Tumescent Liposuction : Tumescent liposuction is similar to traditional liposuction, but experts often hail its innovative use of medication and reduced risks for complications. During tumescent liposuction, the doctor will inject a special solution (a mixture of salt solution, lidocaine, and epinephrine) into the layer of fat. The amount of fluid is usually measured at three times that of the fat being removed. The solution swells the fat cells, making them easier to isolate and remove. It also shrinks blood vessels, and because it contains local anesthesia, it can help ease discomfort without the risks associated with general anesthesia. Any minimal risks involve how much of the solution is injected, and how much lidocaine it contains.
In sum, a liposuction procedure that only involves removing some fat from the abdominal region will cost much less than a procedure that involves removing fat from the midsection, flanks, and thighs, or involves other complementary procedures. As with virtually any medical procedure, the extent of your treatment will have a major effect on what you can expect to pay.

Because of the large pattern of skin cutout with the Inverted T scar (Wise-pattern) the scar complication can look really bad. Here is a photo of one of these wounds using this surgical technique. Although it is not a life threatening problem, this wound complication at the incision location could certainly look very scary to the patient. In addition to scars, this procedure also tends to flatten the breast, instead of making them perky. I no longer perform this technique in my practice as I feel that the other surgical techniques are far superior.


Your comfort with the scars are a very personal aspect of the surgery, but to the extent you are able, I urge you to keep in perspective the lesser importance of the incision pattern. I advise patients never to compromise contour for a lesser scar. I’d argue that it is more important to choose a highly experienced board-certified plastic surgeon who is a specialist in cosmetic surgery of the breast and body. Good luck with your surgical journey!
The “crescent lift” technique is mostly used for women who have a very small amount of sagging to correct, and involves one small incision that runs halfway around the top half of the edge of the areola.  It’s usually only done when a patient is undergoing a breast augmentation, and even then only rarely. It’s more of a preventative measure, unlike the other options, which are focused on breasts that have more advanced sagging.
Any licensed physician can perform liposuction, but it's usually performed by plastic surgeons and dermatologists in their offices with local anesthesia, though it may be performed in a hospital under general anesthesia. No special training is required, though some doctors' professional associations recommend it. When choosing a doctor, you may want to consider whether they have had specific training for liposuction and how many they have performed.
You may notice an improved body contour immediately (for instance, if you have your saddlebags suctioned), but your results will be disguised initially by swelling. Swelling should improve dramatically after six weeks and continue to go down over the next six months. If you think you’ll need more lipo to get the result you want, wait at least six months for the swelling to subside, then evaluate the situation with your surgeon. Just keep in mind that you’ll continue healing and seeing better results for up to a year.

Recently I read an article on Medscape from the journal “Wounds” about wound healing problems in Breast Reduction and Breast lift (Mastopexy). The article, Treatment of Wounds Following Breast Reduction and Mastopexy With Subsequent Wound Dehiscence With Charged Polystyrene Microspheres, cited that the use of the Inverted T technique (Wise Pattern) has a 10% wound complication rate. IMO, that is a pretty high complication rate, and it is much higher than the other two techniques, the Vertical Scar and the Benelli technique. In my practice, the wound rate with the other scars is less than 5%.
The average cost of liposuction is about $6,000. Your cost will vary based on factors like your surgeon’s level of experience and office location, the amount of fat being removed, and if you’ve had liposuction before. “Most people price liposuction based on the number of areas being treated—and in general, the per-area cost will come down with additional areas,” says Toronto plastic surgeon Dr. Mathew A. Plant, in a RealSelf Q&A. “Usually, the first area is more expensive, because this price includes the costs of the operating room, equipment, and anesthetic. Once you’re into additional areas, those costs have mostly been covered, and you’re simply adding time, which allows for a price drop.” Liposuction is considered a cosmetic procedure, which means your health insurance will likely not cover it.
While cost is obviously an important consideration when it comes to liposuction, it is not the most important one. Patients should remember that their health and cosmetic satisfaction are ultimately the top priorities. Choosing an inexperienced doctor to save some money could cost far more in the long run if they require a corrective procedure or if they develop serious health complications.
Ive for the most part always had big boobs and i hated them , I want them lifted alot but i dont want that T shaped scarring , i want them done to look better thatd just make another upcoming issue . I was a 40DD gained wait and my boobs got to 40G i lost the weight now my boobs are just saggy instead of as full and big as they use to be . So about how much would it cost with minimal scarring and is it possible to get the benelli incision with how big my boobs are ?
Recovery time differs for each patient, but in general, you can return to work two to four days after your liposuction treatment. The exact time will depend on the area you had treated and your body's natural healing process. If you have an extremely physical job, you may need to take more time off; doctors recommend that patients wait at least three weeks after liposuction before engaging in aerobic exercise.

Liposuction patients should continue to monitor their incision sites in case of infection, and they should schedule check-up appointments with their surgeons to monitor healing. Excessive swelling can sometimes be a sign of other risks or side-effects, so it's important for individuals to communicate with their doctors to ensure everything is going smoothly.
Liposuction is a procedure that can be performed either under local or general anesthesia. Local anesthesia allows you to remain conscious during surgery, but the treatment area is numbed so you will not feel any discomfort. This option can cost about $100 or more per hour. General anesthesia is used to completely sedate the patient. If it is administered by a nurse, general anesthesia can cost $300 or more per hour. When it is administered by an anesthesiologist, it can cost $450 or more per hour. Deciding which method of anesthesia to use largely depends on the extent of treatment. If the patient is having a small amount of fat removed, local anesthesia may be sufficient. On the other hand, if the patient is having extensive liposuction performed, or if it is being performed in conjunction with other procedures, general anesthesia will probably be the best option.
Although liposuction is used to get rid of fat, it's not a weight-loss solution. Liposuction works best on deposits of fat that are concentrated in particular areas and resistant to exercise, particularly around the stomach, thighs, hips and buttocks. You might lose a little weight, but it's not likely to be significant. Liposuction also won't fix a bulging stomach that's caused by weakness in the abdominal wall, and it won't tighten loose skin. For toning and flattening the abdominal area, however, liposuction is sometimes combined with abdominoplasty, also known as a tummy tuck, in which fat is removed from the belly, the muscle wall repaired and excess skin removed.
If you are contemplating a breast lift, with or without an implant, be sure to discuss your goals and objectives, very specifically, including the type of scar you should expect following surgery. Your surgeon should be able to show you exactly where your scar will be. He/she should be willing to discuss your options, describe his surgical techniques, and answer any other questions you have about your breast lift.
While cost is obviously an important consideration when it comes to liposuction, it is not the most important one. Patients should remember that their health and cosmetic satisfaction are ultimately the top priorities. Choosing an inexperienced doctor to save some money could cost far more in the long run if they require a corrective procedure or if they develop serious health complications.
Scars are inevitable after any incision in the skin, of course, because scarring is part of the body’s “self-repair” process. Breast lift surgery, in my experience, is a very satisfying procedure for the vast majority of patients–even with the unavoidable, often minimal, scarring. Scars may be in an anchor shape, in the crease below the breast and from the center of the crease up to the areola, although there are other types of scarring. When you choose an experienced surgeon, you’ll find that your breast lift scars are well hidden, even when wearing low-cut clothing. This is one of the signs of a skilled breast lift surgeon.
When skin is damaged, the body repairs it by creating new collagen fibers, which gives the healing area a different look and texture: a scar. The “mended” skin will be less flexible than the skin around it, and it may have no hair follicles. The scarred skin might be a different color than surrounding skin and the color will change as healing progresses. This is completely natural.
Recovery time differs for each patient, but in general, you can return to work two to four days after your liposuction treatment. The exact time will depend on the area you had treated and your body's natural healing process. If you have an extremely physical job, you may need to take more time off; doctors recommend that patients wait at least three weeks after liposuction before engaging in aerobic exercise.

Following liposuction, patients often experience some soreness and tenderness in the treatment area. This can usually be controlled with over-the-counter pain medication, and a physician may prescribe stronger medication, if needed. However, this discomfort is typically minimal, and patients can typically return to work about two days after their procedures. If they experience severe discomfort or if the soreness gets worse after several days, patients should alert their doctors.


Good skin tone is essential to a good outcome, since the skin needs to snap back into the body’s new contours once the fat is removed. “If a patient has good skin elasticity, they’re going to have a really good result,” says New York plastic surgeon Dr. John Mesa. “But if the patient has bad elasticity, like a woman who’s had multiple pregnancies and the skin on her belly is too stretched, the skin isn’t going to shrink—and you’ll be left with sagging” (unless lipo is paired with a tummy tuck).

Because of the large pattern of skin cutout with the Inverted T scar (Wise-pattern) the scar complication can look really bad. Here is a photo of one of these wounds using this surgical technique. Although it is not a life threatening problem, this wound complication at the incision location could certainly look very scary to the patient. In addition to scars, this procedure also tends to flatten the breast, instead of making them perky. I no longer perform this technique in my practice as I feel that the other surgical techniques are far superior.
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