A rhinoplasty reshapes your nose, changes the shape of your nostrils, removes a bump or corrects an injury to the bridge of your nose, or addresses other issues, such as breathing problems. In some cases, people choose to have a nose job in order to correct a defect in the nose that makes it difficult to breathe. In short, a good nose job is one that achieves your personal vision for the surgery and doesn’t require additional procedures.
The IDEAL IMPLANT Structured Breast Implant is often compared to silicone gel breast implants because they both offer beautiful, natural looking results. But, beyond the aesthetic comparisons, the IDEAL IMPLANT Structured Breast Implant and silicone gel breast implants are very different. The IDEAL IMPLANT Structured Breast Implant is filled with saline for a woman’s peace of mind. Saline is naturally absorbed by the body in case of a rupture, and a rupture can be easily detected by simply looking at the breasts. Without silicone gel inside there is no need for repeated MRIs and no anxiety about silent ruptures. The risk of complications such as rupture and capsular contracture are also much lower with the IDEAL IMPLANT based on clinical trial results at 8 years. That means the cost of your primary breast augmentation is likely the only cost you need to consider when asking how much do breast implants cost.
One final note: In today's rough-and-tumble economy, many specialists with little or no training in the field of plastic surgery are turning to cosmetic procedures to increase revenues. They are also offering these procedures at reduced costs. Don't be fooled. Many of these practitioners have only taken a weekend course on how to perform your surgery. You get what you pay for.

Because rhinoplasty is an elective cosmetic procedure, for the majority of people, their insurance will not cover it.  If you have a deviated septum or a serious defect that affects your breathing, you may be able to have insurance cover some of the nose job cost for this septoplasty. An injury, illness or cancer that causes you to lose part of your nose can require a reconstructive rhinoplasty, which may also be partly covered by insurance. This will require preauthorization by the insurance company and other tests or scans to verify the defect.


As with any medical/surgical treatment, individual results may vary. Only a surgeon/physician can determine whether reconstruction or augmentation>is an appropriate course of treatment. The following are general adverse events associated with breast implant surgery: Device Rupture, Capsular contracture, Infection, Hematoma/Seroma, Pain, Reoperation, Implant removal, changes in Nipple and Breast Sensation, unsatisfactory results, breast-feeding complications. Other reported conditions are listed in the Product Insert Data Sheet (PIDS). See full list in the PIDS for the product information. These potential adverse events, including contraindications, warnings, and precautions need to be discussed with your doctor prior to surgery.
How much you’ll swell really depends on you and on your surgeon’s technique—not so much the type of rhinoplasty you had. Dr. William Portuese, a facial plastic surgeon in Seattle, says that “The amount of swelling after a rhinoplasty procedure depends upon the type of rhinoplasty performed [open versus closed], the thickness of the skin, the amount of alteration required to the nasal tip, and the patient’s variability with the healing process itself.” He notes that “Some patients require taping and steroid shots in the tip of the nose to reduce swelling in that area for the first several months after the procedure.” According to Dr. Miller, “A very clean open rhinoplasty can result in minimal swelling, while with a closed procedure that isn’t performed in the ideal tissue and cartilage, you can have a lot more swelling. If the dissection travels through soft tissue or muscle on top of the cartilage, more bleeding and swelling will develop.” He notes that most people can also expect some bleeding from days two to five, but it should lessen with each passing day.
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