A rhinoplasty, commonly called a nose job, is a surgical procedure that changes the shape and, often, the size of your nose. If your nose has a prominent bump, crooked bridge, or wide tip, or it seems too big (or even too small) in relation to the rest of your facial features, surgical rhinoplasty could be your best option to correct it. It’s sometimes combined (and often confused) with a septoplasty—the surgical correction of a deviated septum, a condition where the wall between your nasal passages is crooked. A septoplasty is performed to improve breathing, while a rhinoplasty is usually performed for cosmetic enhancement.  Both procedures can be performed simultaneously under one anesthetic, with one recovery period. 

However, it’s not without real risks. A liquid nose job should be done only by a skilled plastic surgeon with extensive knowledge of facial anatomy, using only hyaluronic-acid-based fillers. Misplaced filler can cut off blood flow and cause skin necrosis (tissue death). If it’s caught quickly, the hyaluronic-acid filler can be dissolved by a doctor, using an injection of hyaluronidase. But because this risk is serious, fillers have not been approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration for use in the nose. 

The overall cost for breast implants varies based on your location, the doctor you employ and the type of implant you select. In 2014, the average cost of breast augmentation surgery was $3,708, according to statistics from the American Society of Plastic Surgeons. This cost doesn’t include anesthesia and other related surgery costs, so it’s possible for the procedure to cost as much as $5,000 to $10,000.
Do not receive BOTOX® Cosmetic if you: are allergic to any of the ingredients in BOTOX® Cosmetic (see Medication Guide for ingredients); had an allergic reaction to any other botulinum toxin product such as Myobloc® (rimabotulinumtoxinB), Dysport® (abobotulinumtoxinA), or Xeomin® (incobotulinumtoxinA); have a skin infection at the planned injection site.
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