The amount of time the procedure takes is also an important factor. The longer and more complicated the procedure, the more you can expect to pay for it. This is why a breast augmentation with fat transfer and a breast lift with implants cost more than a standard breast augmentation with implants. Some surgeons include their fee in the price they give you for your entire procedure. Be sure to ask during your consultation!
Be on the same page as your doctor - Make sure both you and your physician are clear about what facial areas you want to treat, how you ideally want them to be fixed, and what the ideal final result may be. Different people have different aesthetics. For instance, if the "frozen face" look is your doctor's definition of successful Botox but you disagree, you better make sure both of you are aiming for the same target or you'll end up with a result your doctor thinks is beautiful but you think is horrific.
"Sometimes, a good reputation is well deserved, and sometimes it's merely hype and marketing," Dr. Naderi said. "There are reality show plastic surgeons who charge high fees, for example, based on their television exposure and publicity. Then, there are well-known plastic surgeons in the field who focus mainly on nose surgery and are true specialists."
On average, RealSelf members paid about $7,500 for a rhinoplasty. This includes the cost of the surgeon, anesthesia, and surgery center. Your cost will depend on your surgeon’s geographical location, their expertise level, and the complexity of your surgery. Insurance doesn’t cover rhinoplasty when it’s purely cosmetic, but it can help if you’re looking for structural corrections to alleviate medical problems. “Insurance will typically cover procedures to help improve nasal function [i.e., septoplasty, nasal valve repair, turbinate reduction],” says Dr. Sam Naficy, a Seattle facial plastic surgeon. “The extent of coverage varies, based on the details of the insurance plan.”
You will find many different answers depending on who your ask. Cost will vary depending on many factors.... first of all it differs depending on if a board certified plastic surgeon is performing the surgery or not. Also, if the surgery is performed in a hospital based operating room vs. an office setting, if a board certified anesthesiologist is involved vs. a nurse (or sometimes performing... READ MORE
While you can read about all of this online, it's best to hear it straight from your doctor's mouth. Also, ask about what your doctor will do on the off chance that something goes wrong with your Botox treatment. If you have significant bruising, will he give you a discounted v-beam laser treatment to minimize the bruising? If you end up with Spock brows, will he fix them free of charge? What if your Botox wears off in a week, will he give you an additional touch-up for free? Do not be afraid to ask questions! It's better to have answers before than after.
Insurance companies rarely cover rhinoplasty; it’s usually considered an elective cosmetic procedure. The exception is if you have an injury or a breathing problem that makes the surgery medically necessary. “Sometimes insurance will cover surgery performed to correct post-traumatic deformities,” says Miami plastic surgeon Dr. Paul Afrooz in a RealSelf Q&A. “Insurance will pay for the portion of a rhinoplasty that is done to improve your breathing, such as correcting a deviated septum [septoplasty] or reconstructing collapsed breathing passages.”
Michelle Staughton is a Patient Education Interviewer and Patient Care Coordinator for several top Plastic Surgeons in Melbourne, Victoria, Australia. With over FOUR years’ experience helping plastic surgery patients at Cosmetic Surgery for Women and Men, after having been a patient herself, Michelle offers a wealth of knowledge to help surgical patients with cosmetic and plastic surgery planning and recovery tips.

The closed vs. open rhinoplasty technique concerns only how the surgeon gets inside the nose to make the required changes, not what’s accomplished with the rhinoplasty procedure itself. Reshaping your nose may include breaking and removing bone and cartilage. If cartilage needs to be added, say, to rebuild the tip of the nose, it’s often taken from the septum, the middle portion of the nose—a technique called a cartilage graft. Cartilage may also be taken from other areas of your body, such as your ear. In some cases, a synthetic material, like a silicone implant, is used; but studies have shown that there may be more complications with synthetics. Cartilage grafts, nasal-bone osteotomies (removal of parts of the bone), dorsal-hump removal, and suture techniques applied to the nasal tip cartilages can all be performed with either the closed- or open-approach rhinoplasty.
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