Facial plastic surgeons and board-certified plastic surgeons are the specialists to go to for nose surgery. Facial plastic surgeons do their residency training in otolaryngology, or head and neck surgery, followed by fellowships in facial plastic surgery. Facial plastic surgeons should be certified by the American Board of Facial Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery. Plastic surgeons do their residency training in general surgery followed by a fellowship in plastic surgery. They should be certified by the American Board of Plastic Surgery.
If you’re researching “how much do breast implants cost,” chances are you are imagining all the benefits they offer. Breast augmentation is the top cosmetic plastic surgery procedure performed in the United States for a reason. Breast augmentations have a high rate of patient satisfaction according to research. In a study published in the May 2013 issue of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery, researchers gathered information from 225 women after their breast augmentations. The study revealed that 91.1% of women felt improved self-esteem, 64.3% had an improved quality of life, and 98.7% would repeat the surgery. But there is another side to breast implants, one you should know about before scheduling your plastic surgery consultation. While the initial costs and satisfaction rates are similar between implant types, the long-term maintenance costs and emotional toll differs in important ways. Silicone gel breast implants carry a high rate of certain complications and an increased anxiety when compared to the newest breast implant on the market, IDEAL IMPLANT® Structured Breast Implants.
The results are usually permanent, aside from normal changes that come with the aging process. If you’re really not happy with your results or have breathing difficulties once your nose has healed, you may be a candidate for a revision rhinoplasty. In many cases, scar tissue is the main culprit. “The force of a scar is very strong,” says Dr. Miller. “It can pull a nose one way or another—push it in, pull it out, turn it.” When this happens, a surgeon has to go back in and tweak the work. 
How much you’ll swell really depends on you and on your surgeon’s technique—not so much the type of rhinoplasty you had. Dr. William Portuese, a facial plastic surgeon in Seattle, says that “The amount of swelling after a rhinoplasty procedure depends upon the type of rhinoplasty performed [open versus closed], the thickness of the skin, the amount of alteration required to the nasal tip, and the patient’s variability with the healing process itself.” He notes that “Some patients require taping and steroid shots in the tip of the nose to reduce swelling in that area for the first several months after the procedure.” According to Dr. Miller, “A very clean open rhinoplasty can result in minimal swelling, while with a closed procedure that isn’t performed in the ideal tissue and cartilage, you can have a lot more swelling. If the dissection travels through soft tissue or muscle on top of the cartilage, more bleeding and swelling will develop.” He notes that most people can also expect some bleeding from days two to five, but it should lessen with each passing day.
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