Severe complications associated with liposuction are extremely rare, but should be taken into consideration when deciding whether liposuction is right for you. These complications include adverse reactions to anesthesia, cardiac arrest, cardiac arrhythmia, internal blood clots, excessive bleeding, severe drug interactions, allergic reactions to medication, permanent nerve damage, seizures, and brain damage from anesthesia.
Although the mastopexy procedure is one of the safest and most rewarding plastic surgeries, concern about breast lift scars is natural for women who are considering the procedure. As a woman and a breast surgeon, I have a deep understanding of the mix of emotions that can accompany a breast lift. You’re longing for a return to the high, perky breasts you had in younger years, before major weight loss or prior to pregnancy and breastfeeding. At the same time, you realize any surgery carries risk and excess scarring is one of them. Here we’ll provide expert tips to help you avoid visible breast lift scars.

Tumescent Liposuction : Tumescent liposuction is similar to traditional liposuction, but experts often hail its innovative use of medication and reduced risks for complications. During tumescent liposuction, the doctor will inject a special solution (a mixture of salt solution, lidocaine, and epinephrine) into the layer of fat. The amount of fluid is usually measured at three times that of the fat being removed. The solution swells the fat cells, making them easier to isolate and remove. It also shrinks blood vessels, and because it contains local anesthesia, it can help ease discomfort without the risks associated with general anesthesia. Any minimal risks involve how much of the solution is injected, and how much lidocaine it contains.
I personally think nurse-administered anesthesia is perfectly appropriate in many cases. In fact, a 2014 study by the Chochrane Collaboration research group concluded that it was "not possible to say whether there were any differences in care between medically qualified anaesthetists and nurse anaesthetists." But if the patient is anxious about the procedure, or if the treatment scope is extensive, the extra cost of an anesthesiologist can be well worth the money. What I consider extensive liposuction can easily take up to 4 hours, so it would be reasonable to estimate that anesthesia administered by an anesthesiologist could cost about $2,000 in this scenario.
LipoSelection® : This specialized form of liposuction, developed by VASER®, emulsifies fat cells with ultrasound and breaks them up even further with the LipoSelection probe. The doctor can then easily remove the fat with liposuction tubes, leaving the surrounding blood vessels, nerves and other tissue virtually unaffected. This technique involves less discomfort and bruising than most other types of liposuction, but it does cost a bit more than other forms of manual liposuction.

Liposuction patients should continue to monitor their incision sites in case of infection, and they should schedule check-up appointments with their surgeons to monitor healing. Excessive swelling can sometimes be a sign of other risks or side-effects, so it's important for individuals to communicate with their doctors to ensure everything is going smoothly.


For tumescent liposuction, the most common technique, your doctor will make one or more small (one-quarter inch or less) incisions in the area to be treated and inject a large quantity of a mixture of saline (salt water), local anesthesia, and epinephrine into your tissue. The fluid causes the fat to become swollen, firm, and easier to remove. (It also constricts your blood vessels, which reduces bruising, blood loss, and recovery time.) The surgeon then inserts the cannula through the same incision and passes it back and forth under the skin to break up the fat before suctioning it out. For a very small area, the procedure takes around 30 minutes, while a 360 liposuction—which includes the abdomen, flanks, back, and all around the torso—lasts three to four hours. 

Liposuction will cause some swelling afterwards, although some techniques cause less than others. During follow-up visits with a doctor, it is important for a patient to inform the doctor of any changes in the amount of post-liposuction swelling. Significant increases in swelling can be a warning sign of other complications. Swelling in the ankles and treated areas is common, along with a temporary lumpy appearance that will typically fade within six months. If the thighs are treated, inflammation of the veins may occur, but this should also go away after a few weeks.
• WarmSculpting with SculpSure’s diode-laser energy creates heat that kills fat cells during a 25-minute treatment, and multiple areas can be treated at the same time. There are very few side effects and zero downtime. WarmSculpting’s Worth It Rating is almost as high as that of liposuction, and it’s significantly less expensive. Just keep in mind you’ll have to wait up to three months to see your full results, and you might need two or more treatments to reach your goals.
If you have been told that you require liposuction for medical reasons, you can be certain that insurance will only cover the extent of treatment needed to relieve your symptoms. In many cases, this amount of treatment is not going to result in flattering aesthetics. As such, you should consider the benefits of paying for further treatment that will help you not only achieve relief, but also an aesthetic enhancement that can help you feel confident about your appearance. Many practices, including mine, will work with patients in need of liposuction for medical reasons to determine a more comprehensive treatment plan, often at a discounted rate.
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