Liposuction is a surgical procedure that removes fat via suction. It’s typically done with a thin tube, called a cannula, attached to a vacuum. No matter how healthy your diet or how often you work out, you can still have pockets of unwanted fat that resist your best efforts. With liposuction, an experienced surgeon can remove fat, contouring your hips, thighs, stomach, abs, waist, chin, or other areas. 
You’re going to feel sore, especially during the first few days after liposuction. You’ll be swollen and bruised, and you’ll need a few days to rest before you head back to work. “I generally recommend that my patients take between three and seven days off after liposuction, depending on how many areas were worked on and your pain tolerance,” says Dr. Samuel Sohn, a plastic surgeon in Henderson, Nevada. Your doctor will prescribe pain medication, though you may find you need only an over-the-counter pain reliever.
Because of the large pattern of skin cutout with the Inverted T scar (Wise-pattern) the scar complication can look really bad. Here is a photo of one of these wounds using this surgical technique. Although it is not a life threatening problem, this wound complication at the incision location could certainly look very scary to the patient. In addition to scars, this procedure also tends to flatten the breast, instead of making them perky. I no longer perform this technique in my practice as I feel that the other surgical techniques are far superior.
According to the American Society for Aesthetic Plastic Surgery®, liposuction is the second most popular cosmetic procedure in the country, surpassed only by breast augmentation. In 2012, the ASAPS there were 313,011 liposuction procedures performed in the US in 2012. While liposuction is the second most popular surgical procedure in general, it is the number one treatment for men seeking cosmetic surgery.[2]
Body lifts: Body lifts are more comprehensive treatments designed to target the abdomen, thighs, and buttocks at the same time. During this procedure, a doctor will create circumferential incisions, running along the groin, thighs, hips, and waist. In addition to tightening damaged muscles, he or she may use liposuction to remove fat from one or more of these regions.
A: In general, no plastic surgeon can guarantee that breastfeeding will still be possible after the breast lift surgery. But in most cases, you should be able to breastfeed after a breast lift if the nipple was left intact during the procedure, and was still connected to all the anatomical structures underneath the nipple. However, if you are planning to become pregnant, its recommended that you wait until after your pregnancy to have a breast lift. Reason being, as your breasts enlarge during pregnancy the skin will stretch. Depending on the elasticity of your skin before pregnancy and the degree to which your breasts enlarge during pregnancy, your breast skin may permanently stretch. In this case the results of breast lift surgery performed before pregnancy would be lost.
Tummy tucks: One of the most popular forms of body contouring, with a tummy tuck, a doctor can tighten the abdominal region via an incision running between the hipbones. In a full tummy tuck, he or she may also relocate the belly button up higher on the abdomen. By using liposuction to remove excess fat, the doctor can give patients a flatter, trimmer stomach.
First, a circumareolar incision is made to remove a doughnut-shaped area of skin from around the areola. This also allows the nipple-areola complex to be moved up significantly (potentially as much as 8 or 9 centimeters) without causing irregularities, and it leaves almost no visible scars. The skin is then separated from the breast tissue, and the inverted-T technique is used internally to shape and mold the breast tissue. Once your perky, better-defined breast is formed, the skin is redraped. To prolong and maintain your results, a mesh is added as an internal bra beneath the skin. This provides additional support to the breast tissue.
Because of the large pattern of skin cutout with the Inverted T scar (Wise-pattern) the scar complication can look really bad. Here is a photo of one of these wounds using this surgical technique. Although it is not a life threatening problem, this wound complication at the incision location could certainly look very scary to the patient. In addition to scars, this procedure also tends to flatten the breast, instead of making them perky. I no longer perform this technique in my practice as I feel that the other surgical techniques are far superior.
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