The geographic location of the surgeon's practice can greatly affect the cost of rhinoplasty. More affluent cities and neighborhoods, such as Manhattan and Los Angeles, are plastic surgery hubs where some of the best surgeons in the world practice. Meanwhile, these areas also have a higher cost of living, which means higher overhead costs (rent, staff wages, utilities), and that translates to a higher overall price of rhinoplasty.
Insurance companies rarely cover rhinoplasty; it’s usually considered an elective cosmetic procedure. The exception is if you have an injury or a breathing problem that makes the surgery medically necessary. “Sometimes insurance will cover surgery performed to correct post-traumatic deformities,” says Miami plastic surgeon Dr. Paul Afrooz in a RealSelf Q&A. “Insurance will pay for the portion of a rhinoplasty that is done to improve your breathing, such as correcting a deviated septum [septoplasty] or reconstructing collapsed breathing passages.”

If cost is a concern, but you’d prefer not to finance your rhinoplasty another option is to have your surgery at a teaching hospital. “Many residency training programs at university hospitals will perform rhinoplasty for low cost,” Encino, California facial plastic surgeon Dr. Michael Persky says in a rhinoplasty cost Q&A. Just “make sure that the hospital has trained, board certified professors or rhinoplasty surgeons supervising the resident at the time of surgery.”


Insurance companies rarely cover rhinoplasty; it’s usually considered an elective cosmetic procedure. The exception is if you have an injury or a breathing problem that makes the surgery medically necessary. “Sometimes insurance will cover surgery performed to correct post-traumatic deformities,” says Miami plastic surgeon Dr. Paul Afrooz in a RealSelf Q&A. “Insurance will pay for the portion of a rhinoplasty that is done to improve your breathing, such as correcting a deviated septum [septoplasty] or reconstructing collapsed breathing passages.”

Chances are good that you know at least one person who’s had a nose job. The American Society of Plastic Surgeons says that rhinoplasty is the third most popular cosmetic surgery, with more than 200,000 patients opting for the nose procedure every year. Whether it’s right for you depends on a number of factors, including the cosmetic and structural issues you’re looking to change, your budget, and the amount of time you can take off for recovery.
Generally, rhinoplasty cost comprises the surgeon's fee, anesthesia fee, operating room fee and implant or grafting fee (if applicable). According to the most recent statistics from the American Academy of Facial Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery, the average surgeon's fee for a rhinoplasty is $5,223. The extent of the nose surgery also affects the price. For example, a primary rhinoplasty is not as costly as the far more involved revision rhinoplasty. In general, primary rhinoplasty costs can range from $3,000 to $8,000, and revision rhinoplasty can cost $10,000 to $15,000.
Rhinoplasty, a surgical procedure commonly known as a “nose job,” has become much more common in recent years. There are several reasons for this. For one thing, increasing media use focuses wide attention on the successful surgeries of celebrities (and even ordinary individuals). For another, the culture as a whole has increasingly accepted various means of improving and enhancing one’s appearance. The third, and perhaps most important, reason for the popularity of rhinoplasty is the astonishing improvements that have been made in the operation itself.
“How much do breast implants cost” is an important question to ask before starting your breast augmentation journey. If you’re thinking about a breast augmentation, make sure you know the true cost of breast implants, not just the cost of a primary augmentation. Take into consideration the likelihood of complications, the cost of ongoing maintenance, and the anxiety you may feel not knowing the status of your implant. Beautiful, natural looking breast implants with low maintenance and low risk of complications are within your reach. For more information on the IDEAL IMPLANT Structured Breast Implant, including how you can find an IDEAL IMPLANT surgeon near you visit idealimplant.com.
MENTOR® MemoryGel® Breast Implants, MENTOR® MemoryShape® Breast Implants, and MENTOR® Saline-filled Breast Implants are indicated for breast augmentation in women (at least 22 years old for MemoryGel® Implants and MemoryShape® Implants, and 18 years old for Saline Implants) or for breast reconstruction. Breast implant surgery should not be performed in women with active infection anywhere in their body, with existing cancer or pre-cancer of their breast who have not received adequate treatment for those conditions, or who are currently pregnant or nursing.

A rhinoplasty reshapes your nose, changes the shape of your nostrils, removes a bump or corrects an injury to the bridge of your nose, or addresses other issues, such as breathing problems. In some cases, people choose to have a nose job in order to correct a defect in the nose that makes it difficult to breathe. In short, a good nose job is one that achieves your personal vision for the surgery and doesn’t require additional procedures.
Tell your doctor about all your medical conditions, including: plans to have surgery; had surgery on your face; have trouble raising your eyebrows; drooping eyelids; any other abnormal facial change; are pregnant or plan to become pregnant (it is not known if BOTOX® Cosmetic can harm your unborn baby); are breast-feeding or plan to (it is not known if BOTOX® Cosmetic passes into breast milk).
Chances are good that you know at least one person who’s had a nose job. The American Society of Plastic Surgeons says that rhinoplasty is the third most popular cosmetic surgery, with more than 200,000 patients opting for the nose procedure every year. Whether it’s right for you depends on a number of factors, including the cosmetic and structural issues you’re looking to change, your budget, and the amount of time you can take off for recovery.
The closed vs. open rhinoplasty technique concerns only how the surgeon gets inside the nose to make the required changes, not what’s accomplished with the rhinoplasty procedure itself. Reshaping your nose may include breaking and removing bone and cartilage. If cartilage needs to be added, say, to rebuild the tip of the nose, it’s often taken from the septum, the middle portion of the nose—a technique called a cartilage graft. Cartilage may also be taken from other areas of your body, such as your ear. In some cases, a synthetic material, like a silicone implant, is used; but studies have shown that there may be more complications with synthetics. Cartilage grafts, nasal-bone osteotomies (removal of parts of the bone), dorsal-hump removal, and suture techniques applied to the nasal tip cartilages can all be performed with either the closed- or open-approach rhinoplasty.

Many women are tempted to brush aside the idea of complications when asking how much do breast implants cost, thinking it won’t happen to them. Knowing your statistical risk of complications will help you plan ahead and pick an implant that is more likely to keep you out of complex surgery in the future. For primary augmentations, silicone gel implants have a higher complication rate for both capsular contracture (10.9-16.2% at 7-8 years) and implant rupture (7.2-13.6% at 8 years), than the IDEAL IMPLANT. “The silicone gel from a ruptured implant can stick to the tissues on the chest wall and a capsulectomy is often required,” explains Dr. Mahony. “The warranty may not fully cover these costs. In contrast [for primary augmentations] structured breast implants have a capsular contracture risk of only 6.6% and a rupture risk of only 2.1% at seven years, with revision surgery generally being less invasive.” Dr. Larry Nichter, board-certified plastic surgeon in Newport Beach, California, tells us about the likelihood of subsequent surgeries with IDEAL IMPLANT saying, “It’s incredibly safe and so there’s far fewer lifetime surgeries with an IDEAL IMPLANT Structured Breast Implant, compared to silicone gel implants.”
The ARTOURA™ Breast Tissue Expander or CONTOUR PROFILE® Breast Tissue Expander can be utilized for breast reconstruction after mastectomy, correction of an underdeveloped breast, scar revision, and tissue defect procedures. The expander is intended for temporary subcutaneous or submuscular implantation and is not intended for use beyond six months. Do not use the ARTOURA Tissue Expander nor CONTOUR PROFILE® Tissue Expander in patients where an MRI may be needed. The device could be moved by the MRI causing pain or displacement, potentially resulting in a revision surgery. The incidence of extrusion of the expander has been shown to increase when the expander has been placed in injured areas.
MENTOR® MemoryGel® Breast Implants, MENTOR® MemoryShape® Breast Implants, and MENTOR® Saline-filled Breast Implants are indicated for breast augmentation in women (at least 22 years old for MemoryGel® Implants and MemoryShape® Implants, and 18 years old for Saline Implants) or for breast reconstruction. Breast implant surgery should not be performed in women with active infection anywhere in their body, with existing cancer or pre-cancer of their breast who have not received adequate treatment for those conditions, or who are currently pregnant or nursing.
Rhinoplasties, like other surgeries, especially cosmetic ones, can cost vastly different amounts. The price of any surgery varies with the complexity of the procedure, the expertise and reputation of the surgeon, and the geographic region in which the surgery is to be performed. Prices for the surgery can range anywhere from $3,000 to $15,000. Typically, whatever the fee is, the cost of rhinoplasty does not include anesthesia, operating room facilities, or other related expenses.
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