The results are usually permanent, aside from normal changes that come with the aging process. If you’re really not happy with your results or have breathing difficulties once your nose has healed, you may be a candidate for a revision rhinoplasty. In many cases, scar tissue is the main culprit. “The force of a scar is very strong,” says Dr. Miller. “It can pull a nose one way or another—push it in, pull it out, turn it.” When this happens, a surgeon has to go back in and tweak the work. 
Some people opt for a temporary nonsurgical nose job—also called a liquid rhinoplasty—with hyaluronic=acid-based injectable fillers, like Voluma or Restylane Lyft. This minimally invasive procedure can camouflage bumps, create more symmetry, or lift and build up the tip of your nose. This approach has its limitations though. “If you have a large nose, it’s not going to get any smaller with fillers,” says Dr. Miller, though changes in proportions can sometimes make it appear smaller. It also can’t fix a crooked nose.
Generally, rhinoplasty cost comprises the surgeon's fee, anesthesia fee, operating room fee and implant or grafting fee (if applicable). According to the most recent statistics from the American Academy of Facial Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery, the average surgeon's fee for a rhinoplasty is $5,223. The extent of the nose surgery also affects the price. For example, a primary rhinoplasty is not as costly as the far more involved revision rhinoplasty. In general, primary rhinoplasty costs can range from $3,000 to $8,000, and revision rhinoplasty can cost $10,000 to $15,000.
Do not receive BOTOX® Cosmetic if you: are allergic to any of the ingredients in BOTOX® Cosmetic (see Medication Guide for ingredients); had an allergic reaction to any other botulinum toxin product such as Myobloc® (rimabotulinumtoxinB), Dysport® (abobotulinumtoxinA), or Xeomin® (incobotulinumtoxinA); have a skin infection at the planned injection site.
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