin® in the past (tell your doctor exactly which product you received); have recently received an antibiotic by injection; take muscle relaxants; take an allergy or cold medicine; take a sleep medicine; take aspirin-like products or blood thinners.

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