Dr. Sajan believes in complete transparency when it comes to his plastic surgery pricing. As such, your investment covers all costs that are associated with your procedure – including Dr. Sajan's services, as well as facility, computer imaging, operating room, anesthesia and materials fees, breast implant costs, and pre- and post-operative visits. During your initial consultation, Dr. Sajan will review all of these associated costs with you, to make sure you have a clear understanding of what is included in your investment.

One of the main factors that influences how much breast implants cost is whether you choose silicone or saline breast implants. Saline implants cost between $800 and $1,000. Silicone cost between $1,800 and $2,000. On average, silicone implants cost up to $1,000 more than saline implants. While the prices of implants are set by the implant manufacturer, you can always expect that your procedure will cost more if you choose silicone over saline. Newer implant designs, such as IDEAL® implants, also tend to cost more. IDEAL implants, in particular, cost more because they are designed with a special shell that prevents silent rupture. Implant surgery costs by type


The results are usually permanent, aside from normal changes that come with the aging process. If you’re really not happy with your results or have breathing difficulties once your nose has healed, you may be a candidate for a revision rhinoplasty. In many cases, scar tissue is the main culprit. “The force of a scar is very strong,” says Dr. Miller. “It can pull a nose one way or another—push it in, pull it out, turn it.” When this happens, a surgeon has to go back in and tweak the work. 

However, it’s not without real risks. A liquid nose job should be done only by a skilled plastic surgeon with extensive knowledge of facial anatomy, using only hyaluronic-acid-based fillers. Misplaced filler can cut off blood flow and cause skin necrosis (tissue death). If it’s caught quickly, the hyaluronic-acid filler can be dissolved by a doctor, using an injection of hyaluronidase. But because this risk is serious, fillers have not been approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration for use in the nose. 
However, it’s not without real risks. A liquid nose job should be done only by a skilled plastic surgeon with extensive knowledge of facial anatomy, using only hyaluronic-acid-based fillers. Misplaced filler can cut off blood flow and cause skin necrosis (tissue death). If it’s caught quickly, the hyaluronic-acid filler can be dissolved by a doctor, using an injection of hyaluronidase. But because this risk is serious, fillers have not been approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration for use in the nose. 
Once your bone and cartilage have been resculpted, your surgeon pulls the skin back down and stitches it along the open-rhinoplasty incision across the columella (the tissue that links the nasal tip to the nasal base). “When done properly, that incision is extremely hard to see, once it’s healed,” says Dr. Miller. With a closed procedure, the incisions are made inside your nostrils, so there’s no visible scarring, and the sutures are usually dissolvable. 
However, it’s not without real risks. A liquid nose job should be done only by a skilled plastic surgeon with extensive knowledge of facial anatomy, using only hyaluronic-acid-based fillers. Misplaced filler can cut off blood flow and cause skin necrosis (tissue death). If it’s caught quickly, the hyaluronic-acid filler can be dissolved by a doctor, using an injection of hyaluronidase. But because this risk is serious, fillers have not been approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration for use in the nose. 
Rhinoplasties, like other surgeries, especially cosmetic ones, can cost vastly different amounts. The price of any surgery varies with the complexity of the procedure, the expertise and reputation of the surgeon, and the geographic region in which the surgery is to be performed. Prices for the surgery can range anywhere from $3,000 to $15,000. Typically, whatever the fee is, the cost of rhinoplasty does not include anesthesia, operating room facilities, or other related expenses.
One final note: In today's rough-and-tumble economy, many specialists with little or no training in the field of plastic surgery are turning to cosmetic procedures to increase revenues. They are also offering these procedures at reduced costs. Don't be fooled. Many of these practitioners have only taken a weekend course on how to perform your surgery. You get what you pay for.
This includes the cost of the implants, which ranges from $1,000 to $1,300 as well as a facility fee of $800 to $1,200, an anesthesia fee of $600 to $800 and the surgeon's fee that averages $4,005 for silicone-gel filled implants and $3,583 for saline implants. Patients in the western United States can expect to pay the highest average surgeon's fee of about $3,949, while patients in the south central part of the country generally pay lower fees with an average of $2,739.
If you’re researching “how much do breast implants cost,” chances are you are imagining all the benefits they offer. Breast augmentation is the top cosmetic plastic surgery procedure performed in the United States for a reason. Breast augmentations have a high rate of patient satisfaction according to research. In a study published in the May 2013 issue of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery, researchers gathered information from 225 women after their breast augmentations. The study revealed that 91.1% of women felt improved self-esteem, 64.3% had an improved quality of life, and 98.7% would repeat the surgery. But there is another side to breast implants, one you should know about before scheduling your plastic surgery consultation. While the initial costs and satisfaction rates are similar between implant types, the long-term maintenance costs and emotional toll differs in important ways. Silicone gel breast implants carry a high rate of certain complications and an increased anxiety when compared to the newest breast implant on the market, IDEAL IMPLANT® Structured Breast Implants.
The fees for Breast Augmentation Surgery typically can range from $5,500 to $9,000. The costs vary on several factors. These factors include implant type and the fees for the facility where the surgery will be performed. Additionally, implant costs vary between saline vs. silicone and smooth vs. textured implants, as well as shaped implants vs. round implants.
In addition to the financial cost of breast implants, women need to be aware of the emotional cost when asking how much do breast implants cost. Not knowing the status of their implants can take a toll on woman’s peace of mind. Recent survey findings* showed over 98% of women reported feeling concerned about silent rupture, including many women who already had silicone gel implants. When rupture is detected, it can result in feelings of insecurity and anxiety, as they don’t know how long it has been going on or whether they could have found out sooner. Both the worry and reality of silent rupture take a real toll on a woman’s overall well being, yet too many women don’t have all the facts before making a decision about their choice of implant.
After relaying to Nurse Libbie that I didn’t want it to look ‘too frozen’, she agrees to give me 10 units across my forehead, and 15 in the centre of my frown- the average dose is between 10-25 units. I lay down across the bed in her treatment room and as she preps the solution, I’m asked to frown and raise my brows. As I do so she inserts the needle, and a tiny dose of botox by Allergen is inserted across six points of my forehead and in between my eyebrows.

“I’ve found that sometimes MRIs are not actually very reliable. In some instances, a patient’s MRI said the silicone gel implant had ruptured, and then when I went in to operate on it, it actually hadn’t. I’ve had one or two patients where an MRI showed the implant wasn’t ruptured, but based on my clinical exam I really thought there was a concern, so I went in and it turned out it was ruptured.”

A rhinoplasty reshapes your nose, changes the shape of your nostrils, removes a bump or corrects an injury to the bridge of your nose, or addresses other issues, such as breathing problems. In some cases, people choose to have a nose job in order to correct a defect in the nose that makes it difficult to breathe. In short, a good nose job is one that achieves your personal vision for the surgery and doesn’t require additional procedures.
"Sometimes, a good reputation is well deserved, and sometimes it's merely hype and marketing," Dr. Naderi said. "There are reality show plastic surgeons who charge high fees, for example, based on their television exposure and publicity. Then, there are well-known plastic surgeons in the field who focus mainly on nose surgery and are true specialists."
Dr. Miller says it’s also important for patients to have realistic expectations. “It’s not a good idea to take a wide, thick nose and turn it into one that’s thin and tiny,” he says. “But if the steps are done properly, we can make the desired changes.” Thick nasal skin that makes it challenging to refine the nasal tip needs to be thinned out, for example. It’s important to find a board-certified facial plastic surgeon who specializes in ethnic rhinoplasties. 

One final note: In today's rough-and-tumble economy, many specialists with little or no training in the field of plastic surgery are turning to cosmetic procedures to increase revenues. They are also offering these procedures at reduced costs. Don't be fooled. Many of these practitioners have only taken a weekend course on how to perform your surgery. You get what you pay for.
Insurance companies rarely cover rhinoplasty; it’s usually considered an elective cosmetic procedure. The exception is if you have an injury or a breathing problem that makes the surgery medically necessary. “Sometimes insurance will cover surgery performed to correct post-traumatic deformities,” says Miami plastic surgeon Dr. Paul Afrooz in a RealSelf Q&A. “Insurance will pay for the portion of a rhinoplasty that is done to improve your breathing, such as correcting a deviated septum [septoplasty] or reconstructing collapsed breathing passages.”

Some people opt for a temporary nonsurgical nose job—also called a liquid rhinoplasty—with hyaluronic=acid-based injectable fillers, like Voluma or Restylane Lyft. This minimally invasive procedure can camouflage bumps, create more symmetry, or lift and build up the tip of your nose. This approach has its limitations though. “If you have a large nose, it’s not going to get any smaller with fillers,” says Dr. Miller, though changes in proportions can sometimes make it appear smaller. It also can’t fix a crooked nose.
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