Look for a board-certified plastic surgeon from the American Board of Plastic Surgery who has extensive experience performing rhinoplasties and other areas of facial plastic surgery. You can search for one by geographic region on A Board Certified Plastic Surgeon Resource. Though they typically charge higher fees, these surgeons have all undergone intensive surgical training and can help ensure that you receive the best possible treatment.
"Sometimes, a good reputation is well deserved, and sometimes it's merely hype and marketing," Dr. Naderi said. "There are reality show plastic surgeons who charge high fees, for example, based on their television exposure and publicity. Then, there are well-known plastic surgeons in the field who focus mainly on nose surgery and are true specialists."
A few weeks before your surgery, you will meet with the surgeon to discuss your personal goals and plan out the procedure. You will also have follow-up appointments post-op to monitor your progress. After surgery, you will need ice packs, gauze and certain pain medication for pain management purposes. All of these pre and post-op appointments and supplies are necessary to take into account when determining what the overall cost of the procedure will be. Be sure to ask your surgeon’s office whether appointments and supplies are included as a package cost and what, if any, additional supplies you may need to buy as you recover from your nose job.
Facial plastic surgeons and board-certified plastic surgeons are the specialists to go to for nose surgery. Facial plastic surgeons do their residency training in otolaryngology, or head and neck surgery, followed by fellowships in facial plastic surgery. Facial plastic surgeons should be certified by the American Board of Facial Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery. Plastic surgeons do their residency training in general surgery followed by a fellowship in plastic surgery. They should be certified by the American Board of Plastic Surgery.
A rhinoplasty, commonly called a nose job, is a surgical procedure that changes the shape and, often, the size of your nose. If your nose has a prominent bump, crooked bridge, or wide tip, or it seems too big (or even too small) in relation to the rest of your facial features, surgical rhinoplasty could be your best option to correct it. It’s sometimes combined (and often confused) with a septoplasty—the surgical correction of a deviated septum, a condition where the wall between your nasal passages is crooked. A septoplasty is performed to improve breathing, while a rhinoplasty is usually performed for cosmetic enhancement.  Both procedures can be performed simultaneously under one anesthetic, with one recovery period.
Asian, Latin, and African American rhinoplasties require a special skill set. Surgeons say the challenge lies in reshaping and resizing the nose while retaining its distinct features and keeping it proportional to the face. “Typically, African American, Asian, and Latin noses have flat bridges and wide tips,” says Dr. Miller. “The number-one goal is to create a new tip [through cartilage grafting] that has better support.” Patients also often request a reduction in nostril size. 
You can also ask to see before and after photos and testimonials from past patients. In addition to making sure your surgeon is highly experienced, you should feel comfortable talking to him or her. Do you feel the surgeon is hearing you and understanding your goals for the procedure? Establishing a rapport with the surgeon is extremely important to ensure that you get the results you want.
Both anesthesiologists and registered nurse anesthetists can administer anesthesia. An anesthesiologist is a specially trained physician who will administer anesthesia and monitor your vital signs during surgery. A registered nurse anesthetist has specialized training to do the same.  However, while a registered nurse's services can cost about $300 per hour, an anesthesiologist's services can cost closer to $500 per hour.
Additional costs may vary depending on whether the patient is having surgery in a surgery center, physician’s office, or a hospital setting. Patients should also determine whether or not the lab work will be included in the quote. Options that are not included in the basic surgical costs can be placement of a pain pump, or use of a Keller Funnel for implant placement. Thus, the average price of breast implants will vary depending on the circumstances.

Getting a nose job is a big decision and you want to make sure you’re getting the best procedure possible. A factor in any kind of procedure is costly, and you may be specifically be wondering how much does a good nose job cost? If you’ve been doing your research, you know that the costs of rhinoplasty widely vary. Many factors affect the total cost of a nose job, and high price doesn’t always mean high quality. Typically, the surgeon’s fee for a primary rhinoplasty is between $6,000-10,000. Revisions typically are a bit more costly particularly when they require structural grafting, which is needed if the skeletal framework is weakened or malpositioned.


Ok, rhinoplasty does NOT cost a million dollars.  Yippee is what you are thinking!  The cost of a rhinoplasty varies greatly depending on how much work is involved.  Revision rhinoplasty costs more than primary rhinoplasty.  Prices for primary rhinoplasty for surgeon's fees are between $2500-$6000.  Revision rhinoplasty can range from $5000 to over $7500.... READ MORE


If you’re having what’s called an open rhinoplasty, the surgeon will make an incision (about 6 millimeters long) in the skin between the nostrils. “Open rhinoplasty is a very common technique, where the skin is lifted upward like the hood on a car,” says Dr. Ronald Schuster, a Baltimore plastic surgeon, in a RealSelf Q&A about open vs. closed rhinoplasties. If you’re having a closed rhinoplasty, all incisions are placed on the inside of the nose, so there are no external scars.
The closed vs. open rhinoplasty technique concerns only how the surgeon gets inside the nose to make the required changes, not what’s accomplished with the rhinoplasty procedure itself. Reshaping your nose may include breaking and removing bone and cartilage. If cartilage needs to be added, say, to rebuild the tip of the nose, it’s often taken from the septum, the middle portion of the nose—a technique called a cartilage graft. Cartilage may also be taken from other areas of your body, such as your ear. In some cases, a synthetic material, like a silicone implant, is used; but studies have shown that there may be more complications with synthetics. Cartilage grafts, nasal-bone osteotomies (removal of parts of the bone), dorsal-hump removal, and suture techniques applied to the nasal tip cartilages can all be performed with either the closed- or open-approach rhinoplasty.
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