If you’re researching “how much do breast implants cost,” chances are you are imagining all the benefits they offer. Breast augmentation is the top cosmetic plastic surgery procedure performed in the United States for a reason. Breast augmentations have a high rate of patient satisfaction according to research. In a study published in the May 2013 issue of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery, researchers gathered information from 225 women after their breast augmentations. The study revealed that 91.1% of women felt improved self-esteem, 64.3% had an improved quality of life, and 98.7% would repeat the surgery. But there is another side to breast implants, one you should know about before scheduling your plastic surgery consultation. While the initial costs and satisfaction rates are similar between implant types, the long-term maintenance costs and emotional toll differs in important ways. Silicone gel breast implants carry a high rate of certain complications and an increased anxiety when compared to the newest breast implant on the market, IDEAL IMPLANT® Structured Breast Implants.
For my patients, I also provide a post-operative packet. This includes arnica and other ointments, gauze and tape, an ice pack, and nasal decongestant spray. If your surgeon does not provide these items to you before or after your surgery, they are all helpful during the healing process. I encourage my patients to get anti-nausea medication for the first few days following surgery as well.
The IDEAL IMPLANT Structured Breast Implant is often compared to silicone gel breast implants because they both offer beautiful, natural looking results. But, beyond the aesthetic comparisons, the IDEAL IMPLANT Structured Breast Implant and silicone gel breast implants are very different. The IDEAL IMPLANT Structured Breast Implant is filled with saline for a woman’s peace of mind. Saline is naturally absorbed by the body in case of a rupture, and a rupture can be easily detected by simply looking at the breasts. Without silicone gel inside there is no need for repeated MRIs and no anxiety about silent ruptures. The risk of complications such as rupture and capsular contracture are also much lower with the IDEAL IMPLANT based on clinical trial results at 8 years. That means the cost of your primary breast augmentation is likely the only cost you need to consider when asking how much do breast implants cost.
Your primary augmentation is not the only cost you need to factor in when you are asking how much do breast implants cost. Women with silicone gel breast implants must factor in long term maintenance costs. Silicone gel breast implants can have “silent ruptures,” where an implant ruptures without showing any symptoms. The FDA recommends women with silicone gel implants get an MRI scan three years after getting their implants, then every two years for the life of the implant to detect silent ruptures. If a silicone gel implant ruptures, you will need surgery to remove the implant shell and any leaked silicone gel. It is important to remove implants that have ruptured because the silicone gel may begin to leak outside of the capsule and cause painful symptoms. The FDA lists a few of these symptoms as, “a decrease in breast size, change in breast implant shape, hard lumps over the implant or chest area, an uneven appearance of the breasts, pain or tenderness, tingling, swelling, numbness, burning, or changes in sensation.” However, because of the out-of-pocket cost of MRIs, many women skip their recommended MRI scans. According to Business Insider the average cost of an MRI is $444 to $1468. That means if a woman with silicone gel breast implants keeps up with the recommended MRIs she will pay on average $3,108 to $10,276 just for MRIs if her implants stay intact for 20 years. That puts the total cost of silicone gel breast implants closer to $10,000-$20,000 over 20 years, and even more if a revision surgery is needed.
A rhinoplasty reshapes your nose, changes the shape of your nostrils, removes a bump or corrects an injury to the bridge of your nose, or addresses other issues, such as breathing problems. In some cases, people choose to have a nose job in order to correct a defect in the nose that makes it difficult to breathe. In short, a good nose job is one that achieves your personal vision for the surgery and doesn’t require additional procedures.
If you’re researching “how much do breast implants cost,” chances are you are imagining all the benefits they offer. Breast augmentation is the top cosmetic plastic surgery procedure performed in the United States for a reason. Breast augmentations have a high rate of patient satisfaction according to research. In a study published in the May 2013 issue of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery, researchers gathered information from 225 women after their breast augmentations. The study revealed that 91.1% of women felt improved self-esteem, 64.3% had an improved quality of life, and 98.7% would repeat the surgery. But there is another side to breast implants, one you should know about before scheduling your plastic surgery consultation. While the initial costs and satisfaction rates are similar between implant types, the long-term maintenance costs and emotional toll differs in important ways. Silicone gel breast implants carry a high rate of certain complications and an increased anxiety when compared to the newest breast implant on the market, IDEAL IMPLANT® Structured Breast Implants.

Insurance companies rarely cover rhinoplasty; it’s usually considered an elective cosmetic procedure. The exception is if you have an injury or a breathing problem that makes the surgery medically necessary. “Sometimes insurance will cover surgery performed to correct post-traumatic deformities,” says Miami plastic surgeon Dr. Paul Afrooz in a RealSelf Q&A. “Insurance will pay for the portion of a rhinoplasty that is done to improve your breathing, such as correcting a deviated septum [septoplasty] or reconstructing collapsed breathing passages.”
The closed vs. open rhinoplasty technique concerns only how the surgeon gets inside the nose to make the required changes, not what’s accomplished with the rhinoplasty procedure itself. Reshaping your nose may include breaking and removing bone and cartilage. If cartilage needs to be added, say, to rebuild the tip of the nose, it’s often taken from the septum, the middle portion of the nose—a technique called a cartilage graft. Cartilage may also be taken from other areas of your body, such as your ear. In some cases, a synthetic material, like a silicone implant, is used; but studies have shown that there may be more complications with synthetics. Cartilage grafts, nasal-bone osteotomies (removal of parts of the bone), dorsal-hump removal, and suture techniques applied to the nasal tip cartilages can all be performed with either the closed- or open-approach rhinoplasty. 

The cost of a revision rhinoplasty (a second surgery to correct previous work you’re not happy with) costs closer to $10,000 on average; However revisions vary “perhaps more than any other plastic surgery,” according to Marina del Rey, California plastic surgeon Dr. Ziyad Hammoudeh., in a RealSelf Q&A. “Sometimes a revision rhinoplasty can be a very minor tweaking performed by the original rhinoplasty surgeon while other times it can be major reconstruction with rib cartilage that necessitates a revision rhinoplasty expert.”

Asian, Latin, and African American rhinoplasties require a special skill set. Surgeons say the challenge lies in reshaping and resizing the nose while retaining its distinct features and keeping it proportional to the face. “Typically, African American, Asian, and Latin noses have flat bridges and wide tips,” says Dr. Miller. “The number-one goal is to create a new tip [through cartilage grafting] that has better support.” Patients also often request a reduction in nostril size.  
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