Manufacturer’s warranty programs can mitigate some of the costs of treating complications. But, the warranty payment is only available if a rupture is detected. Some surgeons fail to inform their patients of the need for periodic MRIs, or downplay the FDA recommendation in order to make a sale. “Many women don’t know about the maintenance costs and potential expenses of silicone gel implants,” reports Dr. Ellen Mahony, board-certified plastic surgeon in Westport, CT.  “Because rupture with a silicone gel implant is ‘silent,’ it can go undetected for an extended period, often not becoming obvious until the process of capsular contraction has begun.” Capsular contraction leads to a more complex surgery. That means added surgical costs which your warranty may not cover.

While more experienced surgeons may charge more for their expertise, that’s not always the case. “You should not choose a qualified surgeon based on high fees any more than you should choose one based on low fees,” says Boca Raton, Florida plastic surgeon Dr. Hilton Becker in a RealSelf Q&A. “The most important factors should be education, experience, certification, and your ability to feel comfortable with your surgeon.”


Both anesthesiologists and registered nurse anesthetists can administer anesthesia. An anesthesiologist is a specially trained physician who will administer anesthesia and monitor your vital signs during surgery. A registered nurse anesthetist has specialized training to do the same.  However, while a registered nurse's services can cost about $300 per hour, an anesthesiologist's services can cost closer to $500 per hour.
Private surgical suites, usually located in the surgeon's office, carry the least expensive facility fees. Usually ranging in cost from $1,000 to $3,000 per procedure, a private surgical facility can offer many advantages. The doctor is very familiar with the facility, and is likely working with the same staff members who have assisted in many previous surgeries. I operate in a certified private surgical facility where my patients enjoy the ultimate privacy and personalized care. In this setting, I am able to hand-pick each of my staff members personally, from nurses to anesthesiologists.
How much you’ll swell really depends on you and on your surgeon’s technique—not so much the type of rhinoplasty you had. Dr. William Portuese, a facial plastic surgeon in Seattle, says that “The amount of swelling after a rhinoplasty procedure depends upon the type of rhinoplasty performed [open versus closed], the thickness of the skin, the amount of alteration required to the nasal tip, and the patient’s variability with the healing process itself.” He notes that “Some patients require taping and steroid shots in the tip of the nose to reduce swelling in that area for the first several months after the procedure.” According to Dr. Miller, “A very clean open rhinoplasty can result in minimal swelling, while with a closed procedure that isn’t performed in the ideal tissue and cartilage, you can have a lot more swelling. If the dissection travels through soft tissue or muscle on top of the cartilage, more bleeding and swelling will develop.” He notes that most people can also expect some bleeding from days two to five, but it should lessen with each passing day.
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