To apply for insurance coverage for a functional rhinoplasty, your surgeon can perform one of several tests. A CT scan shows irregularities within the nose that are not visible to the naked eye. An acoustic rhinometry is a test that maps the inside of a patient's nose. A rhinomanometry tests the level of airflow within the nostrils. In some cases, insurance companies require that patients show that they have attempted to treat nasal obstruction with other treatments. These may include antihistamines, allergy desensitizing injections, and steroid spray.

"Many times, the cost of rhinoplasty or other surgery in New York City would be three times the price as in a smaller town, but it is not three times better necessarily," Dr. Park said. "At the same time, I would warn patients to beware of a physician in a small town that costs a fraction of what an average rhinoplasty would cost. In general, when a surgeon is throwing in discounts, I would be very wary."


A revision rhinoplasty is a complicated surgery, because the surgeon now has to contend with thick scar tissue—which makes it difficult to raise the skin and soft tissue off the cartilage. “Plus, we often need to reconstruct part of the nose, so we need to take cartilage from other sources,” says Dr. Miller. Surgeons say that the minimum amount of time to wait before you can do revision rhinoplasty, even if there is an obvious problem, is a full year. 
However, it’s not without real risks. A liquid nose job should be done only by a skilled plastic surgeon with extensive knowledge of facial anatomy, using only hyaluronic-acid-based fillers. Misplaced filler can cut off blood flow and cause skin necrosis (tissue death). If it’s caught quickly, the hyaluronic-acid filler can be dissolved by a doctor, using an injection of hyaluronidase. But because this risk is serious, fillers have not been approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration for use in the nose.  

Because rhinoplasty is an elective cosmetic procedure, for the majority of people, their insurance will not cover it.  If you have a deviated septum or a serious defect that affects your breathing, you may be able to have insurance cover some of the nose job cost for this septoplasty. An injury, illness or cancer that causes you to lose part of your nose can require a reconstructive rhinoplasty, which may also be partly covered by insurance. This will require preauthorization by the insurance company and other tests or scans to verify the defect.
Multiple procedures can be combined in one surgery; for example, septoplasty (which straightens or repositions the bone and cartilage between your nostrils) is often performed along with rhinoplasty. The additional procedure will increase the total cost of the surgery, but (because it can solve breathing problems) the septoplasty may be covered by your insurance. Rhinoplasty, on the other hand, is usually considered elective and rarely covered.
The complexity of the surgery itself is one factor that people tend to forget when considering the overall cost of a good nose job. Depending on whether you have thick or thin skin, multiple injuries to the nose or severe nasal deviations, the complexity of the surgery required may vary, and so too will the cost. The more complex the surgery, the more expensive it will be.  When planning your finances, be sure remember to factor in time spent off work and travel costs as well.
If your breast implants rupture, or you develop capsular contracture (two of the top reasons for revision surgery according to the FDA), you will need surgery to correct the issue. You can choose to remove your breast implants with or without replacement. This surgery will be similar in cost to your primary breast augmentation, or could be higher depending on the complexity. Again, health insurance companies do not usually cover costs associated with breast implants, even if you have a medical reason to remove them. As stated above, warranties may or may not cover costs as well.

The results are usually permanent, aside from normal changes that come with the aging process. If you’re really not happy with your results or have breathing difficulties once your nose has healed, you may be a candidate for a revision rhinoplasty. In many cases, scar tissue is the main culprit. “The force of a scar is very strong,” says Dr. Miller. “It can pull a nose one way or another—push it in, pull it out, turn it.” When this happens, a surgeon has to go back in and tweak the work. 

Although cost is certainly an important factor when it comes to deciding where to have a nose job, making sure you find the right surgeon should be at the top of your list of needs. After you do your online research or talk to friends who have had the same or a similar procedure, schedule a consultation with your top choices. At the consultation, come prepared with questions to address all of your concerns and ensure that your needs will be met.  Some questions to ask include:


One final note: In today's rough-and-tumble economy, many specialists with little or no training in the field of plastic surgery are turning to cosmetic procedures to increase revenues. They are also offering these procedures at reduced costs. Don't be fooled. Many of these practitioners have only taken a weekend course on how to perform your surgery. You get what you pay for.
The ARTOURA™ Breast Tissue Expander or CONTOUR PROFILE® Breast Tissue Expander can be utilized for breast reconstruction after mastectomy, correction of an underdeveloped breast, scar revision, and tissue defect procedures. The expander is intended for temporary subcutaneous or submuscular implantation and is not intended for use beyond six months. Do not use the ARTOURA Tissue Expander nor CONTOUR PROFILE® Tissue Expander in patients where an MRI may be needed. The device could be moved by the MRI causing pain or displacement, potentially resulting in a revision surgery. The incidence of extrusion of the expander has been shown to increase when the expander has been placed in injured areas.
Spread of toxin effects. The effect of botulinum toxin may affect areas away from the injection site and cause serious symptoms including: loss of strength and all-over muscle weakness, double vision, blurred vision and drooping eyelids, hoarseness or change or loss of voice, trouble saying words clearly, loss of bladder control, trouble breathing, and trouble swallowing.

The complexity of the surgery itself is one factor that people tend to forget when considering the overall cost of a good nose job. Depending on whether you have thick or thin skin, multiple injuries to the nose or severe nasal deviations, the complexity of the surgery required may vary, and so too will the cost. The more complex the surgery, the more expensive it will be.  When planning your finances, be sure remember to factor in time spent off work and travel costs as well.
Some people opt for a temporary nonsurgical nose job—also called a liquid rhinoplasty—with hyaluronic=acid-based injectable fillers, like Voluma or Restylane Lyft. This minimally invasive procedure can camouflage bumps, create more symmetry, or lift and build up the tip of your nose. This approach has its limitations though. “If you have a large nose, it’s not going to get any smaller with fillers,” says Dr. Miller, though changes in proportions can sometimes make it appear smaller. It also can’t fix a crooked nose.
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