Although botox is now more widely available than ever before, it’s so important you see a qualified, experienced expert, even if they are more expensive. Yes, there are some clinics that will charge you super-low prices, but remember, if it seems too good to be true, it probably is. Before booking into the Cadogen Clinic I read countless positive reviews on Facebook and Google, yes at around £300 it might not have been the cheapest, but I knew I was in safe hands. Be smart and do your research people, after all, this is your face, you don't want f*ck it up.
On average, RealSelf members paid about $7,500 for a rhinoplasty. This includes the cost of the surgeon, anesthesia, and surgery center. Your cost will depend on your surgeon’s geographical location, their expertise level, and the complexity of your surgery. Insurance doesn’t cover rhinoplasty when it’s purely cosmetic, but it can help if you’re looking for structural corrections to alleviate medical problems. “Insurance will typically cover procedures to help improve nasal function [i.e., septoplasty, nasal valve repair, turbinate reduction],” says Dr. Sam Naficy, a Seattle facial plastic surgeon. “The extent of coverage varies, based on the details of the insurance plan.”
However, it’s not without real risks. A liquid nose job should be done only by a skilled plastic surgeon with extensive knowledge of facial anatomy, using only hyaluronic-acid-based fillers. Misplaced filler can cut off blood flow and cause skin necrosis (tissue death). If it’s caught quickly, the hyaluronic-acid filler can be dissolved by a doctor, using an injection of hyaluronidase. But because this risk is serious, fillers have not been approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration for use in the nose. 
Insurance companies rarely cover rhinoplasty; it’s usually considered an elective cosmetic procedure. The exception is if you have an injury or a breathing problem that makes the surgery medically necessary. “Sometimes insurance will cover surgery performed to correct post-traumatic deformities,” says Miami plastic surgeon Dr. Paul Afrooz in a RealSelf Q&A. “Insurance will pay for the portion of a rhinoplasty that is done to improve your breathing, such as correcting a deviated septum [septoplasty] or reconstructing collapsed breathing passages.”
Dr. Sajan believes in complete transparency when it comes to his plastic surgery pricing. As such, your investment covers all costs that are associated with your procedure – including Dr. Sajan's services, as well as facility, computer imaging, operating room, anesthesia and materials fees, breast implant costs, and pre- and post-operative visits. During your initial consultation, Dr. Sajan will review all of these associated costs with you, to make sure you have a clear understanding of what is included in your investment.
A revision rhinoplasty is a complicated surgery, because the surgeon now has to contend with thick scar tissue—which makes it difficult to raise the skin and soft tissue off the cartilage. “Plus, we often need to reconstruct part of the nose, so we need to take cartilage from other sources,” says Dr. Miller. Surgeons say that the minimum amount of time to wait before you can do revision rhinoplasty, even if there is an obvious problem, is a full year. 

For my patients, I also provide a post-operative packet. This includes arnica and other ointments, gauze and tape, an ice pack, and nasal decongestant spray. If your surgeon does not provide these items to you before or after your surgery, they are all helpful during the healing process. I encourage my patients to get anti-nausea medication for the first few days following surgery as well.
Do not receive BOTOX® Cosmetic if you: are allergic to any of the ingredients in BOTOX® Cosmetic (see Medication Guide for ingredients); had an allergic reaction to any other botulinum toxin product such as Myobloc® (rimabotulinumtoxinB), Dysport® (abobotulinumtoxinA), or Xeomin® (incobotulinumtoxinA); have a skin infection at the planned injection site.
Hospitals are the most expensive choice of facility. In Manhattan, fees can reach $6,000 and beyond for a single procedure. Though it is the most costly option, a hospital is also the best equipped to facilitate surgery involving a patient who is prone to excessive bleeding, or has other conditions that increase the risk of complications. You can expect your doctor to closely examine your medical history to determine if surgery in a hospital is necessary.

Manufacturer’s warranty programs can mitigate some of the costs of treating complications. But, the warranty payment is only available if a rupture is detected. Some surgeons fail to inform their patients of the need for periodic MRIs, or downplay the FDA recommendation in order to make a sale. “Many women don’t know about the maintenance costs and potential expenses of silicone gel implants,” reports Dr. Ellen Mahony, board-certified plastic surgeon in Westport, CT.  “Because rupture with a silicone gel implant is ‘silent,’ it can go undetected for an extended period, often not becoming obvious until the process of capsular contraction has begun.” Capsular contraction leads to a more complex surgery. That means added surgical costs which your warranty may not cover.
Rhinoplasty, a surgical procedure commonly known as a “nose job,” has become much more common in recent years. There are several reasons for this. For one thing, increasing media use focuses wide attention on the successful surgeries of celebrities (and even ordinary individuals). For another, the culture as a whole has increasingly accepted various means of improving and enhancing one’s appearance. The third, and perhaps most important, reason for the popularity of rhinoplasty is the astonishing improvements that have been made in the operation itself.
Some costs for breast implant revision surgery may be covered by your surgeon, depending on the reason for revision. “Generally, if the doctor feels the result is below their expectations, they will often cover much or all of the cost,” says Seattle plastic surgeon Dr. Richard P. Rand in a RealSelf Q&A. “However, if the problem is something about your body, like capsular contracture or wrinkling and rippling above the muscle, it is reasonable that charges should apply as this is no fault of the doctor.” 
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