Ambulatory surgical centers are more expensive than private offices. These venues are owned by a third party, and provide everything your surgeon needs to safely perform rhinoplasty and other cosmetic surgery procedures. They typically charge by the hour. Ambulatory surgical center fees are usually around $3,000 or more for a single rhinoplasty procedure.

Both anesthesiologists and registered nurse anesthetists can administer anesthesia. An anesthesiologist is a specially trained physician who will administer anesthesia and monitor your vital signs during surgery. A registered nurse anesthetist has specialized training to do the same.  However, while a registered nurse's services can cost about $300 per hour, an anesthesiologist's services can cost closer to $500 per hour.
Meeting with multiple prospective surgeons is also a great way to make your choice. Make sure you are comfortable speaking to the surgeon, and make sure he or she asks you plenty of questions, and does not rush you through any part of the consultation. After you have fully described your goals, the surgeon should provide you with informative, thoroughly explained options.
Your plastic surgeon's experience and reputation make the greatest difference in the cost of rhinoplasty. Here in Manhattan, it is possible to undergo the procedure for as little as $3,000 when it is performed by surgeons-in-training, supervised by senior surgeons. Meanwhile, there are experienced surgeons who are not performing as many rhinoplasties as they would like, and may be willing to perform the procedure for $5,000 to $7,000. However, if rhinoplasty is your surgeon's specialty, this can provide the best chances of achieving the results you desire. His or her fees will reflect that, and depending on where the practice is located, the total cost of surgery can be upwards of $15,000.

"Many times, the cost of rhinoplasty or other surgery in New York City would be three times the price as in a smaller town, but it is not three times better necessarily," Dr. Park said. "At the same time, I would warn patients to beware of a physician in a small town that costs a fraction of what an average rhinoplasty would cost. In general, when a surgeon is throwing in discounts, I would be very wary."


The ARTOURA™ Breast Tissue Expander or CONTOUR PROFILE® Breast Tissue Expander can be utilized for breast reconstruction after mastectomy, correction of an underdeveloped breast, scar revision, and tissue defect procedures. The expander is intended for temporary subcutaneous or submuscular implantation and is not intended for use beyond six months. Do not use the ARTOURA Tissue Expander nor CONTOUR PROFILE® Tissue Expander in patients where an MRI may be needed. The device could be moved by the MRI causing pain or displacement, potentially resulting in a revision surgery. The incidence of extrusion of the expander has been shown to increase when the expander has been placed in injured areas.
For detailed indications, contraindications, warnings, and precautions associated with the use of all MENTOR® Implantable Devices, which include MENTOR® Saline-filled Implants, MemoryGel® Implants, MemoryShape® Implants, ARTOURA™ Expanders, and CONTOUR PROFILE® Expanders, please refer to the Instructions for Use (IFU) provided with each product or visit www.mentorwwllc.com.
The closed vs. open rhinoplasty technique concerns only how the surgeon gets inside the nose to make the required changes, not what’s accomplished with the rhinoplasty procedure itself. Reshaping your nose may include breaking and removing bone and cartilage. If cartilage needs to be added, say, to rebuild the tip of the nose, it’s often taken from the septum, the middle portion of the nose—a technique called a cartilage graft. Cartilage may also be taken from other areas of your body, such as your ear. In some cases, a synthetic material, like a silicone implant, is used; but studies have shown that there may be more complications with synthetics. Cartilage grafts, nasal-bone osteotomies (removal of parts of the bone), dorsal-hump removal, and suture techniques applied to the nasal tip cartilages can all be performed with either the closed- or open-approach rhinoplasty.
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