Post treatment I was a left a little red and blotchy, so I cancelled any meetings I had straight after. Although the redness soon faded I was left with a few tiny pin prick points. I am told that bruising is common, but it all depends on how sensitive your skin is. I was also left with a slight headache, almost like I’d been wearing a swim cap for a few days. This too didn’t last longer than a few hours, and wasn’t anything that two paracetamol couldn’t fix. If you do experience a headache for longer than 48 hours, or any other symptoms like nausea or visual disturbances (although rare) you are advised to contact your practitioner.
Another option is to consider getting your breast implants at a teaching hospital from a learning resident. You won’t get the delicate skill of an experienced, board-certified surgeon, but teaching hospital residents are “assisted by established, experienced, private attending surgeons,” says Beverly Hills plastic surgeon Dr. Robin T.W. Yuan in a RealSelf Q&A.

“I’ve found that sometimes MRIs are not actually very reliable. In some instances, a patient’s MRI said the silicone gel implant had ruptured, and then when I went in to operate on it, it actually hadn’t. I’ve had one or two patients where an MRI showed the implant wasn’t ruptured, but based on my clinical exam I really thought there was a concern, so I went in and it turned out it was ruptured.”
Stay still but pay attention - If you are afraid of needles, don't make yourself writhe with discomfort by thinking about them. Set your mind on something random, like monkeys juggling pineapples. The Botox will be over before you know it. Stay still but pay attention and follow your doctor's instructions. He/she will tell you to smile, relax, frown, etc. during the injection process.

Do not receive BOTOX® Cosmetic if you: are allergic to any of the ingredients in BOTOX® Cosmetic (see Medication Guide for ingredients); had an allergic reaction to any other botulinum toxin product such as Myobloc® (rimabotulinumtoxinB), Dysport® (abobotulinumtoxinA), or Xeomin® (incobotulinumtoxinA); have a skin infection at the planned injection site.


The complexity of the surgery itself is one factor that people tend to forget when considering the overall cost of a good nose job. Depending on whether you have thick or thin skin, multiple injuries to the nose or severe nasal deviations, the complexity of the surgery required may vary, and so too will the cost. The more complex the surgery, the more expensive it will be.  When planning your finances, be sure remember to factor in time spent off work and travel costs as well.
Ok, rhinoplasty does NOT cost a million dollars.  Yippee is what you are thinking!  The cost of a rhinoplasty varies greatly depending on how much work is involved.  Revision rhinoplasty costs more than primary rhinoplasty.  Prices for primary rhinoplasty for surgeon's fees are between $2500-$6000.  Revision rhinoplasty can range from $5000 to over $7500.... READ MORE
The closed vs. open rhinoplasty technique concerns only how the surgeon gets inside the nose to make the required changes, not what’s accomplished with the rhinoplasty procedure itself. Reshaping your nose may include breaking and removing bone and cartilage. If cartilage needs to be added, say, to rebuild the tip of the nose, it’s often taken from the septum, the middle portion of the nose—a technique called a cartilage graft. Cartilage may also be taken from other areas of your body, such as your ear. In some cases, a synthetic material, like a silicone implant, is used; but studies have shown that there may be more complications with synthetics. Cartilage grafts, nasal-bone osteotomies (removal of parts of the bone), dorsal-hump removal, and suture techniques applied to the nasal tip cartilages can all be performed with either the closed- or open-approach rhinoplasty.
On average, RealSelf members paid about $7,500 for a rhinoplasty. This includes the cost of the surgeon, anesthesia, and surgery center. Your cost will depend on your surgeon’s geographical location, their expertise level, and the complexity of your surgery. Insurance doesn’t cover rhinoplasty when it’s purely cosmetic, but it can help if you’re looking for structural corrections to alleviate medical problems. “Insurance will typically cover procedures to help improve nasal function [i.e., septoplasty, nasal valve repair, turbinate reduction],” says Dr. Sam Naficy, a Seattle facial plastic surgeon. “The extent of coverage varies, based on the details of the insurance plan.”
Spread of toxin effects. The effect of botulinum toxin may affect areas away from the injection site and cause serious symptoms including: loss of strength and all-over muscle weakness, double vision, blurred vision and drooping eyelids, hoarseness or change or loss of voice, trouble saying words clearly, loss of bladder control, trouble breathing, and trouble swallowing.
However, it’s not without real risks. A liquid nose job should be done only by a skilled plastic surgeon with extensive knowledge of facial anatomy, using only hyaluronic-acid-based fillers. Misplaced filler can cut off blood flow and cause skin necrosis (tissue death). If it’s caught quickly, the hyaluronic-acid filler can be dissolved by a doctor, using an injection of hyaluronidase. But because this risk is serious, fillers have not been approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration for use in the nose. 
The first point is placed at a distance of about one centimeter from the outer corner of the eye. Then the patient is asked to squint, if wrinkles appear above or below the first mark, additional points are applied. There is a danger of too close to the introduction of the drug, which can cause it to hang over, so the expert’s experience should not cause doubts. It is worthwhile in advance to look at the document confirming the qualification of the doctor.
Do not receive BOTOX® Cosmetic if you: are allergic to any of the ingredients in BOTOX® Cosmetic (see Medication Guide for ingredients); had an allergic reaction to any other botulinum toxin product such as Myobloc® (rimabotulinumtoxinB), Dysport® (abobotulinumtoxinA), or Xeomin® (incobotulinumtoxinA); have a skin infection at the planned injection site.
This includes the cost of the implants, which ranges from $1,000 to $1,300 as well as a facility fee of $800 to $1,200, an anesthesia fee of $600 to $800 and the surgeon's fee that averages $4,005 for silicone-gel filled implants and $3,583 for saline implants. Patients in the western United States can expect to pay the highest average surgeon's fee of about $3,949, while patients in the south central part of the country generally pay lower fees with an average of $2,739.
Multiple procedures can be combined in one surgery; for example, septoplasty (which straightens or repositions the bone and cartilage between your nostrils) is often performed along with rhinoplasty. The additional procedure will increase the total cost of the surgery, but (because it can solve breathing problems) the septoplasty may be covered by your insurance. Rhinoplasty, on the other hand, is usually considered elective and rarely covered.
×