Rhinoplasty can be performed in one of three places: private surgical suites, ambulatory surgical centers, or hospitals. You should speak with your surgeon and make certain that their chosen venue has been accredited by an organization such as the American Association for Accreditation of Ambulatory Surgical Facilities (AAAA), the Accreditation Association for Ambulatory Health Care (AAAHC), or the Joint Commission for Accreditation of Healthcare Organizations (JCAHO).
Additional costs may vary depending on whether the patient is having surgery in a surgery center, physician’s office, or a hospital setting. Patients should also determine whether or not the lab work will be included in the quote. Options that are not included in the basic surgical costs can be placement of a pain pump, or use of a Keller Funnel for implant placement. Thus, the average price of breast implants will vary depending on the circumstances.
How much you’ll swell really depends on you and on your surgeon’s technique—not so much the type of rhinoplasty you had. Dr. William Portuese, a facial plastic surgeon in Seattle, says that “The amount of swelling after a rhinoplasty procedure depends upon the type of rhinoplasty performed [open versus closed], the thickness of the skin, the amount of alteration required to the nasal tip, and the patient’s variability with the healing process itself.” He notes that “Some patients require taping and steroid shots in the tip of the nose to reduce swelling in that area for the first several months after the procedure.” According to Dr. Miller, “A very clean open rhinoplasty can result in minimal swelling, while with a closed procedure that isn’t performed in the ideal tissue and cartilage, you can have a lot more swelling. If the dissection travels through soft tissue or muscle on top of the cartilage, more bleeding and swelling will develop.” He notes that most people can also expect some bleeding from days two to five, but it should lessen with each passing day. 
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