Generally, rhinoplasty cost comprises the surgeon's fee, anesthesia fee, operating room fee and implant or grafting fee (if applicable). According to the most recent statistics from the American Academy of Facial Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery, the average surgeon's fee for a rhinoplasty is $5,223. The extent of the nose surgery also affects the price. For example, a primary rhinoplasty is not as costly as the far more involved revision rhinoplasty. In general, primary rhinoplasty costs can range from $3,000 to $8,000, and revision rhinoplasty can cost $10,000 to $15,000.

In addition to the financial cost of breast implants, women need to be aware of the emotional cost when asking how much do breast implants cost. Not knowing the status of their implants can take a toll on woman’s peace of mind. Recent survey findings* showed over 98% of women reported feeling concerned about silent rupture, including many women who already had silicone gel implants. When rupture is detected, it can result in feelings of insecurity and anxiety, as they don’t know how long it has been going on or whether they could have found out sooner. Both the worry and reality of silent rupture take a real toll on a woman’s overall well being, yet too many women don’t have all the facts before making a decision about their choice of implant.
One of the main things to keep in mind regarding medical tourism is how difficult it may be to see or even contact your doctor after surgery. Follow-up appointments are extremely important. When surgery is performed internationally, patients either miss post-operative appointments or have to stay in the area for an extended period of time. When you have surgery closer to home, you can more easily attend these appointments and visit your surgeon if any other problems or concerns arise. Many surgeons like myself will revise their own work at no additional charge except for anesthesia fees or surgical venue fees.
If you’re researching “how much do breast implants cost,” chances are you are imagining all the benefits they offer. Breast augmentation is the top cosmetic plastic surgery procedure performed in the United States for a reason. Breast augmentations have a high rate of patient satisfaction according to research. In a study published in the May 2013 issue of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery, researchers gathered information from 225 women after their breast augmentations. The study revealed that 91.1% of women felt improved self-esteem, 64.3% had an improved quality of life, and 98.7% would repeat the surgery. But there is another side to breast implants, one you should know about before scheduling your plastic surgery consultation. While the initial costs and satisfaction rates are similar between implant types, the long-term maintenance costs and emotional toll differs in important ways. Silicone gel breast implants carry a high rate of certain complications and an increased anxiety when compared to the newest breast implant on the market, IDEAL IMPLANT® Structured Breast Implants.
Some people opt for a temporary nonsurgical nose job—also called a liquid rhinoplasty—with hyaluronic=acid-based injectable fillers, like Voluma or Restylane Lyft. This minimally invasive procedure can camouflage bumps, create more symmetry, or lift and build up the tip of your nose. This approach has its limitations though. “If you have a large nose, it’s not going to get any smaller with fillers,” says Dr. Miller, though changes in proportions can sometimes make it appear smaller. It also can’t fix a crooked nose.
If you’re having what’s called an open rhinoplasty, the surgeon will make an incision (about 6 millimeters long) in the skin between the nostrils. “Open rhinoplasty is a very common technique, where the skin is lifted upward like the hood on a car,” says Dr. Ronald Schuster, a Baltimore plastic surgeon, in a RealSelf Q&A about open vs. closed rhinoplasties. If you’re having a closed rhinoplasty, all incisions are placed on the inside of the nose, so there are no external scars.

Do not receive BOTOX® Cosmetic if you: are allergic to any of the ingredients in BOTOX® Cosmetic (see Medication Guide for ingredients); had an allergic reaction to any other botulinum toxin product such as Myobloc® (rimabotulinumtoxinB), Dysport® (abobotulinumtoxinA), or Xeomin® (incobotulinumtoxinA); have a skin infection at the planned injection site.


If you’re hoping your breast implants will be covered by insurance because of something like asymmetry or changes after pregnancy, you probably need to explore other financing options. Breast implants are considered cosmetic surgery, so insurance companies typically won’t cover them. However, “Breast Implants are covered if they are being used as part of reconstruction after breast cancer or mastectomy,” says Houston plastic surgeon Dr. C. Bob Basu in a RealSelf Q&A.
Rhinoplasty, a surgical procedure commonly known as a “nose job,” has become much more common in recent years. There are several reasons for this. For one thing, increasing media use focuses wide attention on the successful surgeries of celebrities (and even ordinary individuals). For another, the culture as a whole has increasingly accepted various means of improving and enhancing one’s appearance. The third, and perhaps most important, reason for the popularity of rhinoplasty is the astonishing improvements that have been made in the operation itself.

The closed vs. open rhinoplasty technique concerns only how the surgeon gets inside the nose to make the required changes, not what’s accomplished with the rhinoplasty procedure itself. Reshaping your nose may include breaking and removing bone and cartilage. If cartilage needs to be added, say, to rebuild the tip of the nose, it’s often taken from the septum, the middle portion of the nose—a technique called a cartilage graft. Cartilage may also be taken from other areas of your body, such as your ear. In some cases, a synthetic material, like a silicone implant, is used; but studies have shown that there may be more complications with synthetics. Cartilage grafts, nasal-bone osteotomies (removal of parts of the bone), dorsal-hump removal, and suture techniques applied to the nasal tip cartilages can all be performed with either the closed- or open-approach rhinoplasty.
×