The overall cost for breast implants varies based on your location, the doctor you employ and the type of implant you select. In 2014, the average cost of breast augmentation surgery was $3,708, according to statistics from the American Society of Plastic Surgeons. This cost doesn’t include anesthesia and other related surgery costs, so it’s possible for the procedure to cost as much as $5,000 to $10,000.
A rhinoplasty reshapes your nose, changes the shape of your nostrils, removes a bump or corrects an injury to the bridge of your nose, or addresses other issues, such as breathing problems. In some cases, people choose to have a nose job in order to correct a defect in the nose that makes it difficult to breathe. In short, a good nose job is one that achieves your personal vision for the surgery and doesn’t require additional procedures.
One final note: In today's rough-and-tumble economy, many specialists with little or no training in the field of plastic surgery are turning to cosmetic procedures to increase revenues. They are also offering these procedures at reduced costs. Don't be fooled. Many of these practitioners have only taken a weekend course on how to perform your surgery. You get what you pay for.
“How much do breast implants cost” is an important question to ask before starting your breast augmentation journey. If you’re thinking about a breast augmentation, make sure you know the true cost of breast implants, not just the cost of a primary augmentation. Take into consideration the likelihood of complications, the cost of ongoing maintenance, and the anxiety you may feel not knowing the status of your implant. Beautiful, natural looking breast implants with low maintenance and low risk of complications are within your reach. For more information on the IDEAL IMPLANT Structured Breast Implant, including how you can find an IDEAL IMPLANT surgeon near you visit idealimplant.com.

Women with ruptured silicone gel implants also need to factor in downtime when asking how much do breast implants cost. Whether you take time off work, hire a babysitter for your kids, or make other accommodations while you recover from surgery, you need to factor in these costs. Dr. Jane Rowley, a board-certified plastic surgeon in Lubbock, Texas, explains the difference between removal of silicone gel implants and the IDEAL IMPLANT, “there’s a big difference between removing a ruptured IDEAL IMPLANT and a ruptured silicone gel implant. A ruptured IDEAL IMPLANT can be removed easily with a local anesthetic. A silicone gel implant, if they’re not ruptured, can come out that easy. But if they are ruptured, most of the time its stuck, and it bleeds, and you have to put drains in. So it’s not an easy recovery, it’s not an easy surgery. With an IDEAL IMPLANT I can almost guarantee them ahead of time, if your implant is leaking it will be easy to remove and replace, you will be back to work in a day or two at the most. With a silicone gel implant I’ll say, ‘I don’t know what your recovery is going to be, it might come out easily, it might not come out easily. You might need to take week off work, you might have to take two days off work.’”
To apply for insurance coverage for a functional rhinoplasty, your surgeon can perform one of several tests. A CT scan shows irregularities within the nose that are not visible to the naked eye. An acoustic rhinometry is a test that maps the inside of a patient's nose. A rhinomanometry tests the level of airflow within the nostrils. In some cases, insurance companies require that patients show that they have attempted to treat nasal obstruction with other treatments. These may include antihistamines, allergy desensitizing injections, and steroid spray.
A complicated surgery will take longer, and cost more than a straightforward operation. “Some rhinoplasties involve only removing a hump or tip work while others require correction of breathing problems with cartilage grafts,” says Dr. Hammoudeh, in a RealSelf Q&A. “The cost can range widely based on the amount of time needed to complete all of the steps.”
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How much you’ll swell really depends on you and on your surgeon’s technique—not so much the type of rhinoplasty you had. Dr. William Portuese, a facial plastic surgeon in Seattle, says that “The amount of swelling after a rhinoplasty procedure depends upon the type of rhinoplasty performed [open versus closed], the thickness of the skin, the amount of alteration required to the nasal tip, and the patient’s variability with the healing process itself.” He notes that “Some patients require taping and steroid shots in the tip of the nose to reduce swelling in that area for the first several months after the procedure.” According to Dr. Miller, “A very clean open rhinoplasty can result in minimal swelling, while with a closed procedure that isn’t performed in the ideal tissue and cartilage, you can have a lot more swelling. If the dissection travels through soft tissue or muscle on top of the cartilage, more bleeding and swelling will develop.” He notes that most people can also expect some bleeding from days two to five, but it should lessen with each passing day.
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