Insurance companies rarely cover rhinoplasty; it’s usually considered an elective cosmetic procedure. The exception is if you have an injury or a breathing problem that makes the surgery medically necessary. “Sometimes insurance will cover surgery performed to correct post-traumatic deformities,” says Miami plastic surgeon Dr. Paul Afrooz in a RealSelf Q&A. “Insurance will pay for the portion of a rhinoplasty that is done to improve your breathing, such as correcting a deviated septum [septoplasty] or reconstructing collapsed breathing passages.”
There are two main types of implants for you to consider: saline and silicone. Most people say the silicone implants feel and look more natural than saline, but they cost more. Silicone implants are typically about $1,000 more than saline, but if you’re interested in gummy bear implants—a type of silicone implant—expect to pay even more. In a RealSelf Q&A, Omaha, Nebraska plastic surgeon Dr. Richard J. Bruneteau says you should expect to pay “about $500 more than standard silicone implants.”
“The old saline implants offered peace of mind but a less realistic result; silicone gel implants offered a more realistic look and feel but with concerns about silent rupture as well as long term safety and complications. The timing could not be better for the structured breast implant, which uniquely offers women the benefits of natural look and feel in addition to an unparalleled safety profile and peace of mind. This would be my personal choice for breast augmentation and has become the choice the majority of informed women in my practice are making for themselves.”
After care from the experts was pretty simple and didn’t require anything too strenuous. To keep results looking optimum I’m told to avoid things such as smoking, excess alcohol, sun exposure and getting stressed - which can all help break down collagen faster, decreasing the longevity of Botox. ‘I always recommend that my clients use a daily antioxidant topical serum and an SPF 50 too,’ advises Spyrou.
Tell your doctor about all your medical conditions, including: plans to have surgery; had surgery on your face; have trouble raising your eyebrows; drooping eyelids; any other abnormal facial change; are pregnant or plan to become pregnant (it is not known if BOTOX® Cosmetic can harm your unborn baby); are breast-feeding or plan to (it is not known if BOTOX® Cosmetic passes into breast milk).

While you can read about all of this online, it's best to hear it straight from your doctor's mouth. Also, ask about what your doctor will do on the off chance that something goes wrong with your Botox treatment. If you have significant bruising, will he give you a discounted v-beam laser treatment to minimize the bruising? If you end up with Spock brows, will he fix them free of charge? What if your Botox wears off in a week, will he give you an additional touch-up for free? Do not be afraid to ask questions! It's better to have answers before than after.
“I’ve found that sometimes MRIs are not actually very reliable. In some instances, a patient’s MRI said the silicone gel implant had ruptured, and then when I went in to operate on it, it actually hadn’t. I’ve had one or two patients where an MRI showed the implant wasn’t ruptured, but based on my clinical exam I really thought there was a concern, so I went in and it turned out it was ruptured.”
Do not receive BOTOX® Cosmetic if you: are allergic to any of the ingredients in BOTOX® Cosmetic (see Medication Guide for ingredients); had an allergic reaction to any other botulinum toxin product such as Myobloc® (rimabotulinumtoxinB), Dysport® (abobotulinumtoxinA), or Xeomin® (incobotulinumtoxinA); have a skin infection at the planned injection site.
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